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newlyfree

General Labelling Question...

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I'm finding conflicting info out there and was hoping you knowledgeable types could help me out :)

Is it true that with the new USA labelling laws, ALL ingredients have to be listed on the label? And was it previously true that anything that comprised less than 2% of the final product could be left off? I keep running into sites that say the 'less that 2% rule' still applies, but I didn't think that was the case, otherwise reading labels would tell us nothing at all, right?

Thanks!

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I'm finding conflicting info out there and was hoping you knowledgeable types could help me out :)

Is it true that with the new USA labelling laws, ALL ingredients have to be listed on the label? And was it previously true that anything that comprised less than 2% of the final product could be left off? I keep running into sites that say the 'less that 2% rule' still applies, but I didn't think that was the case, otherwise reading labels would tell us nothing at all, right?

Thanks!

I believe the 2% still applies except when it comes to the 8 most common allergens. Companies do not have to disclose all the ingredients in a flavoring agent, coloring or spice mix, unfortunately this is where most celiacs run into problems for the most part due to malt. Barley and gluten are not in the allergin list and they do not need to be disclosed by law if used in that context. I recently looked up 'stuff' that can be added to meat in the processing that does not have to be disclosed, that list was pages long and barley malt was one of the things listed along with loads with chemicals and antibiotics. If you have doubt about a product do not consume it until you have called the company and verified that it is safe.

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Not to change the topic, but I was wondering if I could throw a quick question in this thread.

"If I see 'Whey' as an ingredient, does that mean I shouldn't eat the food?"

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Not to change the topic, but I was wondering if I could throw a quick question in this thread.

"If I see 'Whey' as an ingredient, does that mean I shouldn't eat the food?"

Whey is derived from milk so as long as you tolerate dairy you should be okay with it. It is not a gluten risk.

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Yeah, I'd heard that about meat, too, and it seriously ticks me off!! :angry:

Thanks for the info, Raven

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I believe the 2% still applies except when it comes to the 8 most common allergens. Companies do not have to disclose all the ingredients in a flavoring agent, coloring or spice mix, unfortunately this is where most celiacs run into problems for the most part due to malt. Barley and gluten are not in the allergin list and they do not need to be disclosed by law if used in that context. I recently looked up 'stuff' that can be added to meat in the processing that does not have to be disclosed, that list was pages long and barley malt was one of the things listed along with loads with chemicals and antibiotics. If you have doubt about a product do not consume it until you have called the company and verified that it is safe.

Actually not true - the protein of a major allergen (casein/gluten) must be disclosed as milk/wheat. It is in the text of the new law if you read it :)

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"that list was pages long and barley malt was one of the things listed along with loads with chemicals and antibiotics."

USDA says otherwise. They've told me more than once that barley MUST be listed if it is added to raw meat.

richard

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Actually not true - the protein of a major allergen (casein/gluten) must be disclosed as milk/wheat. It is in the text of the new law if you read it :)

Perhaps you could supply us with a link, that must be very new revision.

This post that I have linked to addresses that law and that issue. It also has a link for a way to make your voice heard so that barley and rye are also included. As of now they are not.

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=32680

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Guest j_mommy

Am I correct in saying that the US does not consider Gluten as 1 of the 8 major allergens....just wheat right?????

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Am I correct in saying that the US does not consider Gluten as 1 of the 8 major allergens....just wheat right?????

That's how I understand it, yes. And that's why they're working on defining 'gluten-free' as a new label for next year, aside from the top 8.

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Guest j_mommy

Which would be great!!! Many other countries already have it as one of the top allergens!!!!

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Perhaps you could supply us with a link, that must be very new revision.

This post that I have linked to addresses that law and that issue. It also has a link for a way to make your voice heard so that barley and rye are also included. As of now they are not.

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=32680

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/ge...d=f:publ282.108

OR

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/alrgact.html

Then look at this section (NOTE: it unfortunately ONLY enforces WHEAT protein (aka Gluten) and not that or Barley or Rye which we also have a reaction to!

************************ HERE IS THE APPLICABLE SECTION - AT THE END OF COURSE *******

(b ) Effect <<NOTE: 21 USC 343 note.>> on Other Authority.--The

amendments made by this section that require a label or labeling for

major food allergens do not alter the authority of the Secretary of

Health and Human Services under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act

(21 U.S.C. 301 et seq.) to require a label or labeling for other food

allergens.

