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Aaron275

Reacting to new foods in diet - has anyone experienced this?

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Hi,

I am having a weird problem that I am hoping to get some advice on.

I usually eat the same thing every day with a few small variations. Lately I have been trying to introduce some new foods into my diet, and I seem to be reacting to these new foods for no apparent reason. I get all of my usual symptoms like bloating, brain fog, depression, etc.

I've had this problem with these foods:

Soy milk
Lactose-free cheese
Dairy-free cheese (happened with two different brands)
Coconut yoghurt
Blueberries

All were gluten-free. As far as I can see, there is no pattern there except that they are all foods that I don't usually eat.

I can live without the first 3 on the list, but I need to be able to eat coconut yoghurt and blueberries to do the AIP diet.

Has anyone experienced this before? If I keep eating those foods, will this problem settle down as my body gets used to them?

Thanks

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Aaron,

Welcome to the forum!

Lots of us Celiacs don't tolerate Soy and soy containing products well.  Look into a nut based milk instead.

Lactose free cheese and dairy free cheese often contain an additive called microbial transglutaminase that helps improve texture and shelf life.  The Food industry says this is a processing agent and it won't be on the ingredients label.  (Who would buy such "foods" if it was?) Unfortunately, microbial transglutaminase is chemically the same as tissue transglutaminase which the body produces during a reaction to gluten.  So, best to skip the cheese wannabes.  

That microbial transglutaminase is probably in your store bought coconut yogurt, too.  

Here's a study on microbial transglutaminase from the National Institute of Health....

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30543926/

You could make your own coconut yogurt at home.  There's recipes out there for homemade AIP coconut yogurt as well as homemade nut milk yogurts. 

Or try something else fermented....

https://www.thepaleomom.com/the-health-benefits-of-fermented-foods/

Or just skip the yogurt. You don't have to eat yogurt on the AIP diet.  Or fermented foods either.  Your microbiome will change as you cut out added sugars.  Supplementing with thiamine, (Vitamin B1), will help beneficial bacteria to grow.

Hope this helps!

 

 

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Wow, thanks for that - I never would have figured that out.

So this microbial transglutaminase is in a lot of foods then? Is there any way to tell which foods have it and which don't?

I guess the best way to avoid it is to stick to unprocessed foods?

Is it used in canned Salmon? That's another thing I was going to use in my AIP diet.

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Aaron, 

Microbial transglutaminase is called "meat glue" by the food industry.  It is found in processed luncheon meats, formed chicken nuggets, and sauages.  It is also found in gluten containing bakery items as well as in similar gluten free bakery items.  And dairy and non-dairy items such as ice cream, yogurt, and cheeses.  Those sauce covered frozen vegetables is another.  You get the idea.

Because microbial transglutaminase is considered a processing agent and doesn't have to be on the ingredients list, it's difficult to ascertain which products do not use it.  The popularity and use of microbial transglutaminase in food products has increased in recent years.  Like the article stated, it could be a contributing factor of the increase in Celiac Disease cases.  Best to stay away from all processed foods, at least for a while.  Focus on fresh veggies and meats and fruits. 

Canned salmon would probably be safe.  Be suspicious of frozen preformed salmon patties.  

Hope this helps!

 

 

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Hello Aron,

I agree with all that knitty kitty says because I was also reacting to many dairy free products and after some research found it was the transglutaminase.  I was just diagnosed with celiac 2 months ago and found out that I have developed intolerance to different foods too. All the foods you mentioned in addition to a really big list as well. 
It has been challenging to find products 
without harming ingredients for my specific diet so I have been sticking with just whole foods and I fell great having made that decision. But I must admit, I have found 2 brands that work fine for me when I want to satisfy certain cravings like non dairy butter and cheese (violife and miyokos) but I always read the label because not all their products match my criteria and use them sparingly. 
In my case my doctor said to not consume any of the foods from the list she gave me (I took a food and allergy sensitivity test) for 3 months and after that to start them again to see if I’m still reacting negatively. I’m only starting my recovery but Im pretty hopeful these restrictions will be for a bit. I hope this is your case too. 

