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RiceGuy

Uprisings - Reaching New Heights In Gluten-Free Baking

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Glad you're already having some success! Once you've used up the mix with xanthan, and start using guar gum instead, I'm sure you'll see dramatic improvement in the finished height.

Oh, I meant to report, that I tried the guar gum and oil method for preventing the bread from sticking to the pan, and although it is better than nothing, it doesn't work anywhere near as well as the lecithin. I guess that explains why I hadn't tried it in awhile.

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Riceguy, I need help in NOT making bricks.

Can you or anyone tell me exactly, like I have never cooked before how to make your gluten-free bread.

FYI: I am mixing by hand and cooking in a pyrex dish in my oven.

How much tsp (not gram ) yeast per c. flour mix, how much guar gum & p.husk per c. flour mix to use, how long to rise (which hasn't happened yet) what is warm exactly for gluten-free flour ,70 ,80, 90 degrees. ? What do I do with the yeast, mix straight into the flour or 1st in warm water w/sugar ????? I never baked non gluten-free bread before this change so I am unfamiliar with it's needs.

As Denzel said in The Philadelphia story. Explain it to me like I am a 6 yr old. Step by step. measurement by measurement.

Is there a general rule for yeast to gluten-free flour ratio, and guar gum/p.husk to gluten-free flour ratio in case I want to try with different flours?

My chickens are getting tired of my mistakes, but the squirrels are waiting by my door. :) These are just too bad for breadcrumbs.

Maureen

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Riceguy, I need help in NOT making bricks.

Can you or anyone tell me exactly, like I have never cooked before how to make your gluten-free bread.

FYI: I am mixing by hand and cooking in a pyrex dish in my oven.

How much tsp (not gram ) yeast per c. flour mix, how much guar gum & p.husk per c. flour mix to use, how long to rise (which hasn't happened yet) what is warm exactly for gluten-free flour ,70 ,80, 90 degrees. ? What do I do with the yeast, mix straight into the flour or 1st in warm water w/sugar ????? I never baked non gluten-free bread before this change so I am unfamiliar with it's needs.

As Denzel said in The Philadelphia story. Explain it to me like I am a 6 yr old. Step by step. measurement by measurement.

Is there a general rule for yeast to gluten-free flour ratio, and guar gum/p.husk to gluten-free flour ratio in case I want to try with different flours?

My chickens are getting tired of my mistakes, but the squirrels are waiting by my door. :) These are just too bad for breadcrumbs.

Maureen

OK.

The general rule (and what I use in the recipe I described in the first post) is one tsp guar gum per cup of flour. I use the same measurement for the ground psyllium husk. Some people like more of a yeasty taste than I do. The amount I use is probably less than 1/2 tsp per cup of flour (I've never measured - I just sprinkle it in by eye). A single packet of yeast is about 2-1/4 tsp, which is typically used for one loaf. However, I believe that would be for one of those large loaf pans. I also use a pyrex dish, which is 4x8 (inches). Too little yeast and it will either not rise, or take a very long time. Too much and it will taste too yeasty.

Although you can "proof" the yeast in warm water first, it is generally not necessary for dry active yeast, unless you're not sure of the freshness. I use warm tap water. Not steaming hot, but pretty warm. I usually put some water in the bowl with the dry ingredients, then sprinkle the yeast into the water. This ensures that it gets wet and activated. I have always mixed by hand. I never try to add all the water at once. Rather, I start with what I'm sure is less than what will be needed, mix it in, and add a bit more, mixing after each addition, until the consistency is right. You can always add more water, but once you've added it, you can't take it back out. I think the amount of water will be a little less than half of the volume of flour, but it has been so long since I've taken any measurements, I'm not quite sure. However, it can vary depending on the types and quality of flour, so I'd never suggest adding it all at once.

Spoon the dough into the greased pan (see earlier post for my use of lecithin). I find it helps avoid large air pockets under the dough by starting with a small amount, just to cover the bottom with a thin layer. The glass dish makes it easy too see how you're doing. Then add the rest, and smooth it out as best you can with the back of a spoon. Avoid wetting the spoon until the dough is close to what you want, so you won't be softening the dough too much. Wetting the spoon helps keep the dough from sticking to it while you smooth the dough, but avoid using too much water, as that will make the top of the dough too soft. I find this recipe turns out best if the dough is slightly convex, not perfectly flat. It tends to rise much flatter than it starts out, so a slight bulge works nicely.

