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Jessica1989

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If you refer to diarrhea, it is a very common symptom with Celiac Disease but not universal. Many Celiacs do not have dramatic GI symptoms. I would think stress can exacerbate most health issues. If you are truly eating gluten-free then the big "D" should improve. If not improving, maybe there are other medical issues coming into play or, more likely, you have an intolerance to other, non-gluten foods. Celiac Disease creates general dysfunction in the immune system because of "leaky gut syndrome" and other food intolerances are very common such as to soy and dairy.

Edited by trents

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6 minutes ago, trents said:

If you refer to diarrhea, it is a very common symptom with Celiac Disease but not universal. Many Celiacs do not have dramatic GI symptoms. I would think stress can exacerbate most health issues. If you are truly eating gluten-free then the big "D" should improve. If not improving, maybe there are other medical issues coming into play or, more likely, you have an intolerance to other, non-gluten foods. Celiac Disease creates general dysfunction in the immune system because of "leaky gut syndrome" and other food intolerances are very common such as to soy and dairy.

Yes i am.. I have my ups and downs with gluten and gluten free.. Im coming around like gluten free.. Its just so expensive.. I'm always nauseous with my celiac and I have burning in my stomach I thought it was my female problems that I have to but they ruled that out so I'm thinking it's Celiac I'm not sure what's going on with me my body just hates me

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Have you been tested for and diagnosed with Celiac Disease?

Simply cutting down on gluten consumption or being hit and miss with it really doesn't allow for healing in the gut. When you have Celiac Disease the mucosa of the small bowel is damaged when you consume gluten, even minor and trace amounts. 

Eating gluten-free doesn't have to be expensive if you simply make up your mind to eat only simple foods such as fresh meat, fruits and vegetables. It is the prepared "gluten free" foods that are expensive. Eating prepared foods, even some that claim to be gluten-free, and eating out is a sure way to sabatoge good intentions to eat gluten-free. Of course, this can be socially limiting or at least socially challenging. But if you have celiac disease it is what it is and you have the choice of either ignoring it and trashing your body or heeding it and making necessary adjustments to preserve health.

The value of getting tested for Celiac Disease is two-fold:

1. It either confirms you have it or points you in another medical direction that hopefully will lead to getting a handle on the real issue

2. Psychological in the sense of giving you no excuse to cheat on the gluten-free diet if you do have Celiac Disease

Edited by trents

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Yes i have been test for it and been diagnosed with it.. I love me some veggies and fruit and meats.. here lately fruit been what i go to.. They dont upset my stomach.. I have a hard time with the sweets.. Most of the sweets out there has gluten in it.. But i have found one sweet that doesnt have gluten in it..

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If you are still having problems with diarrhea then I would take a close look at cross contamination sources and other food intolerances. Cross contamination issues are of major importance when people are still eating out. For instance, you will get "glutened" if you eat things that in themselves contain no gluten but have been cooked on the same grills and in the same vats as food items that do contain gluten. For instance, french fries in fast food restaurants that have been cooked together with breaded chicken patties. You must also check meds and supplements because wheat starch is often used as a filler in pills.

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I stay away from fast food as much as i can.. And if i do eat out.. Im getting salads. some places do have a gluten free menu. Im on medicine for my celiac.. I have to take one if im snacking and two for a meal.. And i have zofran when im noxious

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It's called Creon I think it's just a medicine if I remember correctly cuz it's been a minute since I've been on it

It's been a couple years since I've been diagnosed with celiac disease I think if I'm remember correctly with the stomach Dr the reason he gave me that medicine was to help coat my stomach so I could keep my food down cuz I had a problem at the beginning of the celiac disease what I got diagnosed with it but throwing up all the time

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Creon is given for Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI) which can accrue from the damage done to the small bowel lining by Celiac Disease. EPI resulting from Celiac Disease usually goes away when people are truly practicing a gluten free diet. Creon does not directly address Celiac Disease. Currently, there are no medications available that work directly to prevent inflammation of the small bowel caused by gluten ingestion by those who have celiac disease. There are a number of meds in various phases of trial that are designed to do just that but none have been approved yet. The hope is soon something like that will be available that will at least prevent reaction to minor amounts of gluten such as we experience with cross contamination. 

Edited by trents

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What do you mean when you say having our gallbladder removed caused your Celiac Disease? The gallbladder produces bile which aids in the digestion of fats.

Celiac Disease is and autoimmune disease rooted in a genetic predisposition that often is latent until some triggering stress event activates it. The stress event can be anything from a viral infection (or other medical trauma) to a divorce (psychological). People who do not have the predisposing genes will not get Celiac Disease but many who do have the genes will also not develop the disease because it is never triggered. 

