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Blue_Sky

Study linking IBS to zinc deficiency.

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Here is some information I found about IBS and zinc.

Zinc has some anti-inflammatory properties. I know diabetes and other autoimmune conditions can effect zinc levels.

(The information about zinc vs copper levels in celiac disease is based on a study where many of the people with celiac disease said they weren't following a gluten free diet.)

If zinc is helpful for IBS it is likely also helpful for repairing the gut and reducing inflammation in it. 

The connection between IBS and zinc deficiency seems solid to me. 

https://academic.oup.com/tropej/article/56/6/391/1664661

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190624111608.htm

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-HealthProfessional/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190624111608.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7411643/

Think so?

 

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Thanks for all the info links Blue_Sky.  There's some interesting stuff in there.  The study in India seems to indicate the zinc levels in the patients increased significantly on the gluten-free diet even without supplementation.  Not to the same level as the supplement group, but close to it.  They didn't say what kind of gluten-free foods those people were eating though.


Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."

Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.

Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplant, celery, strawberries, pistachios, and hard work. Have a good day! 🙂 Paul

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It is interesting for sure, and some past summaries we've done have shown that zinc deficiency is even more common than anemia: "67% of celiac patients showed zinc deficiency, 46% showed decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia."

 


Scott Adams

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Founder Celiac.com

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16 hours ago, Blue_Sky said:

Here is some information I found about IBS and zinc.

Zinc has some anti-inflammatory properties. I know diabetes and other autoimmune conditions can effect zinc levels.

(The information about zinc vs copper levels in celiac disease is based on a study where many of the people with celiac disease said they weren't following a gluten free diet.)

If zinc is helpful for IBS it is likely also helpful for repairing the gut and reducing inflammation in it. 

The connection between IBS and zinc deficiency seems solid to me. 

https://academic.oup.com/tropej/article/56/6/391/1664661

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190624111608.htm

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-HealthProfessional/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190624111608.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7411643/

Think so?

 

Blue Sky,

I think you will appreciate these links on Zinc.

Entitled "Effects of Zinc Deficiency on Th1 and Th2 Cytokine Shifts"

https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/182/Supplement_1/S62/2191506

And this one entitled  "Zinc-Altered Immune Function and Cytokine Production"

https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/130/5/1407S/4686394

I wrote about the Zinc deficiency connection in Celiac's in this Posterboy blog post....

Note: this is a Cliff notes version of how "poor nutrition" in Celiac's can lead, in part, to a Celiac diagnosis....

There is only so much you can put into one blog post....but I hi-lighted how a B1 (Thiamine), B2 (Riboflavin), B3 (Niacin), Zinc and Magnesium deficiency could contribute to complications in Celiacs....

There may be others......but I have found these B-Vitamin/Minerals are commonly low in newly diagnosed in Celiac's and one or more of these Vitamin/Minerals might even be a trigger for the Celiac disease itself... at least in part...only more study will/can prove this.....but I think your onto something with the Zinc deficiency angle...

But it will truly hard to tell which came first the "chicken" or the "egg" without more studies.....

And it should be noted: That is what I have continued to advocate for.....more studies to prove these associations are not just that but connections/triggers too!

You might enjoy this Posterboy blog post too! On how there might be two types of Celiac disease one triggered by your Environment IE Vitamin Deficiencies and One triggered by your "Bad" Genes!

To quote an old friend...

"Truth what ever it is! Is better than error whatever it is!"

Good luck on your continued search for truth!

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice.

Posterboy,

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Your welcome. Here is some more information about leaky gut and how some things interact in the intestine that I found useful and helpful.

The experiment in the link below was done on normal cells, exposed to gluten peptides. I know gluten peptides can enter cells, and they can also trigger inflammation by activating receptors on the outside of cells. Celiac disease is a immune reaction triggered by eating gluten...but blocking leaky gut is one way to lower inflammation or sensitivity levels. 

Larozio-acetate is a compound that helps with leaky gut but it is not available yet. 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/am-pdf/10.1002/mnfr.201700879

Zinc also inhibits tissue-transglutamine while calcium activates it. The compounds in green tea, such as theanine, or EGCG block a number of receptors on cells. Zinc also inhibits a (or maybe more than one) peptide transporting receptor. These are two other possible links between celiac disease and zinc and also ibs. 