Cover the pan with plastic wrap or foil. This keeps the dough from drying out. I generally use a flat piece of foil, not crimped around the edge of the pan. This makes it easy to slip off when it's time to bake, so having enough overlap to grab onto is a good idea. I allow the dough to rise in the warm oven. You can turn your oven on for a minute or so to get it warm inside, about 90-100°F works well. I don't have a thermometer for this. I just judge by the warmth of the glass door, which will feel like a window with the sun shining on it. Boost the temp every so often, as needed.

I find that the rise time is usually less than one hour for this recipe. It has been taking about 50 minutes I think. I don't go by the clock, but by the height of the dough relative to the original unrisen height. This recipe is unlike any other that I know of, in that most if not all the rise is achieved before baking. I let the dough rise to about 3.75x. Depending on the exact recipe, it may be able to go a bit higher, but I find 4x is pushing it most times. It generally goes just over 4x while baking, then back to about 4x. Depending on the quality of the flours you've used, you may find the optimum is slightly different. The amount of water can also influence the max height.

Once the dough has fully risen, I set the oven to bake at about 350-375°F, and wait a minute or two for it to start getting hot inside. Then I open the door just long enough to slip off the foil. Use an oven mitt - better safe than sorry. Bake until the top is golden, or to your preference. Allow to cool for maybe 6-10 minutes on a cooling rack or on the oven rack with the door open and the rack forward. Put the pan on its side, and carefully tip it to allow the bread to slip out onto the rack. Loosen the sides with a butter knife or flat spatula if necessary. Getting the bread out of the pan early enough for the steam to escape ensures that the bottom won't become wet from condensation.

I hope I have provided adequate details. If you need more info, just ask.

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RiceGuy, here are the flours I have on hand:

White Rice Flour

Brown Rice Flour

Glutinous (sweet) Rice Flour

Sorghum Flour 'Sweet' White

Millet Flour

Buckwheat Flour (light)

Flax Seed Meal

Corn Starch

Potato Starch

Potato Flour

Tapioca Flour

Corn Flour

Yellow Corn Meal

Garbanzo Bean Flour (almost gone but could pick up more)

Also these (not flours):

Quinoa

Millet (whole)

Flax Seeds (whole)

Sunflower Seeds

Yeast (both active and rapid rise)

Xanthan Gum

All of these things were purchased locally but if there's something else that would help, I wouldn't mind picking up a couple of other things. Any suggestions you have would be most appreciated to be able to bake a really good loaf of bread. I might add that I've only been gluten free since April 9 so I may have not yet adjusted to the taste of gluten free breads. Thanks in advance!

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RiceGuy, here are the flours I have on hand:

White Rice Flour

Brown Rice Flour

Glutinous (sweet) Rice Flour

Sorghum Flour 'Sweet' White

Millet Flour

Buckwheat Flour (light)

Flax Seed Meal

Corn Starch

Potato Starch

Potato Flour

Tapioca Flour

Corn Flour

Yellow Corn Meal

Garbanzo Bean Flour (almost gone but could pick up more)

Also these (not flours):

Quinoa

Millet (whole)

Flax Seeds (whole)

Sunflower Seeds

Yeast (both active and rapid rise)

Xanthan Gum

All of these things were purchased locally but if there's something else that would help, I wouldn't mind picking up a couple of other things. Any suggestions you have would be most appreciated to be able to bake a really good loaf of bread. I might add that I've only been gluten free since April 9 so I may have not yet adjusted to the taste of gluten free breads. Thanks in advance!

OK. Perhaps the most important things you'll need to get are the guar gum and ground psyllium husk. Although ivory teff flour might be tough to approximate with what you have, I suppose the brown rice flour is the next closest thing. It's been awhile since I tried any starches, but I think replacing sweet potato flour is probably not going to be particularly easy. It's not gummy like sweet rice flour, nor brittle like tapioca. I've never tried cornstarch, potato starch, or potato flour, so I can't comment on those. Perhaps a blend of all of those would be better than just one of them.

