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Anthony Bourdain Scoffs at Fad Gluten-free Dieters

Celiac.com 06/09/2016 - If you're a fad gluten-free dieter, especially one who hasn't been diagnosed with celiac disease, then definitely don't plan on preaching your gospel to Anthony Bourdain.

AdWeek recently spoke with the celebrity chef, writer and host of CNN's Emmy Award-winning series Parts Unknown.

Adweek talked to Bourdain about everything from Chick-fil-A to Frito pie, to, yes, gluten-free dieters. During the interview, Anthony Bourdain let loose with a few doses vitriol regarding trendy subjects of gluten-free diets, and juicing.

Ads by Google:

Of gluten-free proselytizers, he says: "Look, before you start boring me to death at a party about how you got gluten-free, you know, if you think you have a disease as serious as celiac disease, shouldn't you see a f#&$^%# doctor before you make this big move?"

Honestly, he says, "I don't think half of these people even understand what they're talking about."

Bourdain has one thing right. If you suspect you have celiac disease, then definitely consult a doctor. Otherwise, if he is around, maybe just quietly eat your quinoa.

Read the full interview at AdWeek.

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9 Responses:

 
Ed Arnold
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
10 Jun 2016 6:46:02 AM PDT
Bourdain is just like the doctors: symptoms don't matter, but expensive medical testing does. Typical of the highly-privileged elite.
This is a "light" article that feeds us the usual celebrity crap.

 
Mary
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said this on
13 Jun 2016 12:04:03 PM PDT
I disagree with Mr. Bourdain, and would not eat gluten for weeks just to get a formal diagnosis.

 
Tom
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said this on
13 Jun 2016 3:59:31 PM PDT
Someday he may be diagnosed, or someone close to him, and his whole attitude will change miraculously overnight. Until you have suffered the effects of eating gluten or see a love one go through it, when intolerant or diagnosed with celiac, is a terrible thing to dismiss or made into a joke . Sorry, Anthony, but you are becoming a closed cynical old man and need to open your mind and heart.

 
Gillian
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said this on
14 Jun 2016 2:35:24 AM PDT
Agree entirely with Mary I am in the same position and would not eat gluten again even for a couple of days. Who is this Bourdain guy anyway, never heard of him, (I'm in Europe), so can't be that special just another self made celeb, in a couple of years time no one will remember him!

 
Retta
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said this on
14 Jun 2016 4:30:28 AM PDT
I find is sad that this is Anthony's response to the gluten free diet. I have had digestive and skin issues my whole life. It wasn't until I went gluten free that this problem sorted itself out. I cannot afford an invasive biopsy to test for something that may or may not be proven. I know what my body tells me and if that means no gluten to feel good, then no gluten it is.

 
Terri
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said this on
14 Jun 2016 7:32:44 AM PDT
Anthony Bourdain obviously does not suffer from celiac or non celiac gluten sensitivity. Our doctors here have no clue. I went gluten free because my doctor couldn't figure out what was wrong with me so I was trying to save my life. Then many months later she decided to check for celiac...which if already gluten free does not show up in the test. Since going gluten free the arthritis in my fingers and in my elbow is gone. No more stomach meds or psoriasis or eczema and no more celiac rash that I had almost all my life. Not wishing this on anyone. Does he really think that a person would change from eating wonderful tasting food to bland clean eating for no reason for the rest of their lives....he has no clue.

 
Bette
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said this on
14 Jun 2016 8:51:04 AM PDT
Testing is not very expensive . On a scale of 1-100 I was diagnosed as an 85. My esophagus was already damaged because I had waited. Had I not been diagnosed as celiac and tried to deal with my symptoms instead, I could easily have shortened my life. I object to manufacturers such as jello and mayonnaise who proudly proclaim on their labels that they are gluten free. Let the so called trend setters give up gluten, but let them shut up about it. God help them if they ever have to give up bone marrow or broth and duck fat fries. P.S. Anthony, I am a great fan of yours and always have been.

 
Haley
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said this on
17 Jun 2016 7:57:15 AM PDT
Bette thank goodness for your comments. This was all Anthony was saying -- trends!!! It's not something to impose on everyone else, just offer dairy free, gluten free, vegetarian... options when having guests over!

