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4bakers

Help! Where Do We Start

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hi, im new here. a little about me. my 7 1/2 year old girl has been batteling stomach problems for 3 years now. we have always been told after many tests that it was just GERD. it went away for 11 months after meds and then came back with same symptoms. took her in to get more meds and the doc ran allergy blood tests(thank goodness). one cameback extremely high so we got sent over to the ped. GI. he sceduled a endoscopy. the biopsy did confirm celiac diease. my question is how do we start the diet? what do i buy at the store? is there anyone in nampa idaho that can help me? as of 2 months ago i had never even heard of this so i have a lot of questions and alot to learn. PLEASE HELP US! thanks

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Welcome.

To start with, the best way to approach this is to go back to basics and eat fresh, natural foods, like fruits, veg., meats and safe grains like rice. It's also best to avoid eating out at first until you learn which restauraunts/ menue items are safe and which questions to ask/ requests to make about ingredients and cross-contamination.

You'll need to learn how to read labels but that can be overwhelming for some at first so find a few basic safe products and add in more as you become more knowledgeable and comfortable.

Here are lists of safe/forbidden ingredients:

https://www.celiac.com/categories/Safe-Glut...6amp%3B-Ingred/

Kraft is a company that will list all gluten on the labels so just look for the words "wheat" or "barley" and if you don't see them, it's a safe product. By law, wheat is required to be listed as "wheat" but barley is not so we have to learn the ingredients that might be made from barley and contact the companies for more information. Most companies list a website or tollfree number on the packaging and you can call them or check their website and e-mail them if necessary. Not all, but many are prepared to answer our questions about whether or not a product is gluten-free.

Get a gluten-free pasta. Tinkyada is well likes by many. Don't use your old collander or strainer to drain it. You'll need to get a new one because it is very difficult to get all the sticky gluten out of those little holes.

Her food can't be cooked in old teflon or non-stick pans. You'll need to use plain metal ones or get a new non-stick for gluten-free only.

If you can find it in your area, HealthValley corn or rice crunch-ems (like CHEX) make good, economical bread crumbs for meatloaf, meatballs. You can buy fresh chicken and cut in in strips or chunks and bread and freeze it raw and deep fry straight from the freezer. I make meatballs and meatloaves in muffin tins in batches and freeze and reheat and send them with rice for my son's school lunch.

gluten-free baking is so different from how we learned to bake. To start with you may want to use a mix for breads, cookies and cake/cupcakes. There are several very good brands of cake mixes. I make them in regular size and mini cupcake tins and freeze them for snacks. Namaste is our favorite for cakes. But many others are very good too. There are alot of good options for snacks. Jello, pudding, fruit, gluten-free pretzels(are just like reg, ones)

Breads are trickier. There are alot that are unappetizing. I bake my own but only occasionally. There are some good mixes from what I hear. I haven't tried them but others may be able to make some recommedations.

There are some good pancake mixes as well. Pamela's is very good. Kinnikinnick is another brand with many products that are very popular.

There is alot of info. to digest. I'm sure you'll have more questions. Come back and ask away. Take it one day at a time and keep it as simple as possible.

There are support group contacts listed on this site and you can do an internet search for idaho celiac disease support groups as well. The Celiac Sprue Association has chapters(support groups) in many states.

http://www.csaceliacs.org/chapters.php


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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Other support groups:

http://www.celiac.org/connections.php

http://www.gluten.net/branches.htm

Unsafe Foods:

https://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsaf...ents/Page1.html

Safe Foods:

https://www.celiac.com/articles/181/1/Safe-...ents/Page1.html

Other good information:

www.celiaccentral.org

www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu

www.celiaccenter.org

http://www.celiacdisease.net/

Companies that will clearly list gluten (like Kraft)

http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/index.htm

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Danna Korn's Celiac Kids book is terrific. My 8 year old was diagnosed in December and I didn't get the book until mid-January and I wish I'd bought it sooner. It would've helped with a lot of things.

We've been doing this almost 3 months and I can tell you it really does get easier. I'm actually kind of Mary Poppinsey about the whole thing most of the time now. My son is doing so fantastic (and we didn't think he had many if any symptoms) and that is a huge motivator. I wasn't much of a cook, but I find I'm actually starting to like it and I'm even getting adventersome!

We love Pamela's Pancakes, Quinoa pasta (all kinds), Gluten Free Sensations Chocolate Chip Cookies (we took them to a dinner party last week and the other kids raved about them), and lots of rice dishes.

This site will be invaluable. It's a good place to get advice, rejoice during the high times, rant during the angry times, and even cry sometimes.