So, a guess at a blend using only what you have would be:

2 parts brown rice flour

3 parts sorghum flour

1 part sweet rice flour

1 part tapioca starch/flour

1 part potato flour

However, I can virtually guaranty it won't turn out as nicely as the blend I specified in the first post. There is of course, a matter of preference as well. What you consider good tasting bread may not be what I'd call good at all. I grew up on whole grain bread, and that's what I like. If you're only interested in "white bread", then I'd say sweet potato flour would be even more vital an ingredient for you. It provides that texture and chewiness better than any other flour I've tried. I think the satisfaction we derive from breads depends as much (or more) on texture as it does on flavor.

If you're going to try the above blend, I'd suggest doing so in a small dish before attempting a whole loaf. A small pyrex dish, such as this one or this one, works nicely with 1/2 cup of flour, and yields a good sized roll/bun. Use one Tbsp for each part, which will conveniently total 1/2 cup of flour. The amount for both guar gum and psyllium would then be 1/2 tsp each. 1/4 tsp active dry yeast should work fine. Add a pinch of salt too. See my previous post for additional details.

If you like the flavor of rye bread, you can add about 1 tsp caraway seed. I like adding some dry minced or powdered onion too. Some extra salt seems to enhance the flavor as well.

I really think the guar gum and psyllium combo has potential for many bread recipes, because of the advantages I outlined in the first post. But the better the blend, the higher is seems able to rise without falling. So you may find it works better to only let it rise to 3x instead, if not using sweet potato flour.

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Thanks, RiceGuy! Guess I'll have to get the guar gum and psyllium to play around with this. Do you buy them locally - like at a health food store? If I have to order online, I might just get the sweet potato flour, too, since you feel it works so well. I never knew there was such a thing before you mentioned it.

I like the idea of working with a small amount of flour so if it doesn't turn out, I wouldn't be wasting that much. I don't have a small glass Pyrex dish but do have a couple of small CorningWare dishes that would probably work.

Would spraying the dish with a cooking spray work? I just checked mine and it does have lecithin in it.

My preferred bread pre-celiac was whole wheat unless I bought crusty French or Italian bread to make garlic bread.

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Until a couple weeks ago, the only bread we had was what I made from our own home ground wheat, kamut, rye, spelt, etc. I almost never added white flour so we're used to heavy, dense bread. I also made sourdough with no yeast that tasted like cheese, I put mixed cracked grains in it. Could only make that in the winter, it didn't work well in summer. Ah well, doesn't matter now. <_< Unless someone can tell me how to make it gluten free.

I ordered sweet potato, black bean and yellow pea flour and some other stuff from Barry Farms on Sunday and got it today. I'm impressed! Too hot here to bake today, and I was busy with other stuff. Maybe tomorrow, and it will be baked in the grill if I get to doing a test loaf. My husband is intrigued by "sweet potato flour"! Another Food Adventure! :)

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Thanks, RiceGuy! Guess I'll have to get the guar gum and psyllium to play around with this. Do you buy them locally - like at a health food store? If I have to order online, I might just get the sweet potato flour, too, since you feel it works so well. I never knew there was such a thing before you mentioned it.

I like the idea of working with a small amount of flour so if it doesn't turn out, I wouldn't be wasting that much. I don't have a small glass Pyrex dish but do have a couple of small CorningWare dishes that would probably work.

Would spraying the dish with a cooking spray work? I just checked mine and it does have lecithin in it.

My preferred bread pre-celiac was whole wheat unless I bought crusty French or Italian bread to make garlic bread.

Your local health food store should have the guar gum and psyllium. Just make sure they are powdered, as I've seen guar gum in pill form, which obviously won't work. I do usually buy them online, at the site I linked to in a previous post.

The Corningware dish should work, though not being transparent, you'll have to use some other method to check the rising. Perhaps a glass lid or saucer, so you won't have to lift it open to see the dough. Otherwise it'd tend to dry out and may fail to rise properly.

The cooking spray should work fine, I'd think.

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Your local health food store should have the guar gum and psyllium. Just make sure they are powdered, as I've seen guar gum in pill form, which obviously won't work. I do usually buy them online, at the site I linked to in a previous post.

