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GFreeMO

So Delicious Coconut Milk

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However, like many of the members here, when a food doesn't agree with me, the reaction can be similar to my reaction to gluten. But over time I've learned to discern the differences, thus I'm usually (though not always) pretty sure when it's gluten and when it's something else. For the times when I'm not sure, testing a few different brands of the same product, different products with a common suspect ingredient, and so forth, has always been quite useful in narrowing it down. It can take time, patience, and a few days (or weeks) of not feeling so well, but it can be very enlightening. IMHO, better to know an offender and avoid it, rather than get surprised now and then by some darn ingredient/food, and not truly get the bottom of it.

I agree completely, Riceguy and this is what I believe many of us are trying to reinforce to the OP and to any others who read this forum.

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Or, was your comment about the numerous studies an opinion rather than a fact?

Is it not common knowledge--supported by medical evidence, follow -up testing and symptom -resolution--that celiacs recover from villous damage?

I am not talking about refractory sprue here.

Do you really want all those medical abstracts cited? :blink:

Do you think those celiacs who are in remission are using some of those certified gluten-free products in their diets?

I humbly suggest...of course they are!

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Is it not common knowledge--supported by medical evidence, follow -up testing and symptom -resolution--that celiacs recover from villous damage?

I am not talking about refractory sprue here.

Do you really want all those medical abstracts cited? :blink:

Do you think those celiacs who are in remission are using some of those certified gluten-free products in their diets?

Of course they are!

There's at least one article on Celiac.com about how the intestines of most people with Celiac Disease do not fully recover, even after five years of strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. And, that these same individuals ordinarily do not experience any symptoms. Being symptom-free doesn't mean a full recovery has been achieved.

I think this is the first thread on the board I've seen in which Celiac is referred to as being "in remission". Not so sure I like such use of the phrase. I mean, celiac disease never really goes away. Nothing has changed beyond the healing, and even that I doubt is ever complete. It is however, just as fragile (if not more so), and the inevitable periodic exposure to gluten brings on symptoms as well as damage to the body, be it intestinal or otherwise.

A bunch of searches did not turn up the specific article I referred to, though admin did post a link to it on the board. Here's one which I think many will find interesting though: https://www.celiac.com/articles/21482/1/Latent-Celiac-Disease-Afflicts-Many-Who-Tolerate-Gluten/Page1.html

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There's at least one article on Celiac.com about how the intestines of most people with Celiac Disease do not fully recover, even after five years of strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. And, that these same individuals ordinarily do not experience any symptoms. Being symptom-free doesn't mean a full recovery has been achieved.

I think this is the first thread on the board I've seen in which Celiac is referred to as being "in remission". Not so sure I like such use of the phrase. I mean, celiac disease never really goes away. Nothing has changed beyond the healing, and even that I doubt is ever complete. It is however, just as fragile (if not more so), and the inevitable periodic exposure to gluten brings on symptoms as well as damage to the body, be it intestinal or otherwise.

A bunch of searches did not turn up the specific article I referred to, though admin did post a link to it on the board. Here's one which I think many will find interesting though: https://www.celiac.com/articles/21482/1/Latent-Celiac-Disease-Afflicts-Many-Who-Tolerate-Gluten/Page1.html

I'm sorry, but I never used the word cure, I used the word remission, as my doctor does. I am fully aware that it does not go away, as is the case of all autoimmune disease. It is treatable, and symptoms go into remission.

Remission (in medicine), means the state of absence of disease activity in patients with a chronic illness, with the possibility of return of disease activity.

That's how I used the word.

So, yes, gluten exposure will spark the inflammation, but it does not mean symptom abatement does not occur.

Many healthy celiacs are living proof.

I know some people have refractory sprue and I know some people never fully heal their intestines (especially those who are DXed late in life). I was-- and I hope that is not going to be me.

That was not what I was talking about at all.

"From the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

The Consensus Development Conference in June 2004 issued a Final Statement that reads in part:

The treatment of celiac disease remains a lifelong gluten free diet, which results in remission for most individuals."

That was my use of the word remission as well.

If anyone cares, here is an article that explains WHY some people have Refractory Celiac Disease. There are many reasons, including continued gluten exposure, (implying obvious non-compliance with the diet) but nowhere does it say "from using certified gluten-free products on the market". I would think they would include that if it were a major health hazard. Well, at least I would hope so. :unsure:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16644460

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Hello peeps! :D These posts are interesting, but I fear that they might be lost in a thread about Coconut Milk.

Should those posting choose to continue, perhaps beginning a new thread on the subject would be a good idea. :D

Anyway, I think that the OP has had the query answered waaaay back there. :P

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This is a spirited discussion indeed. :lol:

Not necessarily a bad thing. Lots of intelligent folks on here.

But you are correct--The query was:

Does it bother you? and like all of these queries,

some said no

and some said yes.

Guess she will have to decide what to do with it.

Cheers all,

IH

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Perhaps a moderator can split off these posts which have strayed somewhat off-topic, to a new thread?