I think we're lucky that our kids are the age they are. My son has adjusted to the diet incredibly well and we have the opportunity to help them learn to live with it. We've already stepped up the cooking lessons around here. :)

Welcome to the family!!

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Welcome.

To start with, the best way to approach this is to go back to basics and eat fresh, natural foods, like fruits, veg., meats and safe grains like rice. It's also best to avoid eating out at first until you learn which restauraunts/ menue items are safe and which questions to ask/ requests to make about ingredients and cross-contamination.

You'll need to learn how to read labels but that can be overwhelming for some at first so find a few basic safe products and add in more as you become more knowledgeable and comfortable.

Here are lists of safe/forbidden ingredients:

https://www.celiac.com/categories/Safe-Glut...6amp%3B-Ingred/

Kraft is a company that will list all gluten on the labels so just look for the words "wheat" or "barley" and if you don't see them, it's a safe product. By law, wheat is required to be listed as "wheat" but barley is not so we have to learn the ingredients that might be made from barley and contact the companies for more information. Most companies list a website or tollfree number on the packaging and you can call them or check their website and e-mail them if necessary. Not all, but many are prepared to answer our questions about whether or not a product is gluten-free.

Get a gluten-free pasta. Tinkyada is well likes by many. Don't use your old collander or strainer to drain it. You'll need to get a new one because it is very difficult to get all the sticky gluten out of those little holes.

Her food can't be cooked in old teflon or non-stick pans. You'll need to use plain metal ones or get a new non-stick for gluten-free only.

If you can find it in your area, HealthValley corn or rice crunch-ems (like CHEX) make good, economical bread crumbs for meatloaf, meatballs. You can buy fresh chicken and cut in in strips or chunks and bread and freeze it raw and deep fry straight from the freezer. I make meatballs and meatloaves in muffin tins in batches and freeze and reheat and send them with rice for my son's school lunch.

gluten-free baking is so different from how we learned to bake. To start with you may want to use a mix for breads, cookies and cake/cupcakes. There are several very good brands of cake mixes. I make them in regular size and mini cupcake tins and freeze them for snacks. Namaste is our favorite for cakes. But many others are very good too. There are alot of good options for snacks. Jello, pudding, fruit, gluten-free pretzels(are just like reg, ones)

Breads are trickier. There are alot that are unappetizing. I bake my own but only occasionally. There are some good mixes from what I hear. I haven't tried them but others may be able to make some recommedations.

There are some good pancake mixes as well. Pamela's is very good. Kinnikinnick is another brand with many products that are very popular.

There is alot of info. to digest. I'm sure you'll have more questions. Come back and ask away. Take it one day at a time and keep it as simple as possible.

There are support group contacts listed on this site and you can do an internet search for idaho celiac disease support groups as well. The Celiac Sprue Association has chapters(support groups) in many states.

http://www.csaceliacs.org/chapters.php

thank you so much i will have more questions and trust me i will ask them. thanks again

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Danna Korn's Celiac Kids book is terrific. My 8 year old was diagnosed in December and I didn't get the book until mid-January and I wish I'd bought it sooner. It would've helped with a lot of things.

We've been doing this almost 3 months and I can tell you it really does get easier. I'm actually kind of Mary Poppinsey about the whole thing most of the time now. My son is doing so fantastic (and we didn't think he had many if any symptoms) and that is a huge motivator. I wasn't much of a cook, but I find I'm actually starting to like it and I'm even getting adventersome!

We love Pamela's Pancakes, Quinoa pasta (all kinds), Gluten Free Sensations Chocolate Chip Cookies (we took them to a dinner party last week and the other kids raved about them), and lots of rice dishes.

This site will be invaluable. It's a good place to get advice, rejoice during the high times, rant during the angry times, and even cry sometimes.

I think we're lucky that our kids are the age they are. My son has adjusted to the diet incredibly well and we have the opportunity to help them learn to live with it. We've already stepped up the cooking lessons around here. :)

Welcome to the family!!

we just got the choc. chip cookies last night and she loves them. i do agree with you about how lucky we are that our kids are not older that they are. i am extremely happy that we got a diagnosis. we finally figured out her pain and now we have to get her better. we have all decited to go gluten-free as a family. thanks again!

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4bakers, if she has any favourites that you are having problems replacing, let us know. We can steer you towards a good gluten-free product or a recipe. My daughter handled it great and I think a lot of that has to do with the fact that I found good substitutes for all of her favourites. Some are specialty gluten-free products, some were just a matter of switching brands and some were just introducing a new product altogether. She doesn't care for the gluten-free bread (only when it's fresh out of the oven) but she had never had rice cakes before and that is how she eats her peanut butter now.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

animal0028.gif

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Are you, by chance, from Eastern Idaho? Just curious. I was just thinking that I could use someone to talk/rant to who actually knows what I'm dealing with. The links that happygirl posted list support groups in a few different parts of the state. THANKS HAPPYGIRL! I just viewed another thread on this forum that mentioned some gluten-free businesses in the Boise/Meridian area (including a pizza place, OMG!) :D

Best of luck!