The Corningware dish should work, though not being transparent, you'll have to use some other method to check the rising. Perhaps a glass lid or saucer, so you won't have to lift it open to see the dough. Otherwise it'd tend to dry out and may fail to rise properly.

The cooking spray should work fine, I'd think.

Thanks for your quick reply!!! I pulled up the Barry Farm website last night and after looking at their prices, I'm sure I could get several things (including a lb. of ivory teff and sweet potato flours) for probably less than I could get the two other things at my local health food store. Glad to hear the cooking spray should work as I don't feel like getting a lb. of lecithin granules. Shipping shouldn't be too bad as I live in Pennsylvania and I believe they're in Ohio.

I need to go to Wal-Mart today so will see if I can buy a small Pyrex glass baking dish or two. I do have a glass lid for one of the CorningWare dishes and I've also used plastic wrap (sprayed with cooking spray) to cover other breads when rising.

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Thanks for your quick reply!!! I pulled up the Barry Farm website last night and after looking at their prices, I'm sure I could get several things (including a lb. of ivory teff and sweet potato flours) for probably less than I could get the two other things at my local health food store. Glad to hear the cooking spray should work as I don't feel like getting a lb. of lecithin granules. Shipping shouldn't be too bad as I live in Pennsylvania and I believe they're in Ohio.

I need to go to Wal-Mart today so will see if I can buy a small Pyrex glass baking dish or two. I do have a glass lid for one of the CorningWare dishes and I've also used plastic wrap (sprayed with cooking spray) to cover other breads when rising.

Sounds good. I didn't suggest the plastic wrap, for the simple reason that when peeling it off, it'd be nearly impossible not to disturb the bowl, and possibly causing the dough to collapse.

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Sounds good. I didn't suggest the plastic wrap, for the simple reason that when peeling it off, it'd be nearly impossible not to disturb the bowl, and possibly causing the dough to collapse.

Thanks...will take your suggestion! I bit the bullet and just ordered the guar gum, psyllium husks (ground), teff and sweet potato flours from Barry Farm. Price was good...$13.32 plus $8.19 shipping. Now I can't wait to get them to get started. biggrin.gif

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What has worked for me in the past with other recipes is to brush the plastic wrap with oil, or spray with Pam, before putting it over the loaf to raise. I have also spritzed with water and left it in a warm oven and that has worked well with other recipes. I will cover it from now on though, I think I do get a better proof with the dough covered.

Laura

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RiceGuy, I did pick up Pyrex clear glass bowls at Wal-Mart the other day...they came in a set of 3 with red lids so as soon as my order from Barry Farm arrives, I'm ready to try your original recipe (your first post in this thread).

A quick question...approximately how long do you bake your mini-loaves of bread? I figure since it's done in a glass bowl, I'd probably bake at 350

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A quick question...approximately how long do you bake your mini-loaves of bread? I figure since it's done in a glass bowl, I'd probably bake at 350°.

It generally takes about 20-25 minutes, at around 350°F. I find the exact time varies depending upon the precise amount of water, and how browned I make the crust. I'm still working on ways to get better browning. Come to think of it, I don't recall trying 400°F or more with this recipe. Maybe that'll make a browner crust.

I really like these bowls for making buns and such. The 1/2 cup of flour makes 1/2 inch of dough, and when risen to 4x, that's two inches, which is the inside height of the bowl. But for burger buns, I've had to reduce the amount of dough, simply because the burger+bun is too tall for me to bite into! :lol:

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I really like these bowls for making buns and such. The 1/2 cup of flour makes 1/2 inch of dough, and when risen to 4x, that's two inches, which is the inside height of the bowl. But for burger buns, I've had to reduce the amount of dough, simply because the burger+bun is too tall for me to bite into! laugh.gif

HaHa! I don't think I would be able to bite into them either. Maybe I could get two buns out of one batch.

Do you store these flours in the fridge?

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OK, I've done some experiments. For several days I couldn't have the oven on for baking, it was just too hot. So I made bread in the gas grill. I did this recipe and another one that has been our standby for now but is just too light and fluffy.

The sweet potato/teff loaf did not turn out well, but I know what went wrong. I not only goofed with the proofing but then when it was baking, the gas tank ran dry and it sat for a while NOT baking while I didn't know the tank was done. Sigh.

