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Can Something Be Gluten-free But Still Contain Wheat?

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My sister and I were having this discussion the other day since she has an actual allergy to wheat.

i was telling her how I saw gluten-free beer at Summerfest (in Miwaukee..New Grist beer), and she asked me if it had wheat in it. I responded.."of course not!" I know the gluten-free beers do not contain wheat, but she was saying how even if something going through the distilling process and is "gluten-free", but made with wheat, she would still react to it, even if a celiac without an allergy would not.

I guess, she is referring to wheat-basked vodkas?

I am still too nervous to try wheat-basked vodkas (my previous drink of choice), even though I have read by some it is safe.

Any thoughts on the gluten-free, but still containing wheat issue?

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A product cannot be gluten free and contain a detectable level of wheat.

A product can be wheat free, yet not gluten free.

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A product cannot be gluten free and contain a detectable level of wheat.

A product can be wheat free, yet not gluten free.

This is exactly what I said, but she said that was not true....that something can actually be gluten-free, as in alchol, but still cause a reaction, because of the wheat <_<

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This is exactly what I said, but she said that was not true....that something can actually be gluten-free, as in alchol, but still cause a reaction, because of the wheat <_<

My experience is the same as your sisters. I definately have a gluten reaction to distilled gluten grains in alcohol and vinegars. I do not have a histamine (allergic) reaction the reaction is the same as it is when I accidentally ingest gluten. Fortunately for most though this is not the case and most celiacs are able to tolerate distilled gluten grains.

The only way you would have to know for sure would be to challenge and see if you react.

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This is exactly what I said, but she said that was not true....that something can actually be gluten-free, as in alchol, but still cause a reaction, because of the wheat <_<

Even though, distilled alcohol is considered safe for Celiac to consume, I have known several super sensitve who will react to distilled grain based fluids, even though no detectable level remains.

So maybe this debate may not have a conclusion? :( Maybe some people have to determine what level is safe for them.

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a gluten-free label just means "no gluten detected" and that's usually subject to the test's limits, like 20ppm. a gluten-free label does *not* mandate "no gluten ingredients".

that being said, we've had the distillation discussion a number of times. the collective hive mind came to pretty much the conclusion that mamma goose left - in theory, a thorough distillation should remove all gluten, but <insert excruciating chemistry discussion here>, it may possibly allow for the tiniest levels of contamination that extraordinarily sensitive people react to.

of course, beer is not distilled, so that bit doesn't even come into play. so, if you see a gluten-free beer, it is *HIGHLY* unlikely to have ever had a wheat based ingredient in it.

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Any grain can be cross contaminated in the harvesting process. I am sure all grains have a detectable amount of gluten, be it 20ppm, 10ppm, or 5ppm. There are many of us who cannot tolerate any gluten above 5ppm. They can not test for any less than 5ppm, we just are not capable of it yet. Gluten free does not mean there is no gluten, it simply means the gluten falls below the FDA standard. I believe your sister is correct, they use corn for gluten-free beer, or sorghum, which is still a grain, and it can be CC's.

http://www.gluten.net/FDADraftRuling.htm

FDA Unveils the Draft Ruling for gluten-free Labeling.

On Jan 22, 2007 the Food and Drug Administration released the Proposed Rule for Food Labeling: Gluten-Free Labeling of Foods. (Docket No. 2005N-0279).

The draft ruling defines the guidelines for voluntary Gluten-Free labeling of foods.

A summary of the 95 page document:

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This is exactly what I said, but she said that was not true....that something can actually be gluten-free, as in alchol, but still cause a reaction, because of the wheat <_<

Then it's not gluten free either. I wouldn't personally put anything that came from wheat in my body. I don't care how much it had been distilled.

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