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3 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

Microbial transglutaminase has been banned in Europe since 2010 because of health concerns. 

My choice is to avoid it.  Always.  

 

But other than gluing meat strips together in restaurants and some processed meat products, where in the US have you found it being used and not included in an ingredients label?  
 

I certainly want to avoid this product since it is unclear that it can cause or harm those with celiac disease.  
 

The USDA is just using this on meat products:

“Products formed from pieces of whole muscle meat, or that have been reformed from a single cut, must disclose this fact on their label, as part of the product name, e.g., "Formed Beef Tenderloin" or "Formed Turkey Thigh Roast." The enzyme must also be listed in the product ingredient statement along with any other ingredients used in the product formulation. TG enzyme is not considered a processing aid that would be exempt from labeling. There are no exemptions to the USDA's mandatory labeling requirement for this product.”

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/food-labeling/safety-of-transglutaminase-tg-enzyme

The Celiac Foundation says this, but it is just a recommendation to manufacturers.  😥

https://celiac.org/about-the-foundation/featured-news/2019/01/association-between-a-common-food-additive-and-celiac-disease/

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

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 I've Googled until my eyes hurt, and no, I could not find a list of food manufacturers that use microbial transglutaminase.  

 I have found lots of references to the wide spread use of mTg in the food industry.  I've found references to the kinds of products in which mTg is used.

I've found companies that make and sell the stuff. Transglutaminase is even for sale on Amazon.

I've found tons of scientific studies that say that use of mTg is widespread.  

But, unfortunately, no neat, tidy list.

Microbial transglutaminase is called an enzyme in many of the following articles.  So that is how it is listed on ingredient labels, as "enzymes".

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927691/

https://www.bdfingredients.com/en.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIlKXl1uS67AIVC9vACh3eugPFEAAYASAAEgJPFvD_BwE

This company sells it and has lists of products in which mTg can be incorporated.

 

 

https://bakerpedia.com/ingredients/transglutaminase/

Under specific circumstances, enzymes can be considered processing aids and will not need to be declared on the label. None-the-less, enzymes used in baking must be safe. Transglutaminase preparations from S. mobaraensis for protein crosslinking in cereal products are considered GRAS substances.

 

 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32097607/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7037116/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32097607/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25676324/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6949334/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7137796/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7037116/

https://chemical-free-life.org/2019/01/04/hidden-food-additive-may-trigger-celiac-disease/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1471-0307.12707

https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/00070701111174587/full/html

https://www.foodnavigator.com/Article/2020/09/14/Stabizym-secures-EU-patent-for-safer-and-more-efficient-liquid-transglutaminase

https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.transglutaminase.com/sites/default/files/2016-03/Gorny%20Law%20Labeling%20of%20TG%20in%20final%20product%2014%20May%202014_en.pdf&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwiB4-7A-brsAhUGY6wKHcL3DFgQFjAGegQIChAB&usg=AOvVaw3jwazFKWjb5YQliaP2Kf9r

 

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Thanks @knitty kitty

These are some of the same things that I found.  Nothing specific.  Best to avoid processed foods as much as possible, I suppose.  
 

I did sent an email to the Gluten Free Watchdog about this topic since she has contacts at the FDA.  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

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Just adding in that other intolerances are common BUT I was reading a study last night about how gluten-free diets lead to a reduction in various good bacteria and things like butyrate so a lot of people simultaneously have improved digestion but also alterations and sometimes other sorts of worsening on it. 
High fibre and probiotics were recommended :). 

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I followed Cyclying Ladies, Ravenswood glass, squirming itch , gluten-free in DC advice /posts in the beginning. I developed additional food intolerance s and sensitivities to additves/ingredients in foods. I stayed whole foods, did not eat out, made my own baked goods 5 ingredients of less to manage. To avoid corn and corn starch I looked to Ennis posts to find what he was able to eat.