So today, I baked again. Nice and cool here this morning so I could bake indoors. I mix my bread in my Kitchen Aid mixer and mixed the dough for 3 minutes with the paddle, just because that's what I have done with other breads that turn out well. I'll put my exact recipe below. I raised it UNCOVERED on top of the stove while another loaf baked. I had a pan with very hot water in it, and sat the bread pan over that and sort of tented it with foil. I didn't want to put plastic wrap on again because it caused problems with the other loaf, sticking to the dough because it rose so fast. I think it was humid enough that it didn't dry out, but not humid enough to wet the dough. I usually proof my bread in the oven with the light on and a pan of water underneath that has been heated to boiling.

This bread is OK. I like that it has no eggs or oil. It rose well and baked with almost no loss in height. It is heavy, good solid bread and the only problem, besides a slight tendency to crumble at the shoulders while slicing, is that the flavor isn't really remarkable. It's OK, improves with butter according to those who tried it that way, and will make OK sandwiches.

Here is the recipe I used:

1 cup ivory teff

1 1/2 cups sorghum

1 1/2 cups sweet potato flour

1 tablespoon yeast

4 teaspoons guar gum

4 teaspoons psyllium powder

1 tablespoon sea salt

Put dry ingredients in bowl of mixer and allow to mix on low with paddle while measuring and heating the water.

Add 2 cups warm water and 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. When all combined, I turned the mixer on high and beat for about 3 minutes. The dough was the consistency of thick cookie dough. Spooned into a oiled and rice-floured sandwich loaf pan that measures 11 X 4 1/2 X 3 inches high. I smoothed it flat with wet fingers and let raise about 40 minutes or until more than doubled. Baked at 375 for one hour. Thermometer stuck into center read 200 degrees.

The top did not brown, looks very white and my first thought was "Tales From the Crypt"! The bread is heavy but not dry or too wet, holds together OK but it does crumble a bit, and has thick crust. There are no big holes, it is pretty uniform through out the slice.

I'm wondering what can be done to enhance the flavor of this bread. Maybe onion and caraway?

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HaHa! I don't think I would be able to bite into them either. Maybe I could get two buns out of one batch.

Do you store these flours in the fridge?

I generally keep about one month's worth of flour out at room temp, with the rest kept double-sealed in freezer bags in the freezer. Always allow the frozen flour to sit at room temp for several hours before opening the sealed bag. I like to pull them out a day before I need them so they sit overnight. Otherwise moisture from the air will condense on the cold flour, causing early spoilage.

OK, I've done some experiments. For several days I couldn't have the oven on for baking, it was just too hot. So I made bread in the gas grill. I did this recipe and another one that has been our standby for now but is just too light and fluffy.

The sweet potato/teff loaf did not turn out well, but I know what went wrong. I not only goofed with the proofing but then when it was baking, the gas tank ran dry and it sat for a while NOT baking while I didn't know the tank was done. Sigh.

So today, I baked again. Nice and cool here this morning so I could bake indoors. I mix my bread in my Kitchen Aid mixer and mixed the dough for 3 minutes with the paddle, just because that's what I have done with other breads that turn out well. I'll put my exact recipe below. I raised it UNCOVERED on top of the stove while another loaf baked. I had a pan with very hot water in it, and sat the bread pan over that and sort of tented it with foil. I didn't want to put plastic wrap on again because it caused problems with the other loaf, sticking to the dough because it rose so fast. I think it was humid enough that it didn't dry out, but not humid enough to wet the dough. I usually proof my bread in the oven with the light on and a pan of water underneath that has been heated to boiling.

This bread is OK. I like that it has no eggs or oil. It rose well and baked with almost no loss in height. It is heavy, good solid bread and the only problem, besides a slight tendency to crumble at the shoulders while slicing, is that the flavor isn't really remarkable. It's OK, improves with butter according to those who tried it that way, and will make OK sandwiches.

Here is the recipe I used:

1 cup ivory teff

1 1/2 cups sorghum

1 1/2 cups sweet potato flour

1 tablespoon yeast

4 teaspoons guar gum

4 teaspoons psyllium powder

1 tablespoon sea salt

Put dry ingredients in bowl of mixer and allow to mix on low with paddle while measuring and heating the water.

