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Don’t feel hungry

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I agree, and you should ask your doctor to screen you for it via a blood test:

 If you don't have insurance, or your doctor won't cooperate, besides getting a new doctor, look into home celiac tests which can be done for around $100.

Scott Adams

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Founder Celiac.com

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On 1/27/2021 at 5:19 PM, trents said:

Absolutely! You have a number of symptoms that are classic for celiac disease.

Thanks for swift reply. Most symptoms do flag it but I was unsure of the lack of hunger because most things I’ve read say the hunger problem is the opposite and you always feel hungry 

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Just now, Amoretti said:

Thanks for swift reply. Most symptoms do flag it but I was unsure of the lack of hunger because most things I’ve read say the hunger problem is the opposite and you always feel hungry 

I have a query if anyone can help? If deficiencies in iron, folate and b12 are common symptoms then why are they also a common side effect once gluten has been removed from the diet? 

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Probably due to damage to the villi. Even after going gluten free it can take months - even more than a year - for the villi to experience substantial rebound. And recent studies have shown that the healing may, in some ways, be superficial. There are some cellular structures that when the microscopic magnification is turned up high enough, are not repaired. Have you heard of pernicious anemia? It is caused by the lack of a substance called "intrinsic factor" that is necessary for the absorption of B12 which, in turn, is necessary for the uptake of iron. I wonder if the cellular structures that produce intrinsic factor are something that may experience permanent damage from celiac disease that goes untreated for years. I'm just guessing here.

The other factor is that several recent studies show that most people who claim to be eating gluten free are actually practicing lower gluten eating, not gluten free eating. This is especially true of those who still dine out. Most people trying to eat gluten free are not as scrupulous about cross contamination as they need to be.

Poor appetite is not uncommon for those with celiac disease, though the opposite is more common perhaps. Poor appetite can be reflective of poor general health.

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I agree with Trents that malabsorption due to villi damaged by Celiac Disease is one reason deficiencies of folate, B12, and iron persist after a gluten free diet.  

Another possible reason could be that Celiacs don't choose foods high in folate, B12, and iron, foods like liver and green leafy vegetables. 

Wheat flour is legally required to be enriched with vitamins and minerals lost in processing.  Gluten free versions of crackers and breads and such are not required to be enriched with vitamins and minerals lost in processing.  So newbie Celiacs that depend heavily on gluten free versions of their favorite foods may not be choosing nutrient dense foods like liver and green leafy vegetables.  

I found a riveting study that found several other factors that can influence the absorption of B12 and folate .....

"Absorption and blood/cellular transport of folate and cobalamin: pharmacokinetic and physiological considerations"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4867132/#!po=45.0000

Hope this helps!

P.S. Loss of appetite, muscle weakness, and cold tingly hands and feet are typical symptoms of thiamine deficiency.

There's eight essential B vitamins.  They all work together.  B12 and folate need riboflavin and pyridoxine to work properly.  Riboflavin needs niacin and thiamine which needs magnesium.  Best to take a B-Complex with all the B's than just supplement one or two.  Doctors are clueless about the connection between vitamins and health, imho.  

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Before being diagnosed I lost my hunger for a while I was forcing food into me. Then my hunger slowly returned and has been normal since.

I never experienced any vitamin or mineral deficiencies even though when I was diagnosed I had severe blunting of villi

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11 hours ago, JamesDelaney said:

Before being diagnosed I lost my hunger for a while I was forcing food into me. Then my hunger slowly returned and has been normal since.

I never experienced any vitamin or mineral deficiencies even though when I was diagnosed I had severe blunting of villi

I wrote this post about vitamin deficiency testing which is not always an accurate measurement of vitamin status.

It's been my experience that doctors may routinely test B12 and Vitamin D, but not thiamine or the other B vitamins.  

Could you share your vitamin test results?

http://www.hormonesmatter.com/vitamin-therapy-paradox/

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As knitty kitty pointed out vitamin deficiency testing is itself troubled by deficiencies. It can be more helpful to diagnose vitamin/mineral deficiency by symptoms.

Edited by trents
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This is a good read about vitamin and mineral deficiency testing: https://www.vousvitamin.com/do-i-need-to-have-blood-tests-to-find-out-what-vitamins-to-take/

The author is an endocrinologist in the Chicago area.

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On 1/29/2021 at 8:46 PM, Amoretti said:

I have a query if anyone can help? If deficiencies in iron, folate and b12 are common symptoms then why are they also a common side effect once gluten has been removed from the diet? 

I'm not sure i dont belive that i had any problems with iron after I went gluten free but everyone is different. 

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