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blondebombshell

What Is Spelt?

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yesterday i was at a bakery that had gluten free cupcakes as well as spelt cupcakes. there was a sign up explaing what spelt was but i dont get it, lol.

is it safe for those that are gluten-free?


- gluten free since August 2007

- endoscopy came back negative for celiac in December 2007

- bloodwork confirms egg allergy

- allergy testing confirms only banana, apple, melon, egg and environmental allergies

i get hives anywhere on my waist down and less bloating/constipation when i do not eat wheat.

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nope- spelt is a variety of wheat. wikipedia explains it well.


Gluten Free since 10/07

Mildly Lactose Intolerant, slight intestinal symptoms after eating milk products, but easily corrected with lactase enzyme

Endometriosis- DX'd 5/07

Gluten Antibodies- "negative"...don't know exact numbers, am highly suspicious...

DXed celiac 12-19-07 via genetics/elimination diet- DQ2 allele

Brother with Celiac, aspergers...his tests were all negative (he didn't have genetics done), including endoscopy, but he definitely is at the least gluten intolerant...highly suspect my mother has it as well- she has hyperthyroid, fibromyalgia, hemochromatosis, and now colon cancer, and she has been weak and exhausted and just generally sick. She's going to get tested.

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Spelt is an ancient form of wheat. It can sometimes be tolerated by people with a wheat allergy, but it is not safe for those on a gluten free diet because the molecular structure is too similar. It is often marketed as "wheat free", but it is not gluten free.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spelt

Spelt (Triticum spelta) is a hexaploid species of wheat. Spelt was an important staple in parts of Europe from the Bronze Age to medieval times; it now survives as a relict crop in Central Europe and has found a new market as a health food. Spelt is sometimes considered a subspecies of the closely related species common wheat (T. aestivum), in which case its botanical name is considered to be Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta.

Spelt is closely related to common wheat, and is not suitable for people with celiac disease. It is possible that spelt is suitable for people with a wheat allergy


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

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Spelt does contain less gluten than wheat. But think about it this way - if you eat a spelt cookie or cupcake or something, that's a pretty substantial amount of spelt. If a celiac has to be careful about cross contamination and even a bread crumb can make us sick - don't you think a whole cookie, even out of spelt, is going to have more gluten in it than that. Cheating with spelt -> BAD idea.

Pauliina

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The deliberate marketing of spelt with the "implication" that it is safe for gluten intolerants or celiacs ought to be a crime.

It's like marketing beer or wine to alcoholics and saying it's much safer because it's not hard liquor like scotch or vodka.

Spelt = Wheat, as far as we are concerned.

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Spelt is SPROUTED WHEAT stay far far away from it!!!! :ph34r:


Collette

Positive Bloodwork Oct 1st 2007. Gluten-free 3 YEARS Oct 1st!

Dairy & Soy free since Dec 1st 2007.

Potato free since January 3rd 2008.

Remaining Nightshades since April 1st 2008. Back on September 2010. :)

Developed Rice & Tapioca & Corn Intolerances...

NO Carageenan.

In a constant state of evolution... sending love! :)

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