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jasonD2

Confused About Something

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Ok so i understand antibodies to gluten can damage the intestines, well, what about other foods? if you're sensitive to casein or soy or corn could antibodies to these also destroy the villi? based on what i've read it seems that only gluten does tha,t but it doesnt make sense to me. so you can eliminate gluten from your diet but something else you're sensitive to can be causing problems?


Endoscopy & blood panel all negative 12/09 after being strict w/ gluten free diet

As of 8/09 - Candida Overgrowth, C.difficile overgrowth, elevated fecal anti-gliadin, elevated putrefactive SCFA's

Developed severe lactose intolerance, IBS and food sensitivities in 02 after contracting Giardia from a river in Oregon

Had negative celiac blood work in 02

Elevated stool anti-gliadin Ab (21 with 10 being cutoff for normal) - 2008

Positive for DQ8- 2008

Tested high positive for egg, dairy, soy, ginger, mustard - 2008

Lactulose/Mannitol (leaky gut) test indicated slight intestinal permeability

Improved with gluten free diet but still have spastic constipation

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Guest j_mommy

From what I understand, yes if you are intolerant to other things they can cause damage as well!!!! At teh very least...slow the healing process after a person goes gluten-free!

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Technically yes they can, but it is very, very rare.

Other foods can certainly cause symptoms, but very very few, and in very few individuals, do the foods actually cause villi blunting.

From a leading Celiac expert at Columbia University

Causes of villous atrophy apart from celiac disease

In children less than two years old, there are several causes that include cows milk allergy, soy allergy, eosinophillic gastroenteritis, and viral gastroenteritis. In adults, HIV enteropathy and tropical sprue are the most common causes of villous atrophy apart from celiac disease. Radiation may cause a similar picture as well as autoimmune enteropathy. Other food intolerances have been reported though are exceptionally rare; they include a single case report of fish and chicken intolerance.

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I've been fanatically gluten-free for 17 months, developed issues with dairy, corn and soy this summer, had an EGD 3 weeks ago that showed villious blunting. I haven't had my follow-up yet, but will interrogate the dr. about this when I do. It's a good question and makes me wonder what they would have found had I requested the EGD when I went gluten-free.

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The antibodies do not blunt the villi, the T-cells do when they release cytokines when exposed to gluten. This is an autoimmune reaction. Food allergies and intolerances are different, but they do cause symptoms.


Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.

Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

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