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Rory

Canker Sore problems

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Ever since I was diagnosed with coeliac disease I get so many canker sores. I know this is a symptom of Coeliac Disease, but I am still getting them even on a gluten free diet. I am currently getting them every month and have no reason why it's happening or how to stop them. Can Anyone help me?

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I am gluten free and still occasionally get aphthous ulcers, which I wrote about here:

I think it might be stress, acidic foods, and/or the toothpaste I used to use.


Diagnosed with Celiac in 2010. Diagnosed with sleep apnea 2018.

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20 minutes ago, Scott Adams said:

Are you currently taking any vitamin & mineral supplements? A recent study has linked this with anemia:

 

Not taking any vitamins but had my bloods done last month to do with iron etcetc, all those results came back normal so i'm still struggling. 

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It might be a good idea to find and take a general gluten-free vitamin/mineral supplement. Most celiacs do have various deficiencies until their gut heals, and some even need to take supplements for longer.


Scott Adams

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Founder Celiac.com

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I had canker sores very often as a kid/teen. I remember at times having 3 at once.  I did get them a bit after my gluten challenge. As I stabilized they have subsided. 

All the advice the posters above listed is helpful to you.

Good luck 

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I found some interesting articles about canker sores and vitamin deficiencies.  

"Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and thiamine deficiency"

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1079210496804379

 

"Case Report: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis responds to vitamin B12 treatment"

https://europepmc.org/article/med/15986941

 

"Recurrent aphthous ulceration: vitamin B1, B2 and B6 status and response to replacement therapy"

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1941656/

 

"Vitamin D levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6230238/#!po=46.7742

 

Seems a B-Complex vitamin and Vitamin D would be a good way to go.  

 

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Please try to change your toothpaste. It is a mystery to me why this is not more publicized but SLS in toothpaste worsens the course of canker sores. All my kids and I used to get them and ever since we switched to SLS free toothpaste we’ve had very few episodes. 
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7825393/

good luck. 

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I just ate some marinara sauce and could feel the beginnings of some activity inside my mouth, so for me, it's very likely acidic foods (and the SLS in toothpaste), and not any vitamin deficiency and for sure not anemia. Good luck Rory.


Diagnosed with Celiac in 2010. Diagnosed with sleep apnea 2018.

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Adding the message below today (Nov 8, 2020), after receiving Peter Attia's weekly email. Peter is a physician focusing on the applied science of longevity. His practice deals extensively with nutritional interventions, exercise physiology, sleep physiology, emotional and mental health, and pharmacology to increase lifespan (delay the onset of chronic disease), while simultaneously improving healthspan (quality of life). He also has a fairly interesting podcast. Dr Attia, while technically a "concierge doctor" to an extent (hard to get in to his practice and is beyond expensive, I'm sure), has set a goal of attempting to deliver the most focused, thorough care available to his patients many of whom have metabolic diseases. He is a huge proponent of fasting and time-restricting eating. He often goes into ketosis (note: not ketoacidosis :) ) He also talks a ton about exercise (proper exercise) and, in between times, here-and-there topics like this:

Quote

You may remember a video I posted some months back about the debilitating aphthous (mouth) ulcers I sometimes get, and explained what I use to mediate my discomfort while they heal. Except, one time the pain was so bad that my wife went to look for alternative options. What I normally used wasn’t cutting it. We found that an ingredient in the toothpaste I was using at the time was a contributing factor to my more-than-uncomfortable experience: sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), which is used as a surfactant, or foaming agent. It can also be a mouth and gum irritant. It turns out there are a lot of added ingredients in toothpaste that may not actually clean our teeth and gums, but do provide experiential aspects we are habituated to have—things that we equate to feeling clean. This realization led me to question why toothpaste is often mint-flavored (or flavored at all). Just like the foaming, is the mintiness merely experience-driven, but otherwise pointless from an oral health perspective? I found my answer in an excerpt from Charles Duhigg’s book The Power of Habit. He writes about the ingenious Pepsodent mint-flavored toothpaste recipe. Indeed, the sensation provides no cleaning benefit, but that minty fresh feeling makes us feel clean. Reminds me of the old—we’re talking the 80s and 90s—Denorex commercials (here’s one with NFL TV analyst and former Dallas Cowboys head coach Jimmy Johnson): “All these [other anti-dandruff shampoos] have effective dandruff medicine, but Denorex has something extra that tingles. Feels fresh.” I am going to have someone on the podcast to get into the ins and outs of periodontology. I want to know the practical recommendations for optimal dental hygiene all the way to understanding the relationship between periodontal disease, systemic inflammation, and neurological health.

If interested, you can google him, or check out the topic in further detail.

https://peterattiamd.com/a-few-things-worth-sharing-11-08-2020/


Diagnosed with Celiac in 2010. Diagnosed with sleep apnea 2018.

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