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jacobsmom44

Is There Such A Thing As Mild celiac disease

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I was diagnosed with celiac disease last month. I am doing ok, but not completely gluten-free yet. It all started when I joined Weight Watchers and started eating whole wheat and whole grains. I started getting stomach-aches. After being diagnosed, I gave up the wheat products and started feeling better. I have always had gastro problems but my doctor said it was Irritable Bowel. I don't feel like I get sick when I cheat. From what I read on some of these posts, people get horribly sick from "just touching bread". I can't say that has ever happened to me. The GI Doctor did a scope and he says he is 90% sure it is celiac disease, but why doesn't some of the foods bother me? Is it still going to hurt me in the long run if I continue cheating (even if it doesn't bother me)?

I need help?

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There is no such thing as mild celiac. You either have it or you don't. Even if you don't feel symptoms, you are causing damage to your intestines every time you consume gluten, even if it's a small amount. Typically, the longer you are off it, the more you feel it when you accidentally consume some. So, even though you don't feel it now, once you haven't eaten it in a while, you probably will start noticing, especially as your gastro problems start clearing up. Think of it like smoking, a smoker might have bad general health, so stops smoking. At first he notices no difference, but after a few months off it, even a single cigarette might make them ill. It's the same way with gluten.

Welcome!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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If you have been diagnosed with Celiac (and it sound like you have), then you need to be 100% gluten free for life. Wheat, rye, barley and oats (unless you buy the exp uncontaminated kind) free. There are people who don't have obvious symptoms (and some are on this board) but are still doing damage. I am one that didn't have any obvious symtpoms before going gluten free. Now I get some stomach and intestinal distress until it clears my system, usually a day.

Also be sure to check you personal care products, including make up. You'll need your own toaster (if you toast gluten-free bread), your own non stick pan (if you use them, Stainless steel is ok), new colander. Basically, plastics and non stick pans cause the problems in the kitchen.

There is a learning curve to this diet. The most important is the food, then work your way through the list. Some of the quickness of getting through it depends upon the funds available to replace stuff. This forum is a great place to learn from a lot of people's experiences.

Welcome. :D


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Each person will have different outward symptoms, some mild, some horrible and immediate. BUT all celiacs suffer the same internal damage - flattening of the villi, inflammation,and impaired absorbtion.

I have 2 children - one may experience some joint pain or mild stomach ache if he gets a big "gluten oopsie" (oopsie poopsie :o )

the other child gets severe migraines, neck, back pain and stomachache with nausea - within hours of even a teensie bit of gluten.

and guess what - the child with the most damage to the small intestine - was the one with the least outward symptoms (totally flat on all biopsies and visually the GI doc diagnosed celiac before the pathology was back).

This child was only checked cause he was diabetic and sibling was diagnosed celiac.

Do not rely on outward symptoms.


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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Each person will have different outward symptoms, some mild, some horrible and immediate. BUT all celiacs suffer the same internal damage - flattening of the villi, inflammation,and impaired absorbtion.

Some people with severe intestinal damage may have no symptoms whatever, while some people actually don't get any intestinal damage. They may just wake up one day and find that they have neurological problems which prevent them from leading a normal life, and they may never recover.


Nothing

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I hope you decide to go completely gluten-free. There is not just a little gluten-free. You might find yourself with some auto-immune diseases that you do not want, somewhere later in life. My understanding is that a small amount of gluten will require 3 to 4 weeks of recovery time in your small intestine. The diet is really not that hard, once you get over the learning curve. I do most of my shopping in a regular grocery store. I go to the health food store a couple of times a month for things I cannot get in the grocery store. I also eat out several times a month. I am just very careful where I eat. This is really all very doable and well worth the extra effort. Good luck.


"Throw yourself a pity-party and you'll be the only guest." - Earlene Fowler

Diag. Celiac Disease by positive blood test 2/03/2004

Allergies - corn, soy, casein, egg whites and wheat

Morphia Scleroderma

Osteoarthritis

Hypothyroid and Hperthyroid

Essential Tremors

Asthma

Migraines

Fibromyalgia - diag. in 1978 when they called it Fibrositis

PAD Peripheral Artery Disease

Angina and Atrial Fibrillation

Gluten Ataxia

Vitiligo

Scoliosis of the spine (caused by malabsorption and it is horribly painful) This would be enough reason for someone to go gluten free.

Ocular Myastenia Gravis

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I think I fall into a similar category as you. I had no real symptoms before being diagnosed and for a couple of months afterward, I went sort of gluten free. I decided one day to test the daignoses and stayed completely gluten-free for 3 weeks and was extrememly careful. At the end of the 3 weeks, I had some powdered donuts (I really miss those... :rolleyes: ) and within 30 minutes, I was so exhausted that I could hardly move. Now, if I get glutened, I might have some gastric symptoms, but I'll know for sure when I get the sudden energy drain... Following the diet usually isn't really that bad. I'm still in the learning stages, but for the most part, I don't have any major problems. There are a lot of really good substitute foods and if you skip the substitutes, you're left eating a healthy well-balanced meal. Good Luck!

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