No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Many Celiac Patients Diagnosed in Childhood Do Not Seek Follow-up care as Adults


Photo: CC--Sage Ross

Celiac.com 07/08/2016 - If their symptoms don't get worse, many patients diagnosed with celiac disease as children do not pursue follow-up care as adults, according to data presented at Digestive Disease Week 2016.

There's been some really good stuff coming out of Digestive Disease Week 2016 in San Diego. One example is a talk given by Norelle Reilly, MD, from the division of pediatric gastroenterology and the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

According to data presented by Dr. Reilly many patients diagnosed with celiac disease as children do not pursue follow-up gastroenterology care as adults, unless symptoms worsen.

Reilly and colleagues sent a 33-question survey to nearly 8,000 recipients via the medical center's proprietary distribution list and received 98 qualified responses.

Ads by Google:

According to Reilly, 37% of respondents said they were not seeking ongoing care for celiac disease. These respondents reported an average of 2 to 5 years, and sometimes as many as 10 years, between doctor visits for their celiac disease. Compare that with an average of six months between doctor visits for people who were getting regular care.

Large numbers of patients diagnosed with celiac disease in childhood do not seek follow-up care as adults, especially those diagnosed earlier in childhood, who may have fewer ongoing symptoms, Reilly said.Â

She ended her talk by asking "providers caring for children and adolescents with celiac disease [to] educate early as to the importance of ongoing care, emphasize the importance of follow-up and the reasons for follow-up, particularly with patients who lack symptoms and may not seek care otherwise and to provide a referral, and formally transition the patient to adult care to improve compliance."

Reference: Reilly N, et al. Abstract #35. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-24, 2016; San Diego.

Read more at Helio.com.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Dave
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
22 Jul 2016 2:27:40 PM PDT
Dr. Riley sent out 8,000 surveys and got 98 back. So 7,902 did not respond. Sorry, the methodology was flawed. We have no idea why the nearly 80 times as many respondents chose not to respond. If the survey was perceived as irrelevant to just 1-2% of these (over 100), any conclusion based on just 98 responses is noise.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


The AGA/IgA and AGA/IgG tests are reliable and I am not sure why some consider them not as reliable. They are just the older versions of the current DGP testing, which is more sensitive than the AGA testing. I have full blown Celiac Disease and I failed both AGA tests at diagnosis by high numbe...

Whitepaw, I also meant to say that my friend who has been having gastritis issues since the winter (now it seems to be getting better after tapering off Lanzaprazole and introducing more natural remedies) told me that she used to feel acid in her stomach first thing, too. It is good to know that...

So I have another son with a different autoimmune disorder (jia). But my brother has type one diabetes which I've read is gene related to celiac. I myself have been tested for celiac twice because I have gastro issues with it but it has always been negative. Yes they said it may be while. H...

With omeprazole I never felt entirely good really - some time every day I felt off, but I think it might have been the bloating. Perhaps I never gave it long enough. Yet that nauseous feeling and diarrhea carried on for a few days after I stopped taking it. Now on day four of Ranitidine/Za...

Re: food diary. That is a really good way of keeping a food diary - I always thought it was a question of just scribbling everything down. But categorising things into what one can always tolerate, sometimes tolerate, never tolerate is such a good way of making things seem clearer. Re:...