My medical team had me do an elimination diet of the top 8 and additional foods/ingredients that triggered symptoms. It became trial and error to find what my body liked. whole foods and AIP /Paleo was helpful. In addition to the gluten issues, food intolerances, my autonomic nervous system issues and orthostic intolerance was revealed which requires additional balance of hydration and electrolytes.

I could not drink cow based milk and could not handle the stabilizer and additives in plant based store bought milks.  I began to make my own homemade almond milk which my body accepted.

So in addition to knitty kitty extensive knowledge/advice on transglutaminase, you may have to modify/tailor the AIP of you are reacting. I had to. Once I could handle AIP, I moved on to adding some Paleo now 4 years later I am slowing introducing some new foods. My experience was tailored to my body and a gradual roll out. No specific lifestyle diet in addition to gluten-free was instantly accepted by my body. 

Good luck

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6 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

Thanks @knitty kitty

These are some of the same things that I found.  Nothing specific.  Best to avoid processed foods as much as possible, I suppose.  
 

I did sent an email to the Gluten Free Watchdog about this topic since she has contacts at the FDA.  

Cycling Lady,

Emailing the Gluten Free Watchdog is a great idea!  

I just wanted to point out that the last link I posted is a pdf download to a document dated 2014 that states that transglutaminase is a processing aid and doesn't have to be listed on the ingredients list.  It's on the third page half way down the page. 

I'm not techno savvy enough to copy and paste it here.  Is anyone here able to do that?  Thanks

Hope this helps.

 

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17 minutes ago, knitty kitty said:

Cycling Lady,

Emailing the Gluten Free Watchdog is a great idea!  

I just wanted to point out that the last link I posted is a pdf download to a document dated 2014 that states that transglutaminase is a processing aid and doesn't have to be listed on the ingredients list.  It's on the third page half way down the page. 

I'm not techno savvy enough to copy and paste it here.  Is anyone here able to do that?  Thanks

Hope this helps.

 

I could not do it either.  The document looks like it was originally printed and then scanned into a PDF.  
 

I do not eat things like chicken nuggets, or fake crab, but I would avoid processed formed meats for sure and probably those non-dairy yogurts and cheeses.  
 

To @Aaron275 — Soy can be a huge problem for many celiacs.  Avoid it. The blueberries is odd, but my own kid recently told me that apples and grapes were bothering her.  Gluttony, not gluten or a food intolerance, was the cause.  Moderation is key.  😆


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

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18 minutes ago, cyclinglady said:

I could not do it either.  The document looks like it was originally printed and then scanned into a PDF.  
 

I do not eat things like chicken nuggets, or fake crab, but I would avoid processed formed meats for sure and probably those non-dairy yogurts and cheeses.  
 

To @Aaron275 — Soy can be a huge problem for many celiacs.  Avoid it. The blueberries is odd, but my own kid recently told me that apples and grapes were bothering her.  Gluttony, not gluten or a food intolerance, was the cause.  Moderation is key.  😆

Totally agree with this. 
I don't eat fake processed foods and do better with 'real' dairy than processed alternatives, but do struggle with things like dairy in bulk. Moderation! 
I probably always did but am more attuned to gut now and it isn't always chaos so I notice what hurts more than I used to. 
Other than gluten, it's not going to kill me though, so I'm trying to relax about it and just eat what I enjoy, in moderation. 

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2 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

I could not do it either.  The document looks like it was originally printed and then scanned into a PDF.  
 

I do not eat things like chicken nuggets, or fake crab, but I would avoid processed formed meats for sure and probably those non-dairy yogurts and cheeses.  
 

To @Aaron275 — Soy can be a huge problem for many celiacs.  Avoid it. The blueberries is odd, but my own kid recently told me that apples and grapes were bothering her.  Gluttony, not gluten or a food intolerance, was the cause.  Moderation is key.  😆

I was eating the blueberries at the same time as other foods, so it's possible that they might not have even been a problem, but I thought I would mention them anyway in case it helped people to work out what was happening.

It was mostly the dairy alternative products that I was having problems with. Eating those triggered a huge reaction, and now I know why.

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