Add 2 cups warm water and 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. When all combined, I turned the mixer on high and beat for about 3 minutes. The dough was the consistency of thick cookie dough. Spooned into a oiled and rice-floured sandwich loaf pan that measures 11 X 4 1/2 X 3 inches high. I smoothed it flat with wet fingers and let raise about 40 minutes or until more than doubled. Baked at 375 for one hour. Thermometer stuck into center read 200 degrees.

The top did not brown, looks very white and my first thought was "Tales From the Crypt"! The bread is heavy but not dry or too wet, holds together OK but it does crumble a bit, and has thick crust. There are no big holes, it is pretty uniform through out the slice.

I'm wondering what can be done to enhance the flavor of this bread. Maybe onion and caraway?

First, you need to completely cover the loaf for rising. Even wheat breads benefit from this, but gluten-free bread dough tends to dry out more easily. That will likely prevent a full rise, and it is likely the reason for the crumbliness. Allow it to rise to about 3.75x to 4x. The exact amount seems somewhat dependent on the exact amount of water. I've been finding that the dough is the right stiffness with slightly under half the volume of water as flour. So for one cup of flour, I'd expect the dough to need just slightly less than 1/2 cup of water. I don't even have a pan as large as what you have used, so I can't give an exact measure for the water. It does take a bit of practice to get the amount right, but that's another good reason to try with the 1/2 cup of flour before attempting a full loaf. Once you know how the dough looks/feels with the right amount of water, you'll probably do better with the full loaf.

If you want the bread to rise higher than the top of the pan, I can only guess at the best method, as it's something I haven't tried. Perhaps a second pan, placed inverted over the other. But anything which allows air flow is going to lead to the dough drying out somewhat. Whatever you use needs to meet up with the edge of the pan all the way around. With the small dish, I've had good results with either a flat piece of foil, resting on the rim, or a small saucer, inverted over the top, like a cover. Either of these allows removal without disturbing the dough when it is time to bake.

I will also suggest rising only in the warm oven, so the pan doesn't have to be disturbed when it's ready to bake. Otherwise the dough may fall, since it will be very delicate at full hight.

I once had the saucer slip out of my fingers when I went to lift it out. It bumped against the dish, and the dough immediately fell. So the dough really is delicate at that stage.

As for the flavor, yes, I do like the addition of caraway and onion. If you like the flavor of rye bread, then you'll probably like that in this bread too.

Yes, the top does remain a bit ghostly, doesn't it?! I have been experimenting with ways to get it to brown more, and will post when I have found a good method. I'm trying to find a way to do it without soy flour, given the many on this board who need/want to avoid that. I have found amaranth to help with browning, but I don't have any to try yet (might get some soon). However, amaranth does tend to retain moisture, so I'm not sure how it will do on that. Since this recipe seems relatively tolerant of extra water (the bread will be soft, but usually not soggy, and may not hold full height), the amaranth may work out.

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I've been experimenting with increasing the protein content, so as to get better browning. I've found that the sorghum can be replaced with buckwheat flour (light). Then the teff can be replaced in part or in full with yellow pea flour. It does help with browning, but not by much. What the buckwheat does is give a bit of crispiness to the crust. The "side effect" is that the dough seems to pull away from the sides more, thus the top turns out more rounded or dome-shaped. It also does seem to be able to rise a bit higher too, though I've not pushed it to see just how much higher it can go. One additional point of interest is that if the teff is replaced entirely with pea flour, then none of the flours would be from actual grains, making it a grain-free recipe (buckwheat is a seed, not a grain). That could be nice for those who are grain-intolerant.

For whatever reason, I haven't had the bread rise as high with both pea flour and sorghum at the same time.

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I'm so glad to see the experimentation going on with this bread. I ordered my flours, etc. a week ago today and Barry Farm just shipped it today (priority mail) so hopefully I get it this weekend so I can play around with it. I'll definitely experiment with the 1/2 cup size. I only ordered a lb. of each.

If you can tolerate dairy, would it work to lightly brush the top of the bun with butter prior to letting it rise to get a browner crust?

Also, have you ever tried adding sunflower and flax seeds to the bun before baking (maybe a tsp. of each)? I'm thinking of a bread I bought made by The Grainless Baker that I really like and I think it's because of the addition of seeds. Of course, it was frozen since I live in Small Town, USA.