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Oh I know after I got my gallbladder removed it went downhill from me and that's when I found out I had celiac disease.. I don't know anymore so I have a question if something says may contain gluten does that mean it has gluten in it

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The discovery of your Celiac Disease after the gallbladder removal may have been coincidence or the surgery itself could have been the triggering event. You might also benefit from a lower fat diet since you don't have a gallbladder any longer.

If a food label says something may contain gluten it could mean one of three things or all of them:

1. There has been no effort to control cross contamination in the production, transport, storage or processing of the item, even though gluten is not an intentional ingredient. A good example of this is Quaker oats which is grown in the same localities (even in the same fields) as wheat, barley and rye, transported in the same trucks and rail cars, and ground on the same equipment as gluten containing grains. This becomes even more complicated when you are dealing with processed foods made from ingredients coming from various suppliers, none of whom is likely testing their product for gluten cross contamination. 

2. The formulation of the processed food item can change over time. What once was something that did not contain wheat, barley or rye may now do so. Companies tend to change formulation when the prices of the individual ingredients go up or down. So, when they say "may contain wheat" they are warning you that it sometimes probably does. 

3. This product has not been tested for gluten content. We make no attempt to monitor possible cross contamination of the ingredients from our suppliers and we do not test the final product for gluten content.

In short, if something says "may contain gluten," assume it does. Realize that one batch of that item may not contain enough gluten to trigger an event but the next one will. 

Also, there is a difference between something labeled "Gluten Free" and "Certified Gluten Free." The latter designation indicates adherence to tighter standards.

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Hi Jessica.  It sounds like perhaps you are still getting gluten in your diet.  I would recommend an updated blood test (TTG) to check your gluten antibody/exposure levels.  

The easiest way to ensure you are not getting any gluten in your diet is to avoid ALL processed, packaged foods--even those labeled "gluten free"--and eat only fresh food that you prepare.  IMHO, food manufacturers and restaurants that tout "gluten free" foods/menus are too risky because you don't really know whether manuf/packaging facilities and cooks (in the case of restaurants or carry outs) are using the same cutting boards, etc. to prepare, for example, salads and sandwiches, other bread items.  When I first got diagnosed and started what I thought was a pretty solid gluten-free diet (including many packaged, gluten-free-labeled items), my blood test numbers were still to high.  I couldn't figure out why so I followed my GIs advice to eat completely "natural" (zero processed, packaged items) and sure enough, the TTG numbers plummeted to near zero!  Also, added pluses of eating 100% natural include:  avoiding the time-consuming, stressful ritual of constant label-reading, worry about whether labels really are indeed accurate, and added calories/additives/fillers in so many gluten-free labeled packaged foods.  Not to mention you would avoid the high cost of expensive packaged, gluten-free-labelled items.

If your current blood tests are negative, then ask your GI or primary care docs to evaluate you for other issues, like bacterial overgrowth in your gut (SIBO), which requires a change in diet and possibly a round of antibiotics and probiotics to balance everything out.  Also, consider whether your indigestion issues are related to chronic stress (certainly understandable given your diagnosis and pandemic anxiety).  I know that, for me, stress is a major gut trigger.  When I get upset, it affects not only my stress level, but also my sleep and digestion and energy levels.

I wish you the best of luck and speedy healing!!

 

 

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strangely enough my bowel movements are normal.... once in the morning....   My new GI doc told me last month that he was surprised I didn't have to go to the bathroom 3 - 5  times a day.....

but my gut still hurts me 4 months into non gluten.....  the doctor said 6 - 12 months for me to feel better

welcome to hell

blame your parents for giving you their garbage genetics

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10 hours ago, Kate333 said:

 

The easiest way to ensure you are not getting any gluten in your diet is to avoid ALL processed, packaged foods--even those labeled "gluten free"--and eat only fresh food that you prepare.

 

 

 

Even vanilla ice cream and greek yogurt????????

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Be glad u dont have to go frequent I go from the time I get up the time I go to bed it sucks and miserable I will see my GI on the 24th of November hopefully he has some insight on what's going on with me fingers crossed

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gluten free menus are usually not gluten free.. if they have crumbs from other gluten foods in your food..    you shouldn't be eating out at all...

only dedicated gluten free places might be ok where everything they make there is gluten free....  but even those places i dont trust

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6 hours ago, DJFL77I said:

gluten free menus are usually not gluten free.. if they have crumbs from other gluten foods in your food..    you shouldn't be eating out at all...

only dedicated gluten free places might be ok where everything they make there is gluten free....  but even those places i dont trust

I didnt think bout that.. cuz I've been to Hacienda the couple times an ordered off the gluten free menu... Im just going to stop eating... If only i could

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I think it needs to be said that some Celiacs are more sensitive to cross contamination issues than others. For some, even the FDA standard for labeling something gluten free of 20ppm is not good enough to prevent reactions. I would not necessarily stop eating at places that have gluten-free menus unless I had good reason to believe they aren't living up to the billing. When in doubt, you should consider quizzing the chef about the precautions they implement against cross contamination. 