For newbies, it's this simple....if you stick with certified gluten-free products and stay away from shared facilities, unless they have a good track record for keeping things separate and clean, you should be fine. If you do react to a new food, it probably is not going to be from gluten but from one of many other reasons mentioned already. You may have to heal a long while before you get to the point where you can eat without getting sick a couple of times a week. This is normal. Continuing problems should be addressed with a doctor you trust. There may be an underlying problem, common to Celiacs. Above all, relax and don't live in fear of minute amounts of gluten out there, otherwise, you'll end up like some of the posters to this forum....overly obsessive about food and life. :blink:

I do have to respond to this, because I DO REACT to certified gluten-free products which have been tested to contain less than 20ppm of gluten. Products from different companies, with a big gluten-free claim on the front, and company statements about how they test and so forth. Even products from dedicated gluten-free facilities. How do I know it wasn't another ingredient? Because the products I'm referring to only have ONE INGREDIENT! I do not buy "processed food". As I've stated in other threads, I've yet to find safe gluten-free buckwheat groats. And only one company I know of makes buckwheat flour I can safely consume. They accomplish this by growing, harvesting, milling and packaging their own buckwheat, in a dedicated facility. For all the other buckwheat products, some packages will be OK, while others cause a severe reaction, of the sort only gluten does to me.

So, just because it's certified gluten-free doesn't mean it's safe for every Celiac. I'm not "overly obsessive", as I'd be in constant agony if I didn't take the precautions I now take. For those who don't have to be super careful, I'd say consider yourself fortunate. Wish I was there.

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Perhaps a moderator can split off these posts which have strayed somewhat off-topic, to a new thread?

I do have to respond to this, because I DO REACT to certified gluten-free products which have been tested to contain less than 20ppm of gluten. Products from different companies, with a big gluten-free claim on the front, and company statements about how they test and so forth. Even products from dedicated gluten-free facilities. How do I know it wasn't another ingredient? Because the products I'm referring to only have ONE INGREDIENT! I do not buy "processed food". As I've stated in other threads, I've yet to find safe gluten-free buckwheat groats. And only one company I know of makes buckwheat flour I can safely consume. They accomplish this by growing, harvesting, milling and packaging their own buckwheat, in a dedicated facility. For all the other buckwheat products, some packages will be OK, while others cause a severe reaction, of the sort only gluten does to me.

So, just because it's certified gluten-free doesn't mean it's safe for every Celiac. I'm not "overly obsessive", as I'd be in constant agony if I didn't take the precautions I now take. For those who don't have to be super careful, I'd say consider yourself fortunate. Wish I was there.

Well stated.

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Perhaps a moderator can split off these posts which have strayed somewhat off-topic, to a new thread?

I do have to respond to this, because I DO REACT to certified gluten-free products which have been tested to contain less than 20ppm of gluten. Products from different companies, with a big gluten-free claim on the front, and company statements about how they test and so forth. Even products from dedicated gluten-free facilities. How do I know it wasn't another ingredient? Because the products I'm referring to only have ONE INGREDIENT! I do not buy "processed food". As I've stated in other threads, I've yet to find safe gluten-free buckwheat groats. And only one company I know of makes buckwheat flour I can safely consume. They accomplish this by growing, harvesting, milling and packaging their own buckwheat, in a dedicated facility. For all the other buckwheat products, some packages will be OK, while others cause a severe reaction, of the sort only gluten does to me.

So, just because it's certified gluten-free doesn't mean it's safe for every Celiac. I'm not "overly obsessive", as I'd be in constant agony if I didn't take the precautions I now take. For those who don't have to be super careful, I'd say consider yourself fortunate. Wish I was there.

Riceguy...who the hell says I am not being super careful? That's a flippant statement to make considering I nearly died from this disease. I can assure you that no one is more careful than I am about what goes into my gut but I have educated myself on the disease extensively so base my statements on reality for the vast majority of Celiacs out there....not those who may have underlying conditions or other food allergies that may contribute to a reaction. It's easy to say that you are 100% sure it was gluten because I have been there. Only it wasn't gluten...it was a dairy reaction, which is now nicely controlled.

As far as finding safe grains to eat, any Celiac who wants to consume them should only buy from dedicated companies, if you really want to be safe from a hit. I do the same thing as you and don't randomly buy anything and not put some thought into it. This isn't a contest to see who is the worse Celiac, which certain people seem to think.

I will say it again for those who have difficulty in understanding things...if certified gluten-free food were that contaminated with gluten, no one would heal. Celiacs the world over would still be having issues. There are many Celiacs who do extremely well with the gluten-free diet which contains some safe processed foods. I am one of them because I understand the disease process and did what I had to do to heal, without being overly worried about whether this would happen or not. If you want to continue to believe that most of what's offered out there isn't safe, then don't eat it. But do not perpetuate this fantasy that all processed gluten-free food is contaminated with gluten and you cannot heal if you eat it. The gluten-free food industry is growing by leaps and bounds, which is great for us, and it wouldn't be if everyone got sick from what they produce.