 
Cherri Nelson
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said this on
07 Jul 2016 10:23:15 AM PDT
I now tell people, "so your going to drive me to the emergency room and pay the bill tomorrow if I eat that"?
Fed Up!!! To give the benefit of doubt to most people, they don't know that's it's a medical issue for those of us having to live this way or suffer severe consequences.
I just discovered, the hard way, that I have to be careful using NSAIDs. I developed problems, stomach aches, stopped up, & really foggy brain (general confusion), after taking ibuprofen for tennis elbow for a couple of weeks. It took a long time to find the GF version, had to order it on Amazon, a standard medication people pop for headaches etc. That's d…n scary!
This is NOT A FAD for us!




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I believe the talk around this forum is that cheerios are not gluten free enough for people with celiac at this time. I don't know if anything has changed on that and when their lawyer calls me I'll quickly delete this. haha

Could be we generally say get off of dairy for a few months when going gluten free. The part of the intestines that produce the enzymes, and help break down dairy are associated with the tips of the villi, which are the most damaged if not gone in celiacs. THIS is why most of us end up with a lactose intolerance early on. And most can introduce it later after healing. As to her symptoms with it there was a bunch of research about dairy permeated the gut and causing neurological issues in a autism study I was looking at years ago. And there have been other studies about damaged intestines and how the hormones in milk can easier effect ones body. Personally I also have a huge grudge against dairy on a personal level as it is not natural to suck on a cows tits and drink the stuff, nor your dogs, nor a rabbits......I mean come on even Human Breast milk you would find odd to drink as an adult right? Back in the past dairy was a great way to get calories and fats when there was famine, etc around I mean it is meant to make a calf grow into a 500+lb cow. But on a genetic and hormonal level it is not really for human consumption and now days the whole corporate BS propaganda push and dairy farms shove that oh its healthy stuff down your throat. There are plenty of dairy free options for everything feel free to message me if you need help finding anything I have been dairy free for over a decade.

The full celiac panel checks TTG IGA and IGG, DGP IGA and IGG, IGA, EMA as Jmg stated above. Your test included TTG IGA and IGA. If your IGA was low, a low on TTG IGA would be inconclusive. But your IGA is fine. A high on any one test is a positive for celiac and should lead to an endoscopy for confirmation. So I'd get tested for TTG IGG, DGP IGA and IGG and EMA since there are symptoms. Warning I'm not a doc.

I did a gluten challenge for my endoscopy and requested a second blood test after my follow up with the consultant. I never did see those results but my GP said no celiac was indicated: Which left me gluten free for life, that wasn't an option after the challenge, but with a less satisfactory diagnosis, one by omission rather than the definitive 'you're celiac' one I was expecting. Yes! I have been 'properly' glutened on a couple of occasions but on several more I've detected a change or a reaction based on what could only have been trace amounts. NCGS is as yet poorly understood but patients tend to have more neuro symptoms than digestive. That's definitely been my experience, although it was only after going gluten free that I realised quite how many digestive symptoms I had just been living with as 'normal'. Close friends and family get the full explanation. 'I have an auto immune disease similar to 'coeliac etc.' If they stay awake long enough I'll tell them about the less than perfect testing process I went through or the Columbia Med research and the possibility of a blood test soon. They can see the difference between me on gluten and off it so they understand its not all in my head* If I'm ordering food in a restauarant or asking questions about food prep etc I will often just self declare as coeliac - people are aware of that and understand those requests are medical rather than fad diet based. I don't have any problem doing this, I'm not going to claim that and then cheat on dessert for instance and to be honest I expect once the research is complete the two conditions may wind up alongside others as different faces of the same coin. In the meantime I safeguard my health and avoid getting into a detailed conversation about genuine gluten sensitivity versus faux hipster posturing! *apart from the bits which are in my head

I originally had it on my face and scalp. (22 years ago) First biopsy with dermatologist came back as folliculitis. Then when I had a new outbreak on my upper back, she was able to remove a nice clean blister and we got the diagnosis of DH. She started me on Dapsone (100mg/day) and gluten free diet. Now I take 25-50 mg/day. My understanding at the time was that DH was the skin version of Celiac. Did a lot of research on my own. I met Dr. Peter Green at a Gluten free Vendors Fair and he said that a diagnosis of DH IS a diagnosis of Celiac, even if no other symptoms. So I stay gluten-free