© Conforming Amendments.--

(1) Section 201 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act

(21 U.S.C. 321) (as amended by section 102(b )) is amended by

adding at the end the following:

``(qq) The term `major food allergen' means any of the following:

``(1) Milk, egg, fish (e.g., bass, flounder, or cod),

Crustacean shellfish (e.g., crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts

(e.g., almonds, pecans, or walnuts), wheat, peanuts, and

soybeans.

**** <- LOOK HERE :) ****

``(2) A food ingredient that contains protein derived from a

food specified in paragraph (1), except the following:

**** ****

``(A) Any highly refined oil derived from a food

specified in paragraph (1) and any ingredient derived

from such highly refined oil.

``(B ) A food ingredient that is exempt under

paragraph (6) or (7) of section 403(w).''.

(2) Section 403A(a)(2) of the Federal Food, Drug, and

Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 343-1(a)(2)) is amended by striking ``or

403(i)(2)'' and inserting ``403(i)(2), 403(w), or 403(x)''.

(d) Effective Date.--The <<NOTE: Applicability. 21 USC 321

note.>> amendments made by this section shall apply to any food that is

labeled on or after January 1, 2006.

***************************************************

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**** <- LOOK HERE :) ****

``(2) A food ingredient that contains protein derived from a

food specified in paragraph (1), except the following:

**** ****

Please note: This indicates that gluten is NOT considered one of the 8 major allergens but that WHEAT = GLUTEN.. i.e. Gluten will be labeled AS WHEAT. (just for clarification)

But if a product has Wheat Gluten in it.. they MUST list Allergens: WHEAT on the label :)

(What is the difference between wheat and gluten anyhow.. can you REALLY separate the chaff from the protein?) :)

As you notice it IS an amendment.. but it is BACK ENFORCEABLE (as indicated in what I clipped) back to January 1st, 2006!!

HERE are the proteins in WHEAT:

The major proteins in wheat-albumin, globulin, gliadin and glutenin (gluten)

If any food were to contain ANY of those above proteins, then it MUST contain on the label:

"Allergens: WHEAT"

If Barley and/or Rye contain Glutenin (which I think they do).. then those proteins would be labeled:

"Allergens: WHEAT"

Please correct me if I missed something in this amendment.. but I think it's pretty clear and definitely on our side for Celiac and allergy sufferers.

(This also applies thhankfully to casein :) )

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Please note: This indicates that gluten is NOT considered one of the 8 major allergens but that WHEAT = GLUTEN.. i.e. Gluten will be labeled AS WHEAT. (just for clarification)

But if a product has Wheat Gluten in it.. they MUST list Allergens: WHEAT on the label :)

(What is the difference between wheat and gluten anyhow.. can you REALLY separate the chaff from the protein?) :)

As you notice it IS an amendment.. but it is BACK ENFORCEABLE (as indicated in what I clipped) back to January 1st, 2006!!

HERE are the proteins in WHEAT:

The major proteins in wheat-albumin, globulin, gliadin and glutenin (gluten)

If any food were to contain ANY of those above proteins, then it MUST contain on the label:

"Allergens: WHEAT"

If Barley and/or Rye contain Glutenin (which I think they do).. then those proteins would be labeled:

"Allergens: WHEAT"

Please correct me if I missed something in this amendment.. but I think it's pretty clear and definitely on our side for Celiac and allergy sufferers.

(This also applies thhankfully to casein :) )

You don't know how much I wish you were right on this. Unfortunately Barley and Rye are not included. For one thing they are addressing true allergins which gluten is not, it is considered an intolerance which is a whole different reaction. With an allergin you can drop dead at a restaurant, with an intolerance you'll die at home a few days later, or just wish you did. We see the wheat free label all the time but it does not mean a product is safe, some companies, I think Newmans Own is one but not sure, have now started to label their wheat free products as specifically not free of gluten, I guess they got to many phone calls from the john from folks who assume that wheat free must also mean gluten free.

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You don't know how much I wish you were right on this. Unfortunately Barley and Rye are not included. For one thing they are addressing true allergins which gluten is not, it is considered an intolerance which is a whole different reaction. With an allergin you can drop dead at a restaurant, with an intolerance you'll die at home a few days later, or just wish you did. We see the wheat free label all the time but it does not mean a product is safe, some companies, I think Newmans Own is one but not sure, have now started to label their wheat free products as specifically not free of gluten, I guess they got to many phone calls from the john from folks who assume that wheat free must also mean gluten free.

It can still say WHEAT FREE.. what I am saying is they have to do one of the following:

"Label the package: Allergens: WHEAT" OR "Ingredients: contains barley"

Both would be legal..

I'm talking to Frito Lay right now try to force them to add the appropriate allergen labels because I bought a package of Tostitos that said:

Ingredients: Corn, Oil, Salt.

