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lucky97

Alcohol...why The Issue Now?

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Hi,

I was diagnosed a little over a year ago, and have been gluten free (to the best of my knowledge) since November 2010.

I still test slightly positive for Celiac (transglutaminase IgA is 21, where a weak positive is 20-30). I'm going to see a nutritionist this week to comb through my diet but I only eat things that are labeled gluten free. That part is getting really OLD because now I don't know where I'm getting gluten.

The gastroenterology specialist also says my blood work is "slightly abnormal" and has cut out alcohol from my diet for the next 4-6 months. I only drink hard ciders, and only a few a week. My primary care doctor (who is NOT the gastroenterology specialist who diagnosed and is treating the Celiac) said actually he would consider the blood work normal but also advises removing alcohol as a variable until, I guess, my blood work is spot-on.

Why would my body now "tolerate" alcohol less or maybe even not at all now with the Celiac? I don't get it, and yes sometimes Celiac is taking all the fun out of things.

Are they steering me away from alcohol (and not the types of drinks, I know what Celiacs can and cannot have as far as gluten-containing) because of this higher risk factors for the lymphomas and whatnot? I should stress that the specialist hasn't mentioned anything like that at all, and is just going to repeat the blood work in four months for the next follow-up.

I am getting frustrated with the whole thing I guess. After getting Celiac, what lightning bolt hits the body so as to react poorly to alcohol itself?

Thanks.

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The gastroenterology specialist also says my blood work is "slightly abnormal" and has cut out alcohol from my diet for the next 4-6 months. I only drink hard ciders, and only a few a week. My primary care doctor (who is NOT the gastroenterology specialist who diagnosed and is treating the Celiac) said actually he would consider the blood work normal but also advises removing alcohol as a variable until, I guess, my blood work is spot-on.

Without knowing what blood test it was that was slightly abnormal it can't be said for sure, but celiac can impact the liver which would show up in an abnormal liver panel. If that was the case alcohol would be something they would tell you to abstain from for a bit. You might want to ask your doctor for a copy of the lab results. There are some folks that are good at helping others understand them.

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I agree. You need to find out what bloodwork was abnormal and why he is concerned.

Someone on the board figured out their loss of alcohol tolerance on a gluten-free diet was molybdenum deficiency. Apparently it's lower in a gluten-free diet because there is a lot in wheat. You might do a little reading on molybdenum-rich foods.

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When I mentioned to my doc yesterday that I enjoy 1 vodka drink per week he was...appalled. Keep in mind that I am quite sick and have a long way to go healing-wise. But he told me to cut it out 100%, that he believes it contributes to leaky gut. Doesnt even want me to take a sip of my hubby's wine! He said when I'm healthy I could consider a regular drink (not what he'd advise though, he views alcohol as a poison to our systems).

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Alcohol not only deletes the body of certain vitamins and in a body that is in need of vits this is crucial. Also it messes with the flora in the gut. We know to stay away from acidic foods when our system is in ned of repair and alcohol is as destructive.

http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh21-1/76.pdf

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Alcohol not only deletes the body of certain vitamins and in a body that is in need of vits this is crucial. Also it messes with the flora in the gut. We know to stay away from acidic foods when our system is in ned of repair and alcohol is as destructive.

http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh21-1/76.pdf

Very interesting. Thank you for posting that.

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Alcohol not only deletes the body of certain vitamins and in a body that is in need of vits this is crucial. Also it messes with the flora in the gut. We know to stay away from acidic foods when our system is in ned of repair and alcohol is as destructive.

How did you make the jump from alcohol to acidic foods? Probiotic acidic foods like yogurt or unpasteurized sauerkraut juice can be very healing.

There also isn't a single statement in that article you linked that suggests that one drink of vodka a week is an issue. I also disagree with your implication that one drink a week would mess up gut flora. The animal study on gut dysbiosis everyone cites was on daily consumption of alcohol for ten weeks. There were no changes partway into the study either. It took the full ten weeks.

