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I have just recently been diagnosed with celiac disease.  I am having troubles with my packed lunches.  Do I need to get rid of all my plastic and glass containers?  How do I need to handle the cooking utensils and pots and pans? I was using some mustard that did not include any gluten on the label but it is the only thing that could have not been right besides the container.  I have read lots of inybut am still confused 🤷‍♀️ 

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As long as the containers are thoroughly washed after having been used with gluten containing food items they should be fine. The only hesitation I have is that tupperware can possibly trap gluten in the plastic if it gets hot enough. Same with utensils. Are you sharing a home with others who are not eating gluten free?

Keep in mind that Celiacs often develop allergies/sensitivities to non gluten foods because of the damage to the gut lining ("leaky gut") that allows larger than normal protein fractions to pass into the blood stream. This can signal the immune system to see them as threats.

Processed food labels that do not list gluten as an intentional ingredient may still have enough gluten from cross contamination of the ingredients used or in the processing to give some Celiacs issues.  This is true even of food items labeled "Gluten Free." "Gluten Free" is not the same as "Certified Gluten Free." The latter has actually been tested to make sure that any cross contamination is not significant enough to exceed the 20 ppm or 10 ppm (depending on which certifying group we are talking about). 20 ppm is the FDA established threshold for being certified gluten free but one of the two main certifying groups uses the stricter 10 ppm standard because the experience of the Celiac community is that 20 ppm can still trigger a reaction for some.

Edited by trents
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1 hour ago, trents said:

As long as the containers are thoroughly washed after having been used with gluten containing food items they should be fine. The only hesitation I have is that tupperware can possibly trap gluten in the plastic if it gets hot enough. Same with utensils. Are you sharing a home with others who are not eating gluten free?

Keep in mind that Celiacs often develop allergies/sensitivities to non gluten foods because of the damage to the gut lining ("leaky gut") that allows larger than normal protein fractions to pass into the blood stream. This can signal the immune system to see them as threats.

Processed food labels that do not list gluten as an intentional ingredient may still have enough gluten from cross contamination of the ingredients used or in the processing to give some Celiacs issues.  This is true even of food items labeled "Gluten Free." "Gluten Free" is not the same as "Certified Gluten Free." The latter has actually been tested to make sure that any cross contamination is not significant enough to exceed the 20 ppm or 10 ppm (depending on which certifying group we are talking about). 20 ppm is the FDA established threshold for being certified gluten free but one of the two main certifying groups uses the stricter 10 ppm standard because the experience of the Celiac community is that 20 ppm can still trigger a reaction for some.

Thank you.  I share the kitchen, but he is trying to be as gluten free as he can be.  I have my own toaster and I am replacing items as soon as possible.  I have just struggled this week and can’t figure out what I am doing to myself.  I will be more diligent and write every morsel down so I can figure this out.  I think I will remove dairy and see if that helps. Again, thanks for the insight 

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EH, don't forget that celiac suffers are not immune the various other medical problems that may have nothing to do with gluten. There is a tendency when freshly diagnosed with celiac disease to see all health issues through that lens. This especially needs emphasizing as we face the COVID pandemic.

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