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shepgs

Frustrated With My Mom's Doc

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My mother has severe RA. I think she is finally listening to me about gluten probably playing a role in it. I sent her a list of tests to have her rheumatologist run. Since I went the route of Enterolab, I just pulled the list from online.

DGP (Deamidated gliadin peptide antibody)

tTG-IgA or tissue transglutaminase-IgA

AGA-IgG or Antigliadin IgG

AGA-IgA or Antigliadin IGA

Total IGA

EMA (Immunoglobulin A anti-endomysium antibodies)

HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 gene tests

The doctor said the only one she might need is the tTG-IgA one. Grrrr... Will that alone be of any use when she gets the results?

Regardless, she has decided that going gluten-free would probably benefit her anyway. That's the good thing. Now I just have to begin the process of educating her on how to do it completely, not just half-way.


Wife to very supportive husband/Mom to 4 wonderful kids, ages 3 to 17

Enterolab: elevated antigliadin = gluten sensitivity; gene test = double DQB1 linked to gluten sensitivity

Family history:

maternal grandmother - life-threatening food allergies

mother - severe rheumatoid arthritis

cousin - type 1 diabetes

father & sister - peripheral neuropathy

son 1 - asthma, eczema; positive Enterolab 3/26/10

son - life-threatening food allergies

All this has led me to be gluten-free as of 2/1/2010.

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the doc is having my other children tested and those labs are the:

TTG IGA (which I guess is the main important one)

and then Total IGA.

Hope this helps :)


Son officially diagnosed 3.18.10 with celiac biopsy results. age 12.

daughter, 10, diagnosed fructose intolerant 2009.

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No, the tTg IgA alone is pretty useless. If he had done at least a total serum IgA as well, to find out of she's IgA deficient (which affects a decent number of celiacs - 10%?) then it wouldn't be worthless, but wouldn't be all that great. The whole point is that the tests need to be done and analyzed in concert. Her doc's clearly kinda useless on the issue.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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If you are going to do gene testing make sure you go to someplace that tests for all the genes, there are 9 currently known to be celiac related. I had my genes tested a few years after diagnosis and found I have 2 copies of DQ9 which is considered an RA gene here in the US but is a recognized celiac related gene in some other countries. I am glad to hear she is going to try the diet, she should be very strict when she does it. Do make sure she is done with all testing they are going to do first. I hope she sees as good a resolution of her arthritis as I did. It did take a few months but by month six mine was in 'remission' and only flares when I get glutened.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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If you are going to do gene testing make sure you go to someplace that tests for all the genes, there are 9 currently known to be celiac related. I had my genes tested a few years after diagnosis and found I have 2 copies of DQ9 which is considered an RA gene here in the US but is a recognized celiac related gene in some other countries. I am glad to hear she is going to try the diet, she should be very strict when she does it. Do make sure she is done with all testing they are going to do first. I hope she sees as good a resolution of her arthritis as I did. It did take a few months but by month six mine was in 'remission' and only flares when I get glutened.

Could you tell me about these other celiac genes? I did have mine tested through Enterolab. Do they test for all the ones you are referring to?

My mom has damage that is irreversible, having had more surgeries than I can count on both hands. :( However, I'm hoping a gluten-free diet would slow down or stop more inflammation and future damage. Her doc yesterday is wanting to switch her meds b/c of the inflammation - but didn't want to look in this direction. Maybe someday the medical community will catch on.

That is so great that you were able to see resolution of your RA! I'm hoping to prevent it before even developing it.


Wife to very supportive husband/Mom to 4 wonderful kids, ages 3 to 17

Enterolab: elevated antigliadin = gluten sensitivity; gene test = double DQB1 linked to gluten sensitivity

Family history:

maternal grandmother - life-threatening food allergies

mother - severe rheumatoid arthritis

cousin - type 1 diabetes

father & sister - peripheral neuropathy

son 1 - asthma, eczema; positive Enterolab 3/26/10

son - life-threatening food allergies

All this has led me to be gluten-free as of 2/1/2010.

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Could you tell me about these other celiac genes? I did have mine tested through Enterolab. Do they test for all the ones you are referring to?

My mom has damage that is irreversible, having had more surgeries than I can count on both hands. :( However, I'm hoping a gluten-free diet would slow down or stop more inflammation and future damage. Her doc yesterday is wanting to switch her meds b/c of the inflammation - but didn't want to look in this direction. Maybe someday the medical community will catch on.

That is so great that you were able to see resolution of your RA! I'm hoping to prevent it before even developing it.

Yes it was Enterolab that I used. I don't know if there are other places that test for all the genes now known but there may be.

Yea I have irreversible damage also but no where near as bad as it sounds like your Moms is. My hands still look 'knobby' but I can move and use them. Before diagnosis I couldn't even hold a cup by the handle or write with a pen or even type on a keyboard most days. Hopefully the diet will relieve the inflammation for her also.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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