-D

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we have all decited to go gluten-free as a family. thanks again!

Our house is gluten free as well (with the exception of cereal that I eat after his bedtime because it's cheaper than gluten-free cereal). I couldn't handle a mixed household. CC stresses me out too much. And with all the adjustments to increased cooking, I didn't want the extra hassle of being extra careful/extra cleaning, etc. This way I don't freak out when I see crumbs on the counter. Although we have a strict "If it fell on the counter/table/floor/anywhere not your plate" I eat it or it goes in the trash. I think it's a good habit for when he isn't at home. The 3 second rule just doesn't cut it anymore. Of course this meant that the other day when he spilled a bunch of cashews on the counter and started to throw them away I ended up eating them - I don't even like cashews, but they're expensive!! :lol:

I know others have shared the thoughts that living in a mixed environment helps them to learn what it is like in the "real" world, but I just couldn't handle it. And I think it's nice for him to have a safe haven where he can relax. Aaaand, the more time I spend on this site the more convinced I am that no one should be eating gluten, so it's healthier for all of us. :)

As for those yummy chocolate chip cookies, I made them again tonight for some friends that came to dinner (gluten-free meal of tacos, fruit and veggies) and everyone LOVED them. I was starting to think I was just used to gluten-free foods and that's why I liked them so much, but clearly not. No one can tell they're gluten-free!!

Have a great gluten-free weekend!!

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Are you, by chance, from Eastern Idaho? Just curious. I was just thinking that I could use someone to talk/rant to who actually knows what I'm dealing with. The links that happygirl posted list support groups in a few different parts of the state. THANKS HAPPYGIRL! I just viewed another thread on this forum that mentioned some gluten-free businesses in the Boise/Meridian area (including a pizza place, OMG!) :D

Best of luck!

-D

no im in the boise area. so where are these gluten-free bussinesses at? please let me know. thanks

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Our house is gluten free as well (with the exception of cereal that I eat after his bedtime because it's cheaper than gluten-free cereal). I couldn't handle a mixed household. CC stresses me out too much. And with all the adjustments to increased cooking, I didn't want the extra hassle of being extra careful/extra cleaning, etc. This way I don't freak out when I see crumbs on the counter. Although we have a strict "If it fell on the counter/table/floor/anywhere not your plate" I eat it or it goes in the trash. I think it's a good habit for when he isn't at home. The 3 second rule just doesn't cut it anymore. Of course this meant that the other day when he spilled a bunch of cashews on the counter and started to throw them away I ended up eating them - I don't even like cashews, but they're expensive!! :lol:

I know others have shared the thoughts that living in a mixed environment helps them to learn what it is like in the "real" world, but I just couldn't handle it. And I think it's nice for him to have a safe haven where he can relax. Aaaand, the more time I spend on this site the more convinced I am that no one should be eating gluten, so it's healthier for all of us. :)

As for those yummy chocolate chip cookies, I made them again tonight for some friends that came to dinner (gluten-free meal of tacos, fruit and veggies) and everyone LOVED them. I was starting to think I was just used to gluten-free foods and that's why I liked them so much, but clearly not. No one can tell they're gluten-free!!

Have a great gluten-free weekend!!

i totally agree with you. as if its not hard enough being a mom, i actually thought things were starting to become normal and now the lord throws me a curve ball. i will get the hang of this it might take a little bit! thanks

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Here is a quote from a forum at www.celiac.com/blogs/6/Nampa-Boise-Idaho.html

"Yes, there is a celiac support group that meets , like every other month in Meridian at St. Lukes. Jakes Gluten Free store is where we found out about a group. 322-5935. also, Cliff's in Caldwell sell gluten free & posted a letter from the support group. My husband been diagnosed about a month. We went to the last meeting--very helpful."

I have seen online that the Boise food co-op has a gluten-free section. Also, I found a website for a gluten-free pizza crust business in Kuna: http://www.glutenfreepizza.com/

It looks like Jakes Gluten Free store is actually in Meridian. You will probably get better info than I can find online about local businesses by talking to people at Jakes, the Boise co-op, or a support group.

I was raised in the Treasure Valley, but I've lived in Eastern Idaho for 16 years. Good luck--my best to you and your family.

-D

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