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knitty kitty

Metal Or Shingle Roof?

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Hey KK! 

I started to write this earlier today, but was distracted.  It looks like you made your decision.  So that is good news.  

What I wrote earlier:

“I am sorry that your roof is leaking.  

My parents have a metal roof and they live in the South.  It is supposed to last over 60 years compared to 15 to 20 years for asphalt.  It is also supposed to be cooler (reflective) than asphalt.  Asphalt can be damaged by high winds and trees.  My parents have lots of trees surrounding their house.  My friend just removed an asphalt roof and invested in a metal roof.  He also is surrounded by trees.  Both are in the South where small tornados, hail and heavy rain hit.

I know little about roofing, but if I could have a metal roof, I would try to keep it.  

I hope you are able to figure it out.  Get quotes, but also get references and check for insurances, business ratings, etc.”


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

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Thanks, CyclingLady!

While waiting for a reply, I googled and found a site that said it was hard to replace just a section of metal roof because the metal sheets overlap.  Pull up one and it disturbs the ones next to it.  So that answered my question. 

I really like the metal roof.  I like listening to the rain.  It will be more pleasant to listen to the rain without worrying about leaks.  

I wish you could do the business end of it for me... quotes, references, insurance, etc.  I've no head for business.  Just thinking about it makes me anxious.  

I will start making inquiries next week.  

Maybe I can get a couple of those whirlygig spinning vents put in to cool the attic....

Opinions if they are really helpful are welcome.  

Thanks again, CL!

 

 

Edited by knitty kitty
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You can check via online:

1) the Better Business Bureau 

2) confirm a company’s business license and their liability insurance (In case  of injury to their crew) to prevent a lean on your house.  

3) ask about their use of subcontractors and their liability.  

4) customer reviews (know that some people complain about everything!) and ones that come back a few years later to report.

This does a good job of explaining the process of hiring a contractor:

https://www.travelers.com/resources/home/renovation/checklist-for-hiring-the-right-contractor

We keep a binder on our house.  Every purchase, upgrade, modification is documented. It is so handy when we need to match paint or recall when we last repaired our dryer.  We live in a historical home, so having that to pass on to future passionate owners (only like-minded people buy old houses it seems) is key.  We have tracked all the permits and owners of our home since it was built.   We have also kept photographs of our projects.  

Attic fans can be great, at least in our area (California) where humidity is not a factor.  We found that while they do not immediately cool at house, they do help keep it from heat building over time.  It is thermostat controlled, plus, we can turn it off with a switch in the hallway.  I would love a whole house attic fan, but those are not good if you have allergies, especially in the South (my extended family resides) with all that tree pollen!  Ours is installed, not on the roof, but in the attic wall, so no possibility of  it ever compromising the roof.  So, please investigate if a fan would be good for your area and your type of house.   You sure do not want to draw cool a/c from your house to cool the attic or bring in too much moisture from the outside.  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Cycling Lady, 

Thank you so much!  These are very helpful guidelines and resources!  

I don't have a binder, but I do have a plastic bag full of instruction manuals, notes, and receipts.  You've inspired me to get them in proper order.  But I have to take a break first!  I've been traumatized by a trip to the grocery store.  Too few people are following mask and distancing guidelines for my tastes. 

Stay safe and well at home!

Knitty Kitty

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We just replaced a shingle roof with a 40 year architectural shingle roof a year ago. They are not a standard shingle roof. They are thicker, heavier, and almost an overlapping 3 shingle look to it. 

I at first considered metal as a friend in a town over did a metal roof ( her husband is a contractor and materials only- labor free) . My friend is closer to retirement and  already has next move/location planned.

My husband talked to roofers and investigated more based on my idea. He came up with the 40 year shingle roof as best for us in midwest. The metal based on labor and not best fit for our location had the 40 year take the lead. For the type of style of home and roof pitch we have the architectural won out. 

My friend's roof is a beauty, but not being married to a builder with free "labor" a luxury for our budget vs our other option. Regardless, I like the new roof and color change. It softened my post WWII Midwest house it looks younger and fresher. She was beautiful and loved before, but deserved some pampering.

 

Best wishes on what you pick.

 

 

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13 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

You can check via online:

1) the Better Business Bureau 

2) confirm a company’s business license and their liability insurance (In case  of injury to their crew) to prevent a lean on your house.  

3) ask about their use of subcontractors and their liability.  

4) customer reviews (know that some people complain about everything!) and ones that come back a few years later to report.

This does a good job of explaining the process of hiring a contractor:

https://www.travelers.com/resources/home/renovation/checklist-for-hiring-the-right-contractor

We keep a binder on our house.  Every purchase, upgrade, modification is documented. It is so handy when we need to match paint or recall when we last repaired our dryer.  We live in a historical home, so having that to pass on to future passionate owners (only like-minded people buy old houses it seems) is key.  We have tracked all the permits and owners of our home since it was built.   We have also kept photographs of our projects.  

Attic fans can be great, at least in our area (California) where humidity is not a factor.  We found that while they do not immediately cool at house, they do help keep it from heat building over time.  It is thermostat controlled, plus, we can turn it off with a switch in the hallway.  I would love a whole house attic fan, but those are not good if you have allergies, especially in the South (my extended family resides) with all that tree pollen!  Ours is installed, not on the roof, but in the attic wall, so no possibility of  it ever compromising the roof.  So, please investigate if a fan would be good for your area and your type of house.   You sure do not want to draw cool a/c from your house to cool the attic or bring in too much moisture from the outside.  

I must shared while your home sounds older. I just share as the second owner of our home. The former owner built it and their kids sold it. Only the great grand daughter of a brick mason walked into an older home with cobwebs and lights out due to comed outage at viewing and said  it needs love . What an awesome masonry home with real brick facade, and a 2 car brick and masonry garage what a hidden gem. 

one friend said "next microburst I'm sheltering in your garage. "

We like what we like and not everyone appreciates a classic, thankfully otherwise it wouldn't be mine ?

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