I'm not mad at Frito Lay because when I talked to them they obviously did not understand the 'gravity' of the situation.. plus I did get reimbursement (discounts on Lay's STACKS - which are gluten-free) from them. However I think it's VERY important we get the correct labels on our foods so I'm using this as an opportunity to force the issue - is that so wrong?

(I don't see Wheat, Barley, Rye, or any other source of that could cause a GLUTEN reaction right??)

And I had a big ALLERGIC REACTION to gluten from their product - myself and my sons broke out in rashes across different areas of our bodies within 24 hours of ingestion - it incidentally was made on the same lines OR same facility as their FLOUR TORITILLAS..!!! According to the law their product should have been labeled correct - either in the ingredients OR as an allergen statement. I want to 'force' the label issue because I have four boys (and probably a fifth) that are allergic to gluten....

Ok here is a question - my doctor diagnosed me and my children with a "GLUTEN ALLERGY" and NOT celiac. I have been tested for Wheat allergy (via IgE testing) and so has two of my sons and came up completely negative for it... one of which was seen by the head of the gastroenterology department at UVA which is also a celiac expert - which did tons of testing and biopsies and said he had no GSE but still had failure to thrive.. etc.. we took him OFF gluten and he gained 3 lbs almost immediately. The doctor immediately gave us a diagnoses of "Gluten Allergy". He claimed it is VERY RARE but we do NOT have celiac disease - as a matter of fact we have no intestinal damage from it. (although my dad is now having KIDNEY FAILURE from it.. gee I'm not sure which is worse?). So then.. if I have an ACTUAL allergy to gluten then what is that called - and also if someone like ME exists that CAN have an allergic reaction to the proteins.. that is a BIG PROBLEM for them - could I drop dead at a resturaunt.. which incidentally I don't go to anymore because of the cross-contamination problems.

Actually Frito Lay was not very happy to hear we had that kind of reaction (they were very supportive of it though which I am happy to say!) and I'm starting to realize what the consequences are.... my son was put in the ER from asthma - which incidentally his asthma is caused by GLUTEN and we have a diagnosis of that from our allergist - he couldn't deny the fact that he only had his reactions when he ate gluten.. ie GLUTEN ALLERGY. My son had a medical label in his record of "Asthma caused by food allergy to Gluten." I actually don't know if we COULD have an anaphalactic type reaction or if my son stopped breathing because we haven't YET and I hope we never do.. but we do get inflamation caused by the IgA system (asthma, gastritis, GERD).. I take allegra for my IgE allergies and it does NOTHING for my IgA mediated Gluten allergy proving that we CANT TAKE ANTIHISTAMINES to prevent it either!! *SCAREY THOUGHT*

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Please note: This indicates that gluten is NOT considered one of the 8 major allergens but that WHEAT = GLUTEN.. i.e. Gluten will be labeled AS WHEAT. (just for clarification)

This is simply not true. Only wheat protein requires disclosure. Other forms of gluten to which we react, such as rye and barley, are NOT covered by the labelling rule. They are not "derived from wheat" as you seem to imply--they are distinct ingredients.

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This is simply not true. Only wheat protein requires disclosure. Other forms of gluten to which we react, such as rye and barley, are NOT covered by the labelling rule. They are not "derived from wheat" as you seem to imply--they are distinct ingredients.

So Glutenin (which is the protein in wheat) or Gliadin (which is the protein in wheat) must be labeled correct? I thought Gluten = Glutenin = Protein in Wheat. Please correct me if I am wrong.

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Glutenin is a protein specific to wheat. It is not the same as gliadin, another protein in wheat. The general class of proteins to which glutenin belongs are called glutelins.

Celiacs react to the prolamins (storage proteins) found in certain plants. Each one is distinct, and has its own name.

The prolamin in wheat is gliadin. The prolamin in rye is secalin. The prolamin in barley is hordein. These three are loosely referred to as "gluten." They are chemically similar. Persons with celiac disease must avoid all three.

Oats have a distinct prolamin named avenin. There is uncertainty about the safety of avenin for persons with celiac disease, and many avoid it. Even if avenin is safe, there is a huge risk that the oats are cross-contaminated with wheat.

Prolamins are found in other foods as well, but these are not an issue for celiacs. The prolamin in corn, zein, is sometimes labelled as "corn gluten." Corn gluten is not gluten in the sense we use the term.

If a product contains gliadin or glutenin it has wheat and must be labelled with the specific word "wheat." Secalin and hordein are not wheat, and are not covered by the labelling law.

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