No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Are Cockroaches the Key to Gluten-free Bread Nirvana?

Is flour made from the lowly cockroach the new gold-standard for gluten-free baking?


Will flour from cockroaches be the future of gluten-free baking? Photo: CC--SiamesePuppy

Celiac.com 03/09/2017 - It's cheaper, more nutritious, and properly delicious. Will gluten-free flour made from cockroaches change the way bread is made?

There's a great article over at Munchies. It's about two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil, who have developed flour made from ground cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour. Oh, and it happens to be gluten-free. Excited yet? Grossed out?

As part of their research, food engineering students Andressa Lucas and Lauren Menegon discovered a new way of producing cheaper, more nutritious food with the cockroach flour, since it contains a large amount of essential amino acids and some lipids and fatty acids as well—the keys for a balanced and healthy human diet.

Ads by Google:

These cockroaches are not the ones we find running or flying in city sewers or drains. They are a particular species, Nauphoeta cinerea, to be precise, and procured from a specialized breeder, where they are hygienically produced and fed on fruits and vegetables to meet all hygiene requirements required by ANVISA, the Brazilian health surveillance agency.

So, these are certified clean cockroaches, okay? And not only is the flour itself gluten-free, it's extremely high protein. Lucas and Menegon found that a bread containing just 10% cockroach flour presented a protein increase of 49.16 percent, when compared to bread made only with wheat flour. Also, at that ratio, the cockroach flour bread loaves keep the same flavor as their non-insect counterparts.

So, given the high protein, and the desirable elastic qualities, it seems a natural for someone to test out some gluten-free breads that use cockroach flour. We promise you updates on these and other gluten-free stories. Meantime? Tell us what you think. It obviously sounds gross, but what if cockraoch flour makes good gluten-free bread? Are you in or out?

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).










Related Articles



13 Responses:

 
Erogo
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
09 Mar 2017 9:29:11 AM PDT
Very intriguing, they did have issues keeping cricket flour GF due to a grain diet. This seems quite plausible and I would give it a try.

 
AV Walters
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Mar 2017 8:52:02 AM PDT
Many celiacs have concomitant allergies--arising out of leaky gut. If shellfish is one of your allergies, you might want to think twice about insect based flours--their chitin coatings can trigger the same kind of allergic response.

 
Judy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Mar 2017 8:52:37 AM PDT
NO, NO, NO, NO!! - Ugh!

 
Maverita
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Mar 2017 10:19:15 AM PDT
For some of us who are GF with additional food sensitivities and allergies -- how would they guarantee no chitin? Chitin is highly allergenic. I could probably get used to eating bug flour, but not if it was just another allergen. I already can't eat any of the the GF items out there which have soy, or xanthum gum, or peanut oil, or canola oil, or amaranth, or spelt, or anything from the grass family, including bamboo shoots.

 
Tickmenot
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Mar 2017 12:42:45 PM PDT
A complete thumbs down on this.

 
Daryl
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Mar 2017 7:31:26 PM PDT
I wonder how will the cockroach wheat affect people with a cockroach allergy?

 
CINTHIA BAEZ
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
14 Mar 2017 1:11:59 AM PDT
Hate the idea, NO Thank you I prefer to never eat bread again.

 
Ryan Michaels
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
14 Mar 2017 2:41:12 AM PDT
Cockroach flour, I'm in.

 
Dee
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
14 Mar 2017 4:44:01 AM PDT
If you have not, check out a book by Menzel and D'Aluisio, called, "Man Eating Bugs, the Art and Science of Eating Insects", your entire family will love it.rnIf our planet is to survive our inability to self regulate this crazy need to over populate, we will need to find a more sustainable source of protein. Crickets, spiders, ants, grub, there are millions of edibles out there for the taking. rnMost everyone I know have an eeeuw factor, including myself, but I do want to eat bugs, I would feel less guilty eating bugs than I do chicken. Personally, I would like to eat bugs as a high protein snack food, something less processed than flour for bread. The new chip of the month. Cockroaches have such a bad reputation--could be a hard sell, but I like it! Someone is thinking!

 
Marci
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
14 Mar 2017 3:58:21 PM PDT
I'd give roach bread a try. I'm sure that it is at least as good as some of the other gluten free bread that I've eaten, and if it is more nutritious, why not!?

 
Bebe
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
14 Mar 2017 8:31:49 PM PDT
No way. The article turned my stomach.

 
Gillian
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Mar 2017 8:25:28 AM PDT
UGH! no thanks, I'll stick with my own home made GF bread which is delicious, contains maize starch,tapioca starch,banana flour and ground flax seed which together pack in quite a few nutrients. Anyway as I see it there is already enough food to feed the world but there is very bad organization which makes industrial nations waste so much and poorer nations die of starvation.

 
Fern
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Mar 2017 7:31:06 PM PDT
Ive eaten the bad kind too (not kidding). So sign me up. If its like bread I'm there. I do eat Udi's but not that often. I miss bread. I've been celiac since 2006. Never goes away....




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Thank you JMG!

Certainly seems likely if those levels dropped due to gluten removal. I am just curious, when you had the scope eventually, were you eating it? Are you feeling any better?

1. Double checked your antibodies? 2. Those of us with celiac have issues with some nutrients for various reasons, being either we can not absorb enough of them from our foods due to damage to intestines or the new gluten-free foods you changed to are non fortified and do not contain the nut...

I'm going to play Captain NCGS to Posterboy's Professor Pellagra (No doubt the Marvel and DC Cinematic Universes will soon be bidding for our services) and say that regardless of the blood test results, this: is exhibit one. You have a reaction to the gluten free diet. That doesn't necess...

I think he's right. It's a hard burden at times at any age but there will be particular challenges for your daughter as kids don't want to stick out or have to be continually monitoring things like their food. Check out this advert from a UK retailer. Beware it's so sugary it could probably give ...