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Crystalkd

New To Diet...need Help

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Being so new to the diet and not being able to afford to continue eating the processed stuff I need help figuring out what "the basics" are. I like to cook but I'm not sure what the basics are of what I need to have to make alot of things myself. So far all I know I have is gluten problem. What do I need and what Brands to make things taste as "normal" as possible? I have to admit I'm a little lost.

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I am fairly new to this as well, this site has been wonderful. NOGLUGIRL has a basic list I think, best advise I have is to read labels. As far as the pricey health food store stuff I try to stay away from most of this. I find I do not like the taste, i tend to find receipes and make my own and I have stepped outside of what I am used to eating. Overall I would say it has been a good process for me,

Go to your local library and check out some gluten-free cookbooks, find online receipes that are gluten-free.

I use corn tortillas for all kinds of wraps and even to wrap my burgers in. If you have an Asian Market near you the white rice, and other specialty flours are much cheaper there. Hang in there it gets better.

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We have a big international framers market here. I've been told things are cheap there. I need some pointers on the types and brands of gluten-free baking products and things that don't taste like cardboard. What cheeses can I eat? What are some things that have gluten in them that I might not sspect. I'm getting better at reading labels but it's still confusing and a bit difficult. Trying to carry around 5 pages of what does, doesn't, or may contain gluten makes it even more frustrating! I don't want to have to eat salads all the time or the same old boring dinners. I eat alot of Italian good and like my Cajun food as well. I'm trying to figure out how to eat the things I grew up on and not make myself sick. I'm also not opposed to trying new things. What spices should I stay away from? (brands) I think the Season Salt I have contains some form of gluten. There's so much to keep up with. At this early stage it's mind boggling. I have no doubt I'll get used to it. I know it'll take time.

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McCormick spices will clearly list gluten so you can season your meats and veggies so they don't always taste the same. There's a huge list of companies that will divulge any gluten, but I cant remember who usually posts the list, I don't have it. :(

For recipe ideas, it might be nice to invest in a few gluten free cookbooks. I recommend anything by Bette Hagman and Incredible Edible Gluten Free Food for Kids (not just for kids) by Shari L. Sanderson. Also, you can check out allrecipes.com for recipe ideas. Many recipes are naturally gluten free. You can use the list of companies that will list gluten to find the ingredients. I wish I could help you more on that one.

Welcome to the forum!


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Trying to carry around 5 pages of what does, doesn't, or may contain gluten makes it even more frustrating!

Boy that brings back memories. I was using a SIXTY page PDF and bought a Palm handheld just to always have the list w/ me.

For pasta, it's Tinkyada all the way. EXCEPT - if there's a Trader Joe's near u, it's a buck less and their house brand is, I believe even from the same factory in Canada. (They like to re-brand as a distributor)

As far as cooking, due to celiac-related complications, I suddenly had to only eat what *I* made but had few cooking skills. Watching the food channel or America's Test Kitchen on PBS will be a great help w/ the processes.

Like, how was *I* supposed to know to season a little every step. I woulda done it all at the beginning or end and it doesn't end up as flavorful.

I've seen some recent talk of asian flours (actually FROM asia) being more susceptible to cross-contamination, so u might want to keep that in mind at the international market.


>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03

Dairy-free since 10-04

Soy-free since 5-07

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Being so new to the diet and not being able to afford to continue eating the processed stuff I need help figuring out what "the basics" are. I like to cook but I'm not sure what the basics are of what I need to have to make alot of things myself. So far all I know I have is gluten problem. What do I need and what Brands to make things taste as "normal" as possible? I have to admit I'm a little lost.

Hi Crystal, I've been on the gluten-free diet for about a year and a half now. The best thing to do is to get yourself in to see a nutrionist that specializes in gluten-free diets. Think of all that you can eat, as opposed to what you can't. For starters, any raw vegetabe or fruit is fine. As far as chicken, beef or fish is concerned, anything broiled with olive oil, oregano, garlic, lemon or gluten-free barbcue sauce is fine too. No lunch meats, except the ones that say 'gluten free'. Try to learn to like rice cakes or the tons of crackers that are gluten free instead of bread. I haven't tried a bread that I like yet, but just as well. As soon as you start healing, you'll probably put on some weight because you'll be absorbing nutrients, which you have probably not been absorbing til now. Rice, potatoes and rice pasta are fine too. Be careful with sushi. First of all, California rolls- NO- they have imitation crab meat- all preservatives. But if you like raw tuna sushi, vegetable sushi, or whatever is raw then fine with wheat free soy sauce only- very important. I actually take the wheat free soy sauce with me whenever we go for sushi.

Also it's good to have raw almonds around, fresh peanut butter, and some gluten free snack bars.

You'll do great. Stick to organic stuff whenever possible, no preservatives, prepared foods, or whatever you don't know about. You'll have to learn to be your own advocate- ask questions in restaurants- be careful with salad dressings- tons of them contain wheat- find a gluten-free you like and take with or ask for oil, vinegar and lemon.

It's totally doable. Yah, the food may be more expensive, but there is a solution to this intolerance. My motto is, pay now or pay later. Work on this everyday until is becomes natural. You can do it. Hope this helps!

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