There just isn't any evidence that one drink a week is going to ruin someone's recovery (as long as it's not beer). You have to maintain some perspective. A breakfast of some home fried potatoes, an egg, half a banana, and a glass of orange juice will more than replace what it takes to metabolize a drink.

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I'm just saying what my doc said to me. Can't post studies to back it up because I only have his opinion. Which I value because he has helped me more than any other doc out there and has already made a huge improvement in my health. So if he says he thinks it's a bad idea for me in my current state to have a weekly drink, I am just going to go with it, as his judgment thus far has been excellent.

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By the way, the article posted above does state "...alcohol

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The article's focus was on CHRONIC alcohol abuse (i.e. alcoholics)and does not seem applicable to a once- a- week glass of alcohol.

Like anything else, moderation is the key.

If you are newly DXed and your gut is bothering you, lay off the alcohol for a while. (I had to myself--my GI tract was in flames :blink: )

Like anything else, common sense rules. ;)

To the OP--why not ask your doctor WHY he recommended it? It's a good question. :)

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Well thanks for all the quick replies...

As far as my blood work (which is extensive every four months) I do remember my WBC was 3.74 (low normal--but that's up from before), my platelets were at 149 (150 is low normal) and, the only other thing I remember seeing was the mono% was I think at 14 (13 is high normal). That and the IgA at 21 (under 20 would indicate my diet is gluten free) are the only things I noticed.

I stopped google-ing those things in isolation, which only led to some scary diseases and I don't know what I'm looking at anyway.

However, I feel fine. In fact I'm no longer anemic for the first time in 16 months, and he said all my vitamin levels are good, thyroid, all of that. Plus I have more energy now than I've had in over a year.

Sooooo maybe it's the molybdenum-rich foods thing I need to look into and of course I don't have a problem with no alcohol for several months but I do miss the occasional drink with friends, that's all.

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Very interesting. The article is a summation of 10 years research on the affects of alcohol, and cites various studies done over that time. Some of the negative affects listed were not particular to alcoholics, but one time consumption affects. It didn't say anything about those possible one time affects causing irreparable damage though.

I think one good way to tell if it is having a negative affect is to stop it for a few months. Just like we would do with any food that we are trying to determine reactions to.

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How did you make the jump from alcohol to acidic foods? Probiotic acidic foods like yogurt or unpasteurized sauerkraut juice can be very healing.

There also isn't a single statement in that article you linked that suggests that one drink of vodka a week is an issue. I also disagree with your implication that one drink a week would mess up gut flora. The animal study on gut dysbiosis everyone cites was on daily consumption of alcohol for ten weeks. There were no changes partway into the study either. It took the full ten weeks.

There just isn't any evidence that one drink a week is going to ruin someone's recovery (as long as it's not beer). You have to maintain some perspective. A breakfast of some home fried potatoes, an egg, half a banana, and a glass of orange juice will more than replace what it takes to metabolize a drink.

I should have explained myself a bit better. Acidic foods have the same ability to start burning the lining of the esophagus and everything all the way thru to the end and alcohol does the same thing. Many of us who have had problems with acid reflux know to stay away from acidic foods but we don't always see alcohol in the same way. And yes, while articles start that one shot of vodka is fine, this article is actually respresenting people who have gastrointestinal issues, not the general population.

The info was good and if you do not feel applies to you, or you disagree, no harm done. I have been effected by alcohol consumption since my system has been attacked by wheat and if that is not your case, great! All I am trying to do is help oithers who are dealing with my same issues and I found the article very informative.

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Sorry, I get fed up by the American puritanism that often condemns one or two drinks a week. Doctors are infected by it as readily and irrationally as anyone else. Sometimes they lose perspective that restricting something like alcohol 100% can create stress that is even worse for healing than the occasional drink was. We already have stressful diets!