If I must eat out at a restaurant that has no gluten-free menu options I can always order a baked potato and some steamed green beans or broccoli and ask that they cook the eggs or meat in a separate clean pain. There are ways to do these things but you have to be a little assertive.

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1 minute ago, trents said:

I think it needs to be said that some Celiacs are more sensitive to cross contamination issues than others. For some, even the FDA standard for labeling something gluten free of 20ppm is not good enough to prevent reactions. I would not necessarily stop eating at places that have gluten-free menus unless I had good reason to believe they aren't living up to the billing. When in doubt, you should consider quizzing the chef about the precautions they implement against cross contamination. 

If I must eat out at a restaurant that has no gluten-free menu options I can always order a baked potato and some steamed green beans or broccoli and ask that they cook the eggs or meat in a separate clean pain. There are ways to do these things but you have to be a little assertive.

Right.. I know when I go to Arby's they wiped out on their counter change their gloves and do my order before they touch any gluten Burger King I get a burger salad in is I get the roast beef with cheese on top of it . Burger King and McDonald's I get a burger salad the most of the time I go to salad

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7 hours ago, Jessica1989 said:

Right.. I know when I go to Arby's they wiped out on their counter change their gloves and do my order before they touch any gluten Burger King I get a burger salad in is I get the roast beef with cheese on top of it . Burger King and McDonald's I get a burger salad the most of the time I go to salad

No offense intended but IMO you are taking a big risk of gluten exposure by eating at those fast-food restaurants.   

I used to work in fast-food, and I can tell you that most of these restaurants use the SAME grills/food prep boards/utensils and sometimes they are cleaned between orders; more often not, and never thoroughly enough.  These places are very fast-paced, high volume, busy places where even well-meaning staff can be rushed, forgetful, or sometimes just plain ignorant about the strict food prep. practices required to produce a truly gluten-free meal. 

For example, if a burger (with toasted bun) or crumbs from salad croutons prepared for other customers' orders "accidentally" end up in YOUR salad or roast beef sandwich....or that hamburger salad meat was cooked on the same grill used earlier to butter and toast buns......  Well, you get the picture...

Most fast-food workers don't understand the nuances of celiac disease, let alone the strict gluten-free dietary guidelines & food prep protocol.   It took me MONTHS to figure it all out after my diagnosis.  Is it reasonable to expect a teenager or other employees working at McDonalds or Subway who have never even heard of celiac disease to be able to understand all that and change their routines for a few customers?  Probably not.  

Is adapting to this big change in eating routine upsetting?  Of course!  But not nearly as upsetting as enduring a sudden acute gluten attack...              

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2 minutes ago, Kate333 said:

No offense intended but IMO you are taking a big risk of gluten exposure by eating at those fast-food restaurants.   

I used to work in fast-food, and I can tell you that most of these restaurants use the SAME grills/food prep boards/utensils and sometimes they are cleaned between orders; more often not, and never thoroughly enough.  These places are very fast-paced, high volume, busy places where even well-meaning staff can be rushed, forgetful, or sometimes just plain ignorant about the strict food prep. practices required to produce a truly gluten-free meal. 

For example, if a burger (with toasted bun) or crumbs from salad croutons prepared for other customers' orders "accidentally" end up in YOUR salad or roast beef sandwich....or that hamburger salad meat was cooked on the same grill used earlier to butter and toast buns......  Well, you get the picture...

Most fast-food workers don't understand the nuances of celiac disease, let alone the strict gluten-free dietary guidelines & food prep protocol.   It took me MONTHS to figure it all out after my diagnosis.  Is it reasonable to expect a teenager or other employees working at McDonalds or Subway who have never even heard of celiac disease to be able to understand all that and change their routines for a few customers?  Probably not.  

Is adapting to this big change in eating routine upsetting?  Of course!  But not nearly as upsetting as enduring a sudden acute gluten attack...              

I dont eat out very offen .. I pick my gluten free stuff over gluten any day.. I love my salads and my fruits. The only veggies i really like to eat are potatoes broccoli cauliflower.. And my fruits bananas apple pears and black olives watermelon and etc.. Im doing alot better with things.. I dont like being sick if i do come across gluten.. Im taking it more serious

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13 hours ago, Jessica1989 said:

Right.. I know when I go to Arby's they wiped out on their counter change their gloves and do my order before they touch any gluten Burger King I get a burger salad in is I get the roast beef with cheese on top of it . Burger King and McDonald's I get a burger salad the most of the time I go to salad

you're crazy if you're eating at those places and think you're not getting Gluten in that food..

that's the reason you're constantly going to the bathroom

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