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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Jherm21

Thanksgiving

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This is my first year diagnosed as a celiac. So at first I was in a ba-humbug mood about it and just thought ill just eat my usual boring food.  But then I got into spirit I, would like to go to town like the pilgrims and Indians did. So what are you guy's feasts like? Oh and brands for everything that's not fresh fruit veggies and meats I need product names😋 thanks everyone!

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Check back on the post from the past, I did one 1-2 years ago with the recipes for my dressings etc I think. I use Riverside turkey says no gluten...I do not eat it but I know I can cook it for the family safely. I use Authentic Foods Potato starch for dusting the pans, thickening gravies, dusting the turkey bag (a turkey bag can be used in the oven to cook the bird and you do not have to baste it). I also used to use authentic foods garfava flour to make a cornbread/dressing bread knock off. Using my keto bread this year. I am also making keto diner rolls this year. Delmonte makes safe green beans, I am cooking with a local gluten-free store brand of bacon in the pot and I use either pacific brand or kitchen basics stocks. Big Tree Farms coconut sugar is used to fix stuff for the family desserts, use my own pie crust (recipe in the recipe section) I have used libby pumpkin but am using a local HEB organics version this year for making they pie. Most everything else is whole fresh foods. OH and spicely organics poultry seasoning, along with some of the the original liquid smoke on the turkey. Nutivia Butter Flavored Coconut oil is used under the skin and over the breast, and for cooking everywhere in the kitchen.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/116449-thanksgiving-2016/

 

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I would be happy to email you all of my recipes that I've collected over the last 5 years for Thanksgiving (and my Christmas recipes if needed). I have some super easy (i.e make ahead and crockpot friendly) and tasty recipes for everything: turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc. 

Product specific, I do like the Udi's classic French dinner rolls.

 

 

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This year I have to go easy. So I'm cooking a turkey thigh (assuming they sell those at the store), zucchini cooked with olive oil and salt, and homemade gravy. Etalia artisan style bread (boule), and pumpkin pie. Will space these things throughout the day as I can only eat small amounts at a time.

Gravy:

2Tbsp butter

2Tbsp Pamelas flour

2 cups homemade chicken broth

salt to taste

Stir butter and flour with a whisk in a fry pan with heat on. Slowly add broth while stirring, salt to taste. It's done when it thickens a tad.

 

Pumpkin pie recipe off the Libbys canned pumpkin label.

 

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2 hours ago, aallenba said:

I would be happy to email you all of my recipes that I've collected over the last 5 years for Thanksgiving (and my Christmas recipes if needed). I have some super easy (i.e make ahead and crockpot friendly) and tasty recipes for everything: turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc. 

Product specific, I do like the Udi's classic French dinner rolls.

 

 

Yes I'd love that! How do I send you my email address so the whole world Doesn't have it. Not that it really matters no one knows me lol. 

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Don't forget it's not about the food.  It's about being with your people. 

We've had good luck with Kroger's gluten-free turkey dinner from the deli area, if you don't care to cook.  I didn't care for their sides, but the turkey was good.

We now save turkey for Christmas and have brisket for Thanksgiving. A good BBQ place will offer it gluten-free on their catering menu with gluten-free and gluten condiments available. 

 

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