The devastating effects of alcoholism, or even of having two or three drinks rather than one on sensitive stomachs are pretty well known. I doubt we're talking about that much alcohol though.

I don't know what made Lucky97's doctor nervous, but Aly1's doctor just sounds inflexible.

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He does have a strong opinion but I dunno, he has a patient sitting in front of him who's pretty messed up for her age, who he believes if we make some changes will be able to get out of her wheelchair and resume a normal healthy life...his way of getting her there is to create as pure an internal environment as he can. Pure foods in, good supplements, the body begins to heal itself. Surely no one here is trying to argue that alcohol is healthful (other than as a stress reliever, which if course has some value if really needed, which is not the case for me)?

Please keep in mind the context of this doc's opinion is important: I am *only* talking in the context of a really sick person - not your everyday person (or celiac) who is stable in their health, there's a big difference. I know in the context of this forum you will read that his opinion on alcohol is about celiacs and alcohol but it's not - he is NOT a celiac dr - he is an internist who specializes in medical mysteries. His patients are people who all check out as "healthy" in mainstream medical testing but who are terribly ill nonetheless. They come to him when modern medicine fails them. So, derive from that that a lot of them are people who are very sensitive and get sick from things in their diet or environment that would not harm the average everyday person. In that context I don't think he's being over the top - he's advising a course of conservative lifestyle to give the body a chance to heal, while the person figures out what things are making them sick in the first place. And as I said before, 10 years of being told by docs they can't find anything wrong with me to put me in a wheelchair, but there I was, and very weak and ill too - he's the only doc that said "I think I can help you" and HAS. Where would I be in my healing if I'd ignored his advice to go gluten free?? (I was convinced that would not have much impact on my health. Good thing I put him in the driver's seat!!) Because of that, his opinion wins in my book. I don't have to like it. :)

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He does have a strong opinion but I dunno, he has a patient sitting in front of him who's pretty messed up for her age, who he believes if we make some changes will be able to get out of her wheelchair and resume a normal healthy life...his way of getting her there is to create as pure an internal environment as he can. Pure foods in, good supplements, the body begins to heal itself. Surely no one here is trying to argue that alcohol is healthful (other than as a stress reliever, which if course has some value if really needed, which is not the case for me)?

Please keep in mind the context of this doc's opinion is important: I am *only* talking in the context of a really sick person - not your everyday person (or celiac) who is stable in their health, there's a big difference. I know in the context of this forum you will read that his opinion on alcohol is about celiacs and alcohol but it's not - he is NOT a celiac dr - he is an internist who specializes in medical mysteries. His patients are people who all check out as "healthy" in mainstream medical testing but who are terribly ill nonetheless. They come to him when modern medicine fails them. So, derive from that that a lot of them are people who are very sensitive and get sick from things in their diet or environment that would not harm the average everyday person. In that context I don't think he's being over the top - he's advising a course of conservative lifestyle to give the body a chance to heal, while the person figures out what things are making them sick in the first place. And as I said before, 10 years of being told by docs they can't find anything wrong with me to put me in a wheelchair, but there I was, and very weak and ill too - he's the only doc that said "I think I can help you" and HAS. Where would I be in my healing if I'd ignored his advice to go gluten free?? (I was convinced that would not have much impact on my health. Good thing I put him in the driver's seat!!) Because of that, his opinion wins in my book. I don't have to like it. :)

I think you are wise to follow your doctor's advice. If you are still very ill alcohol is something that you can certainly live without. I hope you are soon feeling better. The occasional drink will still be there when you are.

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He does have a strong opinion but I dunno, he has a patient sitting in front of him who's pretty messed up for her age, who he believes if we make some changes will be able to get out of her wheelchair and resume a normal healthy life...his way of getting her there is to create as pure an internal environment as he can. Pure foods in, good supplements, the body begins to heal itself. Surely no one here is trying to argue that alcohol is healthful (other than as a stress reliever, which if course has some value if really needed, which is not the case for me)?

