22389 Study Supports Gluten-free Diet for 'Potential' Celiac Disease Patients - Celiac.com
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Study Supports Gluten-free Diet for 'Potential' Celiac Disease Patients


New study indicates more people should be gluten-free.

Celiac.com 12/26/2010 - Should everyone with symptoms of celiac disease go on a gluten-free diet? Current practice allows many patients with symptoms of celiac disease, but no gut damage, and thus no official diagnosis, to forgo a gluten-free diet.

In a new study, researchers found that people with celiac disease symptoms have the same distinctive metabolic fingerprint as patients with full-blown disease, and who must follow a gluten-free diet to avoid permanent damage to the gut.

The new study, by Ivano Bertini and colleagues, is stirring up the discussion about just which patients with symptoms of celiac disease should follow a gluten-free diet.

Their research shows that people currently diagnosed as "potential" celiac disease patients and not advised to follow a gluten-free diet may not be "potential" patients at all.

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Celiac disease is widely regarded as undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. For their study, the researchers used magnetic resonance metabolic profiling to analyze the biochemical markers in the blood and urine of 61 patients with celiac disease, 29 with potential celiac disease, and 51 healthy people.

The researchers found that people with unproven celiac disease largely shared the same profile as those with confirmed celiac disease and that the biochemical markers in both groups differed sharply from those of healthy individuals.

The researchers conclude that their findings "demonstrate that metabolic alterations may precede the development of small intestinal villous atrophy and provide a further rationale for early institution of gluten-free diet in patients with potential celiac disease, as recently suggested by prospective clinical studies."

The authors do note receiving funding from Boehringer Ingelheim Italy.

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2 Responses:

 
Teresa
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said this on
27 Dec 2010 10:41:27 PM PDT
I would like to know if the patients had any celiac blood panels done, and whether those with the similar metabolic panels as celiacs already had developed antibodies, and whether they were followed up with biopsy... and what they showed. It is not cost effective to test everyone with any one of a dozen or more symptoms... so what will become the best screening tool?

 
Will Smith
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said this on
30 Dec 2010 5:54:30 AM PDT
I do not have celiac disease-wrong genes, no villi damage However, I am highly gluten intolerant. I have lost half of my kidney function from IgA Nephropathy caused by gluten reactions. Mayo Clinic routinely checks people with this condition for celiac disease, but there is no check for gluten intolerance. Have your doctor monitor your kidney function if you are gluten intolerant and continue to eat it anyway.




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Oh, yes! It just takes time. I know, hard to hear, but it took a lot of time for your symptoms to develop. Most members feel noticeably better in a few weeks. Just rest as much as possible. Spend time learning the Gluten free diet. There is a steep learning curve to the diet. Want to shorten it? Eat as much Whole Foods as possible. Think stews and soups. Things that are easy to digest. Eliminate dairy until you start to feel better and then re-introduce it. Many celiacs become lactose intolerant because the enzymes that help digest lactose are released from villi tips. Not villi, no enzymes (or at least a reduction based on patchy damage). Do not eat out for a while! Hang in there!

Celiac disease is associated with numerous chronic conditions, such as anemia and malabsorption of some critical vitamins. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract, rates of gastric emptying, and gastric pH are responsible for impaired vitamin and mineral absorption. Intestinal CYP3A4 levels may also be disrupted, which may have implications in first-pass metabolism for some drugs that are substrates for this drug metabolizing enzyme. View the full article

Thank you for posting this I've never been to South America, it's the only continent, bar the poles, I've yet to visit. It's really nice to read that my gluten sensitivity hasn't ruled it out. Maybe I'll get to the land of Luis Suarez yet!

I know this post is a year ago... however it is still on the first page of the travel section! I am from Uruguay, (South America) and I can answer this question for people that may look at it in the future. As a South American - I can say that the cuisine varies greatly. In cities, you shouldn't have any more than the normal amount of difficulty finding food. For example, in Montevideo, the city I am from, you'll have no problem finding dedicated entire Celiac stores. Meat is a large part of restaurant menus, so parilladas (similar in theory to steakhouses, would be very easy to navigate). Uruguayans do eat a lot of pastries, and just like in the states... Most mainstream bakeries are not gluten free, but like I mentioned there are places that specialize. In Uruguay, there is knowledge of Celiac and a large health awareness. Some of the foods can be costly, cost of living in general is not low. In large swaths of South America, the foods you mentioned - Potatoes, rice, meat, etc are abundant, as are fresh fruits and veggies. Avoiding corn does make it tricky. Peru can be a great place for non-gluten eaters. Peru uses very little gluten (they are the original quinoa eaters) but there is a lot of corn in the diet (and since you are corn sensitive, that would be a food you would need to navigate). Latin America spread over two continents! In this area you will find a great variety in cultures, cuisines, and knowledge of celiac. There is no reason why If you want to experience Latin America, that you have to rule out an entire region of the world because of Celiac. Navigating it will be different, but it is doable!

Recently diagnosed last week does the pain ever get better??