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jlr

Rate Of Digestion/levels Of Intolerance

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Hi all,

This is my first post and I have really learned a lot on these boards - thanks, I was diagnosed about a month ago (just the blood test) and I have an appointment with a GI specialist in a week. I have started the diet and I do feel much better - but I have had some episodes, I am trying to track my diet to see if I can pinpoint what is bothering me but I keep wondering how much of a factor is rate of digestion - I have a very slow rate and I often think I maybe indentifying the wrong triggers.

Could something I ate last night be the trigger of an episode the following night? or is it usually the meal before the episode?

Also, are their levels of intolerance? Are some people more intolerant than others? I have been reading some of the posts and I am amazed to hear that just sharing a plate with someone who had a wheat product on their fingers could cause an attack!! That must be horrible.

Thanks for any help/insight you can provide.

Janet

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Hi Janet--welcome in. As you know from reading here a while, we all are different when it comes to our reactions and our levels of sensitivity. Some, like me, get symptoms from gluten soon after ingesting it. Its not uncommon for it to take longer. It is possible for a reaction to be a day or even two after. Some are very sensitive and get a reaction from a tiny bit of gluten or from cross contamination. Some are less so. The important thing to keep in mind is that no matter how you feel after a gluten accident, even if you don't get sick, there is damage being done to your intestine. Keeping track of your food at the beginning is a good idea. Be careful, too, with your shampoo, soap, lotions, etc. Believe me, they find their way into your mouth! Good luck with your appt. next week--feel free to ask anytime :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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It seems that everyone has their own level of sensitivity. You should also take a very close look at the ingredients of everything you eat. Also, skin/hair care products can cause a reaction, so you need to check those too.

It took about six months for me to experience any improvement, while others find relief in a matter of a few days. It may be that you system is still clearing out some stuff. It depends on your particulars, like how much damage has been done to your gut and such. There is no standard measure, so you just need to be careful and patient.

The time to react differs from person to person as well, so it could be any meal you had, maybe even days prior. The general trend from what I've been reading is a reaction within 24 hours, and lasting up to two weeks. Sometimes the culprit is discovered, while other times it is not. Over time you'll get better at it. Just don't get discouraged, and by all means don't ever cheat.

You may notice a reaction from other foods like dairy, eggs, soy, sugar, and many more after going gluten-free. That's quite common, and it seems that it may be that the problem was always there for some, but just overshadowed by the gluten issue. Sometimes it is because the damage to the intestine makes digestion of other foods problematic, at least until some healing takes place. This seems to be the case with dairy. From what I've read, lactose is one of the first things that cannot be digested as damage occurs.

I hope this site helps you get the information you need for full recovery.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Thanks so much for the replies! This really has been overwhelming - I am a single mom of a 5 year old boy (who so far has zero symptoms) so I am always cooking two meals one for him and one for me - it has been hard keeping it all straight!

It definitely sounds like a highly personalized disease - one that I will have to continue to monitor and learn about my own reactions and stimuli.

This site has been great for information and to know that I am not alone in this journey!

THANKS AGAIN.

Janet

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Hi Janet, and Welcome :)

Yes, everyone has a different level of tolerance. I do not have celiac, but have been diagnosed with a gluten intolerance with no damage to intestines. I also have a dairy intolerance, which I'm sure you've learned usually goes hand in hand with gluten intolerance.

If I eat gluten, I usually get a itchy rash followed by gi problems the next day. I'm the same with dairy. It also depends on how much was consumed. If I accidentally ate a small amount, I usually have no problems.But as you have read on this forum, some people can't even touch things with gluten or use products with it. They'll be sick for weeks. My son also has gluten intolerance, and has the same reaction as me. Diarrhea the next morning. I usually watch what I eat the next day, so I don't further aggravate my gi tract. NO coffee, tea,sugar,etc. I will then be fine the day following. I take my gluten-free diet seriously and will remain on it for life. I don't want to take the chance of future damage to the villi in my intestines.

Good luck, :) and remember this is a healthy change, and it gets easier with time!!

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Hi

There are other foods that my husband who has celiac cannot tolerate. So it might not all be gluten but other sources (like milk, corn, soy, etc.) that are bothering you.

D.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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