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Daily Free Eating In Classroom?

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I am enjoying the information available in this link, 10 essential school resources for food allergy parents.

 

http://blog.foodallergy.org/2015/08/17/10-essential-school-resources-for-food-allergy-parents/

 

It is disappointing that the CDC recommendations do not address celiac disease, as I think the principles of inclusive and safe schooling should apply.

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That 12 reasons not to have a peanut free school writer is a real whack job.  I would guess she is a psychopath, as she clearly has NO empathy for other humans (small children of school age)  I have never met a person who had "entitlement issues" because they avoid an allergen for medical reasons.

 

It sounds as if Her "picky eater" child has demanded peanuts and she is unable to maintain any reason or logical thinking, so she is declaring it everyone but her own problem.  As if eating nuts is a God given right, even if it is risking death for other humans in the room.  ~ I just can't take this obnoxious force it down your throat opinion seriously.

 

Kharma may be the only thing that can teach her humility.  She has closed comments to her "articles".  I have no doubt that she is unwilling to listen to any opposing opinions or logic for that matter.

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"There are other types of food-related conditions and diseases that range from the frequent problem of digesting lactose in milk, resulting in gas, bloating, and diarrhea, to reactions caused by cereal grains (celiac disease) that can result in severe malabsorption and a variety of other serious health problems. These conditions and diseases may be serious but are not immediately life-threatening and are not addressed in these guidelines."

 

 

That is why Celiac isn't addressed in the voluntary CDC guidelines.

 

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Yes, the CDC guidelines specify their exclusion of celiac disease.  But should immediately life threatening medical conditions be treated substantially different from chronically life threatening ones?

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My daughter was hospitalized for dehydration numerous times. She is Celiac and also has Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE). Dehydration is very serious and the body does start a shutting down process to protect vital organs.  She would just start vomiting and within 2 to 3 hours she was severely dehydrated.  sunken eyes, chapped lips lethargic, and it gets really hard to find a vein to put an I.V. into

 

I did end up taking her out of private school and she now does public school over the internet.  I just wasn't willing to see her suffer from accidental exposure to allergens some of which may not easily identified because of possible airborne allergens that may have been involved with EE.  The private school was very diligent, but some other situations with parents were as outrageous as that blogger.  (girl scout leader, parent volunteer, and so on)

 

I just couldn't fight ignorance everywhere and risk her health.  I never planned on "home schooling" but now the health benefits, flexible schedule, and the piece of mind that she is learning all of her lessons fully, and extra time for 4 H and advanced learning situations/outings (university extension weekend seminars). 

 

There are other options available when the local public school district is unwilling to work with you.  My personal opinion... this free range eating all day in every class is just stupid.  The classrooms and equipment will be filthy and not a lot of workplaces will allow employees to free range eat all day.

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"There are other types of food-related conditions and diseases that range from the frequent problem of digesting lactose in milk, resulting in gas, bloating, and diarrhea, to reactions caused by cereal grains (celiac disease) that can result in severe malabsorption and a variety of other serious health problems. These conditions and diseases may be serious but are not immediately life-threatening and are not addressed in these guidelines."

 

 

I don't expect you to agree with their reasoning.  These two conditions work in very different ways.  If the leading celiac disease specialists and hospitals and manufacturers want to fund another set of guidelines, that's great. These things cost a lot of money.  The FDA can't even get it together enough to make manufacturers label for gluten as a top 8.

 

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