No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Can Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Help People with Celiac Disease?

Can gluten-sniffing dogs make life better for sensitive celiac patients?


Zeus, an Australian Shepherd like the one pictured here, has learned to warn its owner if food contains gluten. Photo: CC--Paul Schadler

Celiac.com 07/12/2017 - Humans rely on powerful canine noses to do so many things, including sniffing for drugs, bombs and even cancer.

Now, some dogs are being trained to serve their masters by sniffing out gluten.

Trained to help some of the 3 million Americans who have celiac disease, gluten sniffing dogs can be a tremendous boon to their owners, especially those who are highly sensitive.

One such person is Evelyn Lapadat, a 13-year-old Indiana girl with celiac disease that leaves her with joint pain, stiffness and fatigue when she eats even tiny amounts of gluten.

Ads by Google:

Now, thanks to Zeus, her Australian shepherd, Evelyn rarely has an issue with gluten. That's because Zeus has been trained to sniff out even tiny amounts of gluten in food. Zeus stays by Evelyn's side throughout the day at school, checking her hands and sniffing her food.

Zeus has learned to raise his paw if he smells gluten. If the food is safe, then Zeus turns his head.

“I haven't gotten sick in a really long time and it's like a really big relief,” Evelyn said.

Maybe one day dogs like Zeus will be much more common.

See more at NBCNews.com

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



4 Responses:

 
James
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Jul 2017 7:52:06 AM PST
Where was the dog trained? How?

 
Tara
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Jul 2017 12:02:00 PM PST
I would like to have a doggy that would keep me safe from gluten.

 
KKJ
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Jul 2017 12:54:44 PM PST
Yes, I'd like to know that as well.

 
Wendy Lapadat
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
31 Jul 2017 7:44:49 AM PST
Hi, I'm Wendy (Ev and Zeus' mom). He was trained thru Nosey Dog Detection Partners- trainer Kathy Watters. It took 10 mos of training and he started at age 4 mos!




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Thought cyrex is very similar to a celiac testing panel? Mostly I was just curious if IGG test results are worth anything as an indicator. I've read they can just indicate that you're actually tolerate or have recent eaten the foods (I was prior to the test).

The other alternative is just eliminating it from your diet and seeing if you do end up feeling better. There?s a chance your not celiacs and could be intolerant which is just as bad for reactions but can?t be proven with the celiac testing. It depends on how bad you would feel eating it every ...

I am the only one in my immediate family (out of my 3 siblings and both parents) to have celiacs even thought I inherited the autoimmune thyroid issues from my parents, but have a second cousin who was diagnosed 8 years ago and that?s it.

One other thought to consider is other food allergies/intolerances you may have that you didn?t know of before that could be causing this change. Is there any food that you may have added in or increased the frequency of eating since removing gluten from your diet? I know this has happened with...

Hey I?m new here too- but totally get what your talking about! I have some friends that claim to be ?gluten free? but if they are hungry will eat a piece of bread and it can be frustrating to have them later complain to you about how hard it is to eat a gluten-free diet!