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Kimbalou

Neuropathy In My Feet Scares Me!

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I noticed I had neuropathy in my feet before my Celiac diagnosis. Yesterday it was really bad. I had tingling and sharp shooting pains in my toes. I read online that anti-depressants can help with the pain. I had no idea. What do you do for neuropathy? I am going to see my dr. soon about this. I don't like how it feels...and it makes me feel OLD. I also have varicose veins...I've had some of them stripped many years ago. My circulation sucks. I wear support hose at work...fun times. ugh.

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I noticed I had neuropathy in my feet before my Celiac diagnosis. Yesterday it was really bad. I had tingling and sharp shooting pains in my toes. I read online that anti-depressants can help with the pain. I had no idea. What do you do for neuropathy? I am going to see my dr. soon about this. I don't like how it feels...and it makes me feel OLD. I also have varicose veins...I've had some of them stripped many years ago. My circulation sucks. I wear support hose at work...fun times. ugh.

#1 on your list should be to get your B12 levels checked. a B12 deficiency leads to peripheal neuropathy. and you dont have to be below range- my sis in law was only in the 200s and was suffering from this. Always make sure you get a copy of your results so you can learn about the ranges and your results- many times doctors miss something. good luck

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You also need a super-careful diet. Folks with neuro problems are more sensitive to gluten than most.

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Q. what do you do for neuropathy?

A. eat a gluten free diet.

I have the feeling back in my feet now after years of numbness. The only bad news is that my feet are not exactly the feet one would want to have anyway :lol: and now I can feel them.

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You also need a super-careful diet. Folks with neuro problems are more sensitive to gluten than most.

Unfortunately what Skylark suggests seems to be true--certainly it is the case for me. I am a true "canary".

I tend to be low on B-1, not B-12. But taking a B complex is good in either case since it helps keep a better balance--B vitamins are essential for a heathy nervous system. And unfortunately having celiac or severe gluten intolerance makes absorbing B vitamins often difficult (as well as calcium and other minerals by the way).

I have found taking co-enzyme B vitamins helps me absorb the vitamins more effectively than otherwise. I take country life capsules since I can't handle the sublingual vitamins with their sorbitol and flavoring. I had taken B vitamins for years, but they just didn't do the same job that the co-enzyme variety does.

I have recently discovered that I am salicylic acid sensitive; this sensitivity has given the nerve problems in the feet and legs an extra special special twist--like it was driving me nuts trying to sleep at night and twitching and jerking all night long almost every night until someone here pointed out I might also have salicylic acid sensitivity. Salicylic acid is not only in aspirin; it is in all kinds of fruits and vegetables as well as herbs. I now eat a low salicylic acid (SA) diet, which has greatly reduced the nerve problem in my legs and feet I have especially at night--along with significantly reducing the swelling scabby itchy eczema in my ears and nethers.

I also find it helps to do yoga and go for long walks almost daily. Nevertheless, I still often have to take benedryl to help me sleep at night. It works safely without the side effects of an antidepressant.

I might be worse than some with this problem due to the fact that in 2006 (before I was completely 100 % gluten free) the myelin sheath on my nerves was down by 50%. I started a complete gluten-free experience and diet in November of 2007, and feel I have improved significantly since. The co-enzyme B vitamins by themselves however had already calmed down my nervous, rattling heart that tended to race in the middle of the night or whenever I exerted myself. It also greatly reduced unexplained anxiety I was experiencing from time to time. Going completely gluten-free fortunately got rid of the anxiety. Itonly seems to come back when I have been glutened (along with the migraines, intestinal distress etc.).

Another thing that helps is to take a hot bath with epsom salts in it, or alternatively, baking soda--it is very relaxing and excellent for the nerves.

I also brush my teeth with baking soda. Baking soda actually is an antidote for salicylic acid poisoning and thus is very balancing for someone with SA.

Baking soda is also helpful against radiation poisoning we are all experiencing from the Fukishima disaster--since it helps us get rid of the cesium that is in a lot of our vegetables right now. I think the fact my family lived so close to the Hanford Nuclear plant up in Washington when they did the Green Run experimental release of radioactive materials into the atmosphere did not help my nerves any, or my tolerance to gluten. I have learned a few things since then, however, that makes life a lot easier. I hope this post is helpful to you and that you soon get to the bottom of your neuropathic problems and start to feel better soon.

Bea

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I do take extra vitamin B12. My levels don't show as low but my Endo. wants me on more. Another Endo. told me to take Evening Primrose Oil, 2,000 mg each morning and night. That really seems to help. Some people find that Alpha Lipoic Acid helps. I take that too. Not sure if it helps.

I tried the antidepressants. They give you a really low dose. They did not help me at all. Just gave me all kinds of side effects. Lyrical is supposed to help too, but the people I know that takes it says it makes them high. This is not how I want to feel. And you are not supposed to drive or operate machinery when you take it. I wouldn't try it.

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