Please keep in mind the context of this doc's opinion is important: I am *only* talking in the context of a really sick person - not your everyday person (or celiac) who is stable in their health, there's a big difference. I know in the context of this forum you will read that his opinion on alcohol is about celiacs and alcohol but it's not - he is NOT a celiac dr - he is an internist who specializes in medical mysteries. His patients are people who all check out as "healthy" in mainstream medical testing but who are terribly ill nonetheless. They come to him when modern medicine fails them. So, derive from that that a lot of them are people who are very sensitive and get sick from things in their diet or environment that would not harm the average everyday person. In that context I don't think he's being over the top - he's advising a course of conservative lifestyle to give the body a chance to heal, while the person figures out what things are making them sick in the first place. And as I said before, 10 years of being told by docs they can't find anything wrong with me to put me in a wheelchair, but there I was, and very weak and ill too - he's the only doc that said "I think I can help you" and HAS. Where would I be in my healing if I'd ignored his advice to go gluten free?? (I was convinced that would not have much impact on my health. Good thing I put him in the driver's seat!!) Because of that, his opinion wins in my book. I don't have to like it. :)

Wow, sounds like you have a rare bird of a doctor! I wish everyone on this forum had access to someone so talented.

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Hi

I have been gluten free for a month and no longer crave alcohol. They say you crave what you are allergic to. To me it was beer and toast! I had one drink last night I got a allergic respons and felt sleepy maybe my tolerance has lessened. I could never tolerate it anyway three beers and I was a clown! Good luck.

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Which I value because he has helped me more than any other doc out there and has already made a huge improvement in my health.

If it works for you, that's really the only thing that matters. Study results are really only relevant to the average person. We're all well above average here. :)

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Hi

I have been gluten free for a month and no longer crave alcohol. They say you crave what you are allergic to. To me it was beer and toast! I had one drink last night I got a allergic respons and felt sleepy maybe my tolerance has lessened. I could never tolerate it anyway three beers and I was a clown! Good luck.

BarryC, uh, maybe you already know this but there's no more beer if you have Celiac (you said you had one drink and had an allergic response--don't know if it was beer). There are other gluten-free drinks but not beer (unless it's a gluten free beer, not impossible but not easy to find). If your one drink was beer you are priming yourself for serious health consequences at some point as your intestines are damaged by the gluten (in beer).

Again, sorry if you already know all of this.

Trust me, I was a beer man myself from the word go...until Celiac came to town!

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I'm just saying what my doc said to me. Can't post studies to back it up because I only have his opinion. Which I value because he has helped me more than any other doc out there and has already made a huge improvement in my health. So if he says he thinks it's a bad idea for me in my current state to have a weekly drink, I am just going to go with it, as his judgment thus far has been excellent.

Good for you Aly! I was the girl in my 20's out on the dance floor til 2 a.m. and always loved a party never a heavy drinker but loved my glass of wine with cheese and olives while preparing dinner. When I got real sick though back in Feb, if I would drink any alcohol it felt like it went directly to my bloodstream. I found I was extremely sensitive and I could not understand. If I had a glass of wine I would be just a slight bit off-balance the next day. I did some research online and what I was reading abiout my symptoms fell inline with that of alcoholism but there was no way. One glass a wine a night would not even be considered as alcoholism and yet my body was not tolerating it.

Near as I could figure it had to do with the damaged villa and so when I saw this article I absolutely identified. I wasn't focusing on the parts where they talked about alcoholism but rather the parts where they were tlaking about patients with gastro issues and it makes sense. I know I had alot of foods I could not eat when my system was so damaged, antyhing acidic was out of the question. There may be other benefits in these foods just as there are other benefits in wine but if they are doing damage to the system, the damage out-weighs the benefits.

