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Could Ultrasound Baking Technology Mean a Better Gluten-free Bun in the Oven?

Photo: CC--DoNotLickCeliac.com 01/06/2012 - The same ultrasound technology that helps doctors and expectant parents to view a developing baby might soon literally mean a better gluten-free bun in the oven.

That's because engineers researching how ultrasound could be used to improve industrial baking have received a UK government grant of £500,000 (about $725,000 U.S. dollars) to commercialize their technology.

The grant from the Technology Strategy Board will support the 25-month project,which will be led by food ingredient manufacturer Macphie of Glenbervie and involve Piezo Composite Transducers, Mono Bakery Equipment and Fosters Bakery.

The engineers, based at Heriot-Watt University, say their technique reduces processing time and improves energy usage, reduces wastage and improves the texture of gluten-free products.

They declined to give details about the exact nature of their technology, and how it worked. However, they did say that ultrasonic waves helped baking dough to regulate its energy and mass balance, which prevents air pockets from forming and helped protect the structure of the dough against collapse.

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Research leader Dr Carmen Torres-Sánchez said that the technology would allow bakers to create products that met current demand for specific ingredients, but which would be much more aesthetically or texturally attractive.

For example, she said, ‘[t]here is a lot of pressure on bakers to reduce salt content and that can affect production, causing an imbalance in osmotic pressure so that the dough becomes very sticky…without gluten, products can collapse and look bad. We can use this technology to tailor the texture of products.’

The lab has researched and developed the technique through several feasibility studies. It is based on methods usually used to control the porosity of industrial materials such as foaming polymer.

‘The big question now is how to scale up the technology,’ said Torres-Sánchez. ‘We’ve been doing semi-continuous batches; now we need to use it continuously, producing up to 1,000 loaves in 30 minutes.’

The team also needs to further examine whether the technique can save energy proportionally as it is scaled up. Torres-Sánchez hopes the project will give rise to ovens and other bakery equipment with built-in ultrasonic technology that can easily be controlled as products are baked.

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1 Response:

 
Dolores Eilers
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
07 Feb 2012 7:36:42 AM PDT
Not in my lifetime.




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I have 2 copies of DQ9. One from each parent.

Obviously from the outside it's difficult to comment, but if I were you I'd leave allergies for now and pursue definitive celiac testing via your doctor and preferably a gastroenterologist. They're the first port of call for digestion issues. If you do wind up being celiac it's possible that other allergies or intolerances would resolve or improve in any case once you've been on the diet for awhile. That's been my experience. Ps note that wheat allergy is completely different and unrelated to celiac or non celiac gluten sensitivity.

Thank you ps, it may be better if the thread title was changed as we now have two 'overwhelmed' topics. If it were 'Bile ducts and celiac?' then it may attract more users with direct experience?

Hello and welcome Maybe? From reading others accounts there's a big variation in how quickly gluten antibodies respond to the gluten diet. I did similar to you and my doctor said that 1 week back on should be enough to show up in a test, but he didn't know what he was talking about sadly... The 2 week figure refers to the endoscopy, for blood testing 8-12 weeks on gluten is more normal. Basically if it comes back positive fine you have your answer. If its negative it may be a false negative due to your going gluten free beforehand. If you want to pursue a diagnosis then yes. Don't go off gluten again until you confirm that all testing is complete. Keep a journal noting any symptoms, that may be useful to you later. More info here: There's some good info in the site faq: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ I know how you feel! Partway through my gluten challenge I knew that too results notwithstanding. Fwiw I think you've found your answer. Good luck!

Learn more about testing for celiac disease here: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ You do have to be on a gluten diet for ANY of the celiac tests (blood and biopsy) to work. While the endoscopy (with biopsies) can reveal villi damage, many other things besides celiac disease can cause villi damage too: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-else-can-cause-damage-to-the-small-intestine-other-than-celiac-disease/ So, both the blood test and endoscopy are usually ordered. There are some exceptions, but those are not common.