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That is interesting. I actually HAVE some yellow pea flour. Also some black bean flour. I didn't know why I got them, just thought they sounded interesting. I'll be waiting to see what you come up with!

I think I should try a smaller pan and a scaled down recipe. I like the sandwich pan because the sides are at a right angle to the bottom, they don't angle outward like most other pans. I guess it doesn't matter much though. I would like larger slices of bread, too! Meanwhile, I'm the only one here who is going to eat this loaf. I think I better freeze some of it. I hope it freezes well!

I did find this recipe that uses yellow pea flour. I need to make it oil and egg free though, so don't know if that will be successful. http://2bglutenfree.blogspot.com/2009/08/no-fail-gluten-free-bread.html Of course, it has tapioca and potato starch in it, but that's the only gluten free bread recipe that calls for yellow pea flour that I've found so far.

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RiceGuy - do you answer dumb questions for free? 'Cause I have one.

Say I wanted to try this recipe with xanthan gum, just for fun. I don't know enough about gluten free flours and baking yet to know what the differences are. But, someone here has mentioned that this bread has a feeling like slimey jelly in their mouth, and they don't like it. This doesn't happen with the xanthan gum bread. Would this be caused by the guar gum? I know that can get slimey feeling. Did I use too much of it, perhaps?

Anyway, I was thinking of trying it with xanthan and see how that is, but wanted to ask you first.

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RiceGuy - do you answer dumb questions for free? 'Cause I have one.

Say I wanted to try this recipe with xanthan gum, just for fun. I don't know enough about gluten free flours and baking yet to know what the differences are. But, someone here has mentioned that this bread has a feeling like slimey jelly in their mouth, and they don't like it. This doesn't happen with the xanthan gum bread. Would this be caused by the guar gum? I know that can get slimey feeling. Did I use too much of it, perhaps?

Anyway, I was thinking of trying it with xanthan and see how that is, but wanted to ask you first.

My apologies for the late reply.

If the bread turned out like slimy jelly, then it sounds like either there was too much guar gum, or too much water. I find this bread has a nice mouth feel. It has what food designers call "tooth". That is, it has a pretty good chewiness to it, and tears off in a satisfying way. I suppose the amount of psyllium may also have been too much. Not sure how much the basic recipe can be multiplied before it starts to change the texture.

Using xanthan (and I have tried this), the bread doesn't rise nearly as much, and is therefore comparatively dense. Only by adding a lot more water does is rise more, but then the texture ends up too soggy/gummy, and more like cake.

Try the 1/2 cup size, if you have a small oven-safe dish. Make the dough stiff, like semi-soft cream cheese. Again, I find the amount of water is a bit less than half the amount of flour. Once you get good results with the small size, you'll know what the dough should be like, and will be much better able to get decent results from an entire loaf.

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I find the amount of water is a bit less than half the amount of flour. Once you get good results with the small size, you'll know what the dough should be like, and will be much better able to get decent results from an entire loaf.

Less than half the amount of flour. Aha. That might be part of the problem. I think I measured out 2 cups of water and used it all. I had 4 cups total flours.

My son and I had sandwiches made from this bread when it was on it's third day, and I thought it was fine. I noticed that it crumbled a bit but other than that it was good and satisfying.

Since I last posted, we got test results back and found out that our son needs to be avoiding corn, eggs, peanuts, soy and many other things. This bread should work for us and I'm pretty happy that you posted this, I was ready to give up on gluten free bread because of the eggs and butter or oil involved.

Now I'm off to find a good mayo substitute to use on sandwiches. No more mayo because of eggs, it used to be Miracle Whip but had to give that up because of the gluten. Sigh.

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I've been experimenting with increasing the protein content, so as to get better browning.

Adding Milk powder to your mix gives body to the bread and color to the crust.

Here's some tips in making bread. (not that you need them) :P

http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--1100/bread-baking-guide.asp

Best Regards,

David

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Adding Milk powder to your mix gives body to the bread and color to the crust.

Perhaps, but I and others can't do dairy. I suppose it's the casein or the lactose which does it. But I've been making some progress, and will be posting about it once I get enough figured out.

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