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New Medical Language Makes Gluten-Sensitivity and Celiac Disease Separate Disorders

Celiac.com 03/16/2012 - It's official! After an international conference to address gluten-sensitivity, fifteen experts from seven countries have announced the development of a nomenclature and classification system making gluten-sensitivity a distinct and separate condition from celiac disease.

New Medical Language Makes Gluten-Sensitivity and Celiac Disease Separate DisordersTheir work on establishing universal medical terms for gluten-sensitivity may serve as a guide to improve the diagnosis and treatment of gluten-related disorders. The experts have published their conclusions and recommendations in "Spectrum of Gluten-Related Disorders: Consensus on New Nomenclature and Classification," which includes a diagnostic roadmap for clinicians. The new consensus appears in the journal BMC Medicine.

The conference was co-chaired by Alessio Fasano, M.D., professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology and director of the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research (CFCR) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with Carlo Catassi, M.D., M.P.H., co-director of CFCR and professor of pediatrics at the Universita Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona, Italy, and Anna Sapone, M.D., Ph.D., of the Seconda Universita of Naples.

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Gluten sensitivity, a condition causing gastrointestinal distress and other clinical symptoms, has been identified by the international panel of experts as a distinct entity on the spectrum of gluten-related disorders that includes wheat allergy and celiac disease.

“For the first time," says Dr. Catassi, "we have provided an accurate diagnostic procedure for gluten sensitivity. We have confirmed that to correctly diagnose gluten sensitivity, we need to exclude celiac disease and wheat allergy with the appropriate diagnostic tests.”

Whereas about 1 in a hundred or so people has celiac disease, Dr. Fassano estimates about "60 to 70 percent" of the people coming to his clinic for treatment actually suffer from gluten sensitivity.

Overall, an estimated six percent of people of European descent may be affected by gluten sensitivity, which would make it of the most common pathologies in the world today.

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6 Responses:

 
Minnie
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said this on
17 Mar 2012 4:56:03 PM PDT
Very interesting. In order to be diagnosed with non celiac gluten sensitivity, a person has to have negative antibodies, no villi damage, no malabsorption, no gut permeability, but 45 million dollars buys a diagnosis. I've lost all respect for Dr. Fasano.

 
vivienne harris
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said this on
19 Mar 2012 8:34:19 PM PDT
Glad to hear about this, but I need more information on testing to find out about this kind of problem.

 
Kathy Glynn
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said this on
20 Mar 2012 8:12:00 AM PDT
I would like to know more than what this article provided. I would like to know where I fall on the continuum. I have the antibody information provided on the blood test.

 
Phillip Fine
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said this on
24 Mar 2012 1:41:40 PM PDT
Very interesting. I agree with Kathy and Vivienne above. Also, someone please tell me - why on earth isn't big pharma looking for some kind of remedy? The change of eating lifestyle is a huge inconvenience, and the market of people who would pay for a fix to be able to eat what they want again is HUGE. Isn't that worthy of big pharma research?

 
Peggy B.
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said this on
31 Mar 2012 12:22:06 PM PDT
So much less of an inconvenience that in years past! I would much rather ELIMINATE items from my plate than have a pharmaceutical company create ''medication".

 
Lynn_M
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said this on
28 May 2012 9:41:46 PM PDT
As someone with non-celiac gluten sensitivity as confirmed by genome testing, I welcome this development. Currently, I do not fit in a recognized diagnostic category, and in this day and age of everything having a code attached to it, this impairs recognition of the precautions that need to be taken and treatment provided.

I wonder what the criteria will be for classifying patients as gluten sensitive.




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