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1025797808703

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OK, I didn't notice this paragraph before.  This one says that celiacs trend towards having normal zinc levels but low copper levels.  So we screw up the calculations because our opposite copper/zinc ratios cancel out the ratios from IBS people.  So the paragraph is saying zinc is a problem for people with IBS  but not those with celiac.  We are off-balance in the other direction, having low copper vs low zinc.  So zinc levels are a problem for general IBS, but not for celiacs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7411643/

Another potential limitation is that the data used for this study were collected in 1976–1980; however, this was the last NHANES dataset to identify individuals with IBS and the only one to also include serum copper and zinc measurements. In addition, we could not exclude celiac disease, which has an estimated prevalence of 5.7% among individuals with IBS37 compared to 1% in the general population. Those with celiac disease are at increased risk of copper deficiency and have been found to have normal zinc levels,38, 39 so the inability to exclude them from the group with IBS may have biased our estimates of the copper–zinc ratio in the group with IBS toward zero. Another potential limitation is recall bias, which may have affected the results of the 24‐h dietary recall and food frequency survey. However, our finding of an abnormal copper–zinc ratio was based on hematologic and biochemical testing, which would not be affected by this bias.


Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."

Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.

Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplant, celery, strawberries, pistachios, and hard work. Have a good day! 🙂 Paul

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In general I think the idea is that people should get enough zinc magnesium selenium and copper.

If you are talking about treated celiac disease, it does seem like zinc level tend to normalize. However is is more confusing because of the overlap between IBS and Celiac disease. Technically celiac disease is a type of IBS.  Also the two groups overlap.

Inflammation does effect zinc levels, but the relationship I think is complex.  Like occasional exposure to gluten may for some people increase there zinc levels.  Or some people with celiac disease may take supplements. The average then may be high but some still have a zinc deficiency. 

If you are talking about a group of people say people with Celiac disease, zinc deficiency might not be a problem. However some people could still have zinc deficiency for other reasons.  

If someone has celiac disease, and all there symptoms go away on gluten free diet that is great. If they continue to have food sensitivities they may want to check their zinc intake.  

IBS (excluding celiac disease) is a risk factor for zinc malabsorption and there is evidence that it can be a vicious circle.  There is a long list things that might cause zinc malabsorption. 

Copper deficiency might also be a problem, I don't know about that. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5490603/

The data is from a long time ago, but it does make a connection back then between zinc and ibs. The connection between treated celiac disease and zinc levels (high or low) seems really sketchy to me. 

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4 hours ago, Blue_Sky said:

In general I think the idea is that people should get enough zinc magnesium selenium and copper.

Blue Sky,

YOU are onto something here.

I wrote a Posterboy blog post about this connection of Micronutrients being low in Celiac's...

The Mayo Clinic studied this topic...

Here is my Posterboy blog post about it....

https://www.celiac.com/blogs/entry/2714-mayo-clinic-study-shows-micronutrient-deficiencies-are-still-common-in-contemporary-celiac-disease-despite-lack-of-overt-malabsorption-symptoms/ 

Here is the original research from the Mayo Clinic.

Entitled "Micronutrient Deficiencies Are Common in Contemporary Celiac Disease Despite Lack of Overt Malabsorption Symptoms".

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31248695/

And you will notice in Celiac's nearly 60 percent are low in Zinc.

You will have white spots aka "Stars"  in your nail bed if you are low in Zinc....

I was low in Zinc when I was diagnosed....you might also have trouble with Anxiety, ADHD and OCD....

Zinc is linked to intelligence...

Taking a Sublingual Zinc Lozenge is a great way to get Zinc in your system....it will become metallic tasting when your body has absorbed enough Zinc.

Pumpkin seeds are a good source of Zinc as well...

Here is how Zinc and Magnesium interact...

https://www.livestrong.com/article/505493-will-taking-too-much-magnesium-cause-a-zinc-deficiency/

I also want to note this GREAT article on how Nutrients interact in the body.....it can be difficult to  understand with so many Antagonistic and Synergistic (Protagonist) relationship but it is worth studying to figure it out....

https://www.deannaminich.com/vitamin-and-mineral-interactions-the-complex-relationship-of-essential-nutrients/

It is the best I have read on the topic...

