Celiac.com Sponsors:

Celiac.com Sponsor:
No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsors:
 
Celiac.com Sponsor:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Is a Reovirus Infection a Prime Cause of Celiac Disease?

Reovirus infection triggers inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and development of celiac disease.


Photo: CC--Yuri Samoilov

Celiac.com 04/17/2017 - A team of researchers recently set out to test this hypothesis and to gain insights into mechanisms underlying virus-induced loss of tolerance to dietary antigens. To do so, they developed a viral infection model that makes use of two reovirus strains that infect the intestine, but which differ in their immunopathological outcomes.

The research team included Romain Bouziat, Reinhard Hinterleitner, Judy J. Brown, Jennifer E. Stencel-Baerenwald, Mine Ikizler, Toufic Mayassi, Marlies Meisel, Sangman M. Kim, Valentina Discepolo, Andrea J. Pruijssers, Jordan D. Ernest, Jason A. Iskarpatyoti, Léa M. M. Costes, Ian Lawrence, Brad A. Palanski, Mukund Varma, Matthew A. Zurenski, Solomiia Khomandiak, Nicole McAllister, Pavithra Aravamudhan, Karl W. Boehme, Fengling Hu, Janneke N. Samsom, Hans-Christian Reinecker, Sonia S. Kupfer, Stefano Guandalini, Carol E. Semrad, Valérie Abadie, Chaitan Khosla, Luis B. Barreiro, Ramnik J. Xavier, Aylwin Ng, Terence S. Dermody, and Bana Jabri.

Reoviruses usually infect humans and mice without overt physical symptoms. Prior research by Bouziat et al., has shown that immune responses to two gut-infecting reoviruses take different paths in mice, as noted in the Perspective by Verdu and Caminero.

Both reoviruses triggered protective immune responses. However, when one of the reoviruses occurred in the presence of a dietary antigen, such as gluten or ovalbumin, tolerance to the dietary antigen disappeared. This was because this strain blocked the formation of tolerogenic T cells. Instead, it promoted T helper 1 immunity to the dietary antigen through interferon regulatory factor 1 signaling. Moreover, celiac disease patients also showed elevated levels of antibodies against reovirus.

Reovirus is an avirulent pathogen that elicits protective immunity, but these researcher have shown that it can also cause a disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis at inductive and effector sites of oral tolerance by suppressing peripheral regulatory T cell (pTreg) conversion, and promoting TH1 immunity to dietary antigen. TH1 immunity to dietary antigen depended on interferon regulatory factor 1, and was unconnected to suppression of pTreg conversion, which was mediated by type-1 interferon.

Ads by Google:

This study provides important scientific support for the idea that this seemingly mild reovirus plays a major role in the development of celiac disease.

Clearly further study is needed to determine the exact nature of the role of reovirus in celiac disease, and to determine if these connections might prompt any changes in celiac diagnosis and treatment.

Source:

 

 

The researchers are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, the Department of Pathology, and the Committee on Immunology at the University of Chicago in Chicago, IL, USA; the Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Elizabeth B. Lamb Center for Pediatric Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, USA; the Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Section of Pediatrics, University of Naples Federico II, and CeInGe–Biotecnologie Avanzate, Naples, Italy; the Laboratory of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands; the Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Unit and Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; the Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; the Department of Microbiology, Infectiology, and Immunology, University of Montreal, and the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; the Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; the Stanford ChEM-H, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA; the Department of Genetics, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; the Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; the Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; and the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).










Related Articles



1 Response:

 
coloradosue
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
24 Apr 2017 9:57:29 PM PDT
Like I have been saying since my diagnosis in 2004, my celiac disease developed shortly after exposure (from someone I worked for) to a virus that then developed into double pnuemonia. However, I suspect that over the years, I displayed the typical symptoms of dermatitis herpetiformis and other milder symptoms typical of celiac disease, but thought that the symptoms were indicative of something else. And I had had pneumonia before but did not "turn my CD on" until the last exposure to the virus that caused my pneumonia in 2004. So the question(s) are what type of virus caused the changes? I would like answers to that and many other questions. The same happened to my only child and one of my grandson. Both had viral indications. Both had their CD turned on. How about it researchers --- can you answer those questions for us and many other people who have the same questions!!!!!!




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


The Bakery On Main story began in the back of Owner, Michael Smulders' Natural Food Store in Glastonbury, CT. Many of his customers with Celiac Disease would visit the bakery and mention the lack of good-tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, Michael Smulders believed...

I used to drink Guinness, sometimes a half-n-half over Harp or Bass. I call Sam Adams a good light beer, and probably gave up on Budwiper and the like 30 years ago. So while it is nice to find companies making lots of "Yeah, that almost tastes like cheapo beer"....There's not a one of them that c...

Megan- I am not Catholic but I owe my gluten awareness to whoever was the Pope in 2004. There was a BIG piece in the national nooze media about some Roman Catholic girl in NJ who had celiac. Her parents were told by her priest and bishop that she should take the communion wafer anyway, and ...

....yeah that is the sad story of many of us...I think I went through what was it 6 doctors? or was it 7. I ran into one JUST like that 4 doctors ago. She was very condescending, and this was before my celiac dia. She practically worshiped the whole eat all whole grains, avoid dairy lifestyle. Sh...

I've had it twice and it was served to me different each time. The first time it was served warm in a sealed bag. The second time it was served warm, not in a sealed bag, but on their traditional paper. I should have refused the possible contaminated order, but I was hungry and in a hurry so I ac...