I am 9 months into my gluten-free diet and I do go out once a week with friends and have a drink with my meal. Even at that I worry as I am still noticing I am being effected by the alcohol. Not as much as before. Last thing I want to do is damage my liver. I have had 2 family members die from alcoholism and I have another that should be gone, and I do not know how she is still living. That's my mom. She has been treated for canncer cells in her stomach. She has had holes burned in her esophagus and takes daily antiacid. She smokes on top of it and I quite honestly do not know why she isn't displaying more damage than she is.

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Some of us find that we seem to react to the tiny amount of gluten allowed in gluten free foods. We call ourselves super sensitive celiacs. We do better on a whole foods diet. You may be in this category. It is healthier to eat that way anyway. That might be why you have the positive blood work. Which hard cider are you drinking? Is it made in a mixed facility?

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I guess I'm lucky as I've not experienced any difficulties with either wine, malt whisky or Glayva :D .

I've had my liver function done twice as I'm on statins for familial hypercholesterolemis and it's fine. Both my GP and my GI are aware that I have a glass of wine every night with my dinner and at the weekends I also have either a malt or a glayva after dinner. Both have told me that there is no reason to make any changes to my alcohol copnsumption. It appears that this is another area where people have different levels of sensitivity.

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Hi,

I was diagnosed a little over a year ago, and have been gluten free (to the best of my knowledge) since November 2010.

I still test slightly positive for Celiac (transglutaminase IgA is 21, where a weak positive is 20-30). I'm going to see a nutritionist this week to comb through my diet but I only eat things that are labeled gluten free. That part is getting really OLD because now I don't know where I'm getting gluten.

The gastroenterology specialist also says my blood work is "slightly abnormal" and has cut out alcohol from my diet for the next 4-6 months. I only drink hard ciders, and only a few a week. My primary care doctor (who is NOT the gastroenterology specialist who diagnosed and is treating the Celiac) said actually he would consider the blood work normal but also advises removing alcohol as a variable until, I guess, my blood work is spot-on.

Why would my body now "tolerate" alcohol less or maybe even not at all now with the Celiac? I don't get it, and yes sometimes Celiac is taking all the fun out of things.

Are they steering me away from alcohol (and not the types of drinks, I know what Celiacs can and cannot have as far as gluten-containing) because of this higher risk factors for the lymphomas and whatnot? I should stress that the specialist hasn't mentioned anything like that at all, and is just going to repeat the blood work in four months for the next follow-up.

I am getting frustrated with the whole thing I guess. After getting Celiac, what lightning bolt hits the body so as to react poorly to alcohol itself?

Thanks.

Are you drinking hard ciders that are specifically labeled gluten free? Maybe that could be the problem.

I love drinking hard cider, as I miss beer very much...along with crunchy food (which I am finding more of though).

Aly1 - If you were drinking vodka. I know I never never get D, even pre-gluten free. I had my first vodka since being gluten free within 2 hours I spent the rest of the day in the bathroom with D. I know everything affects everyone different, but I used to drink vodka a lot, I was kind of shocked by that reaction. I definitly think some brands no matter how they are distilled must still have gluten. I emailed the company too, they claim all their flavors are gluten free because of the distilling process.

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Are you drinking hard ciders that are specifically labeled gluten free? Maybe that could be the problem.

I love drinking hard cider, as I miss beer very much...along with crunchy food (which I am finding more of though).

Aly1 - If you were drinking vodka. I know I never never get D, even pre-gluten free. I had my first vodka since being gluten free within 2 hours I spent the rest of the day in the bathroom with D. I know everything affects everyone different, but I used to drink vodka a lot, I was kind of shocked by that reaction. I definitly think some brands no matter how they are distilled must still have gluten. I emailed the company too, they claim all their flavors are gluten free because of the distilling process.

I am one who doesn't tolerate distilled gluten. Next time you want to try a vodka drink go for the potato vodka. You may be able to tolerate those just fine.

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