Note: Vitamin B3 (Nicotonic Acid) relationship to Zinc Levels....

From the Deanna Minich article

"Supplementing with nicotinic acid (Vitamin B3) might provide a dose-dependent improvement in hepatic zinc levels and better antioxidant markers, including less lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels."

Could low Zinc levels be a predictor of Low Niacin levels....if this online article is correct.....Low Zinc could be a sign of Low Stomach Acid...

Since Niacinamide (the flush free form of Niacin) helps build stomach acid and treat digestive problems...

http://www.yourhealthbase.com/database/niacin-treats-digestive-problems.htm

Magnesium will get low 6 months after Stomach acid is suppressed by PPI Acid reducers.

It is possible Zinc might even get low before then....it is hard to say for certain....

But we know their is Zinc/Magnesium connection....

Magnesium has also been shown to have an Immune System Connection...

See this article that studies this Magnesium Connection to our Immune System.

https://www.prohealth.com/library/the-epstein-barr-virus-magnesium-and-me-cfs-connection-36890

quoting from the article...

"Low levels of free magnesium turned off NK and T-cells – and allowed EBV to take up residence in the cell."

So maybe your Zinc hypothesis is true because it gets low together with Magnesium....

This explains why being low in Magnesium can trigger virus's to enter our cells.

It also explains how EBV has been/is (can be) associated with Celiac disease.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-04-epstein-barr-virus-linked-diseases.html 

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice.

Posterboy,

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17 hours ago, Blue_Sky said:

In general I think the idea is that people should get enough zinc magnesium selenium and copper.

...

In general I agree! :)

I am not any kind of chemistry expert or biological expert on these things myself.  I do think it's good to consider them though.

Another impact on intestinal permeabillity is the chemicals we ingest in our food.  The article I linked here talks about potato alkaloids increasing gut permeability.  So that's another thing to consider.  It might be helpful to cut potatoes out of the gluten-free diet for most of us.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12479649/

...

Results: Glycoalkaloids embedded and permeabilized the T84 monolayer epithelial membrane bilayer in a concentration-dependent fashion, with C:S > C > S. In vitro Ussing chamber experiments also illustrated a concentration-dependent disruption of intestinal barrier integrity in animals with a genetic predisposition to develop IBD, but not in control animals. Similarly, in vivo oral feeding experiments demonstrated that C:S ingestion, at physiologic concentrations, aggravated histologic colonic injury in mice genetically predisposed to developing IBD.

Conclusion: Concentrations of glycoalkaloids normally available while eating potatoes can adversely affect the mammalian intestine and can aggravate IBD.

 


Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."

Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.

Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplant, celery, strawberries, pistachios, and hard work. Have a good day! 🙂 Paul

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I want to contribute.....

"Role of vitamin-zinc interactions on in vitro zinc uptake by human erythrocytes"

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15235145/

Under the zinc-deficient state, thiamine significantly enhanced the zinc uptakes.

And then this....

"Aggravated effects of coexisting marginal thiamine deficits and zinc excess on SN56 neuronal cells"

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1028415X.2019.1641296?journalCode=ynns20

"Conclusion: Our data indicate that Thiamin Deficiency may amplify otherwise non-harmful border-line Zn excitotoxic signals yielding progress of neurodegeneration."

Wow!  What a delicate balance we are made with.

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Blue Sky Et Al,

Here is a nice article about Zinc and the GI tract entitled "Zinc Deficiency, Malnutrition and the Gastrointestinal Tract"

This is a nice thread.....I hope it helps many people...

https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/130/5/1388S/4686387#:~:text=It appears that a vicious cycle operates between,the small intestine%2C preventing or reducing net absorption.

Scan the abstract for now....then when you get a chance you can go back and read it.....all

I know that is all the time I have had for now....I will go back and read IT all if I ever get caught up some time...

But I wanted to share it in the hopes it might help someone else....

Zinc deficiency is a common deficiency in Celiac disease that doesn't get enough press for Sure! among MANY other nutrient deficiencies....like B-Vitamins and Vitamin D!

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31248695/

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice.

Posterboy,

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