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momIM12

Need To Get New Pans

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Okay so I was a little say "miffed" by the whole get new pans, toaster, cookware concept. I told myself I don't need to do that. I was totally wrong. I made a pan of Black bean brownie's last night, which was my first venture in baking since being diagnosed about a week and half ago, and they turned out good.  But then today I kept feeling like I had been glutened and I knew I hadn't eaten anything I wasn't supposed too. So my baking pans are the only thing I can narrow it down to. So I guess I will be going shopping this week for some new bakeware. Hopefully Kohls has a good sale. :)

 

Jessica

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You were diagnosed a week and a half ago. The healing process has just begun. During that process, reactions may occur from your damaged intestines to almost any food. Do not assume a problem with your pans this early on. Beans can be hard to digest at times, even if your intestines are not damaged.  :wacko:

 

For sure you need to replace the toaster, but other things--maybe not. I would give it some more time.

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I agree with psawyer. The only thing I replaced when I was diagnosised was my toaster, everything else can be scrubbed and washed well to remove any specks of gluten that may be hiding. I even use a pan handed down by a family member with no problems with croos contamination. I just scrubbed it good and washed it well.

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Besides the toaster, I replaced my wooden spoons, pancake turner, scrapers (anything plastic) and my cutting boards (I was a big bread maker) and tossed my cupcake pans (too many crevices).  My glass bakeware and stainless sheets I kept.   I also purchased a new colander.  

 

When I was visiting my family, I brought along parchment paper to bake on (cookies) and to line the brownie pan.  It works well and allows you to pull the brownies out of the pan and then cut them easily out of the pan.  Cookies bake better on parchment -- less sticking with the gluten-free flours.  I also bought a few cooking things to leave there, clearly marked "gluten free".  

 

Just scrub out your own pots and pans well and you shouldn't gluten yourself.  If there are lots of cut marks on an aluminum pan, I'd toss it.

 

I did purchase a lot, but then I figured that I deserved some new things since my stuff was ancient! (Helped the grieving process a little!)

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Congratulations on getting a diagnosis and starting down the right path.

That first month is sure to be full of accidental glutenings so I wouldn't beat myself up too badly about it. Gluten is hidden in so many foods (and kitchen utensils) that it can be tough to get rid of hidden sources right away. Just keep at it. In three or four months, the accidental glutenings should be few and far between. You'll become a pro at reading labels and knowing what to look for and you'll get the kitchen items figured out.

When it comes to pans, I'd get rid of any that have non-stick coating and I'd be wary of pans made of softer metals that have deep pitting. Track down information about how to cleanse and recondition the cast iron. But the rest that are made of smooth metal - they can be cleaned.

That said, if you're still sharing a kitchen with others who aren't gluten free, I'd consider rewashing even those before you use them to make your own food, every time.

Wooden spoons, cutting boards, even plastic spatulas (anything porous) would be suspect.
 

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In addition to the great suggestions above, you may wish to clean any electric can openers like crazy or invest in a new one. Gobs of ick can hide in there!

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