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All of this from a simple question. I guess that next time I have a question about a specific product meant for super sensitives to answer I will send PM's. I thought that this section of the forum was to discuss things with other super sensitives.

I really did not mean to start a big debate. I just wanted to know if the coconut milk was along the same lines as the "gluten free" Rice Dream beverage.

I am super sensitive and avoid most processed foods. I just need a "milk" for baking and am allergic to nuts so I thought that I would give this a try.

Thanks to those that actually answered my question.

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It is a section for super sensitives to discuss things.

And those of us who are super sensitive to lower levels of gluten

answered you. Honestly.

We just have differences of opinions about it :)

Hopefully, you can find what you need to fit your milk needs.

Best wishes, IH

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It is a section for super sensitives to discuss things.

And those of us who are super sensitive to levels of gluten

answered you.

We just have differences of opinions about it :)

Hopefully, you can find what you need to fit your milk needs.

Best wishes, IH

Thanks! I guess I'll give it a whirl and if I have some sort of reaction to it, i'll go back to the arduous task of making rice milk.

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Thanks! I guess I'll give it a whirl and if I have some sort of reaction to it, i'll go back to the arduous task of making rice milk.

:lol: I know what you mean.

I did make rice milk once and it was a relatively easy recipe, but because you have to make such a big batch for all that prep to be worth it, I did not get through both bottles I produced fast enough- and it went rancid pretty fast. :(

What a bummer--for all that work! :rolleyes:

Hope you find the coconut milk works for you, because it is tasty, has loads of calcium and works well in recipes.

Take care! :)

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For regular milk production we found investing in a chinois (a fine mesh strainer, used in French cooking, I think) to be really helpful. It made the whole process so much nicer for us.

I found a recipe online that called for adding fat to the rice milk and really thought that added alot. Here is the recipe that we used quite a bit: http://www.veganreader.com/2009/05/17/how-to-make-rice-milk-and-stop-supporting-rice-dream/ . Following those guidelines gave us our best rice milk results. We bottled in Mason jars and found that the milk kept really well for us.

I just looked, and Pacific Natural Foods also makes a rice milk. We have never tried their rice milk, but we have enjoyed their nut milks. And we have been happy with their customer service. There are concerns (a whole thread about that on here) about the introduction of a gluten containing milk, and they do produce a significant amount of nut milks on the same lines. Through following Allergic Girl (Sloane Miller), I was able to find out that there are nut allergic people that are consuming their non-nut milk products without any problems. So, you may want to look at that one as well, and so far we have been pleased with their quality control methods for their milks.

We have also had good luck with "Made in Australia" rice milks. I can give you specific brand names if you want to try and find if any of them are imported where you live. Good luck finding something that works well for you!

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For regular milk production we found investing in a chinois (a fine mesh strainer, used in French cooking, I think) to be really helpful. It made the whole process so much nicer for us.

I found a recipe online that called for adding fat to the rice milk and really thought that added alot. Here is the recipe that we used quite a bit: http://www.veganreader.com/2009/05/17/how-to-make-rice-milk-and-stop-supporting-rice-dream/ . Following those guidelines gave us our best rice milk results. We bottled in Mason jars and found that the milk kept really well for us.

I just looked, and Pacific Natural Foods also makes a rice milk. We have never tried their rice milk, but we have enjoyed their nut milks. And we have been happy with their customer service. There are concerns (a whole thread about that on here) about the introduction of a gluten containing milk, and they do produce a significant amount of nut milks on the same lines. Through following Allergic Girl (Sloane Miller), I was able to find out that there are nut allergic people that are consuming their non-nut milk products without any problems. So, you may want to look at that one as well, and so far we have been pleased with their quality control methods for their milks.

We have also had good luck with "Made in Australia" rice milks. I can give you specific brand names if you want to try and find if any of them are imported where you live. Good luck finding something that works well for you!

I'm curious because I think it might be good to cook with almond or coconut milk but don't really want to drink it - can you freeze it? Would seem like a good idea if you can't use it all before it goes bad?

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I'm curious because I think it might be good to cook with almond or coconut milk but don't really want to drink it - can you freeze it? Would seem like a good idea if you can't use it all before it goes bad?

I had the same question. I don't drink any type of milk, only use it for cooking.

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We never tried freezing it, as we have a family of five consuming the milks. I would love to hear how it goes if anyone tries it. I don't know why it wouldn't work, although you may get some separation. But that seems easy enough to take care of once thawed. Myself and a friend did a lot of baking projects using the nut milks, and the results were fabulous. The rice milk was used primarily as a beverage.

I have heard of people making their own coconut milk using the coconut from Tropical Traditions. We have been off of coconut for a while, so I always forget about that! I bet that would be very yummy too.

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I saw this today and thought it might be worthwhile noting. The article refers to brown rice syrup and products made with it, including gluten-free foods. They say the white rice is not as much of an issues as the arsenic is in the hull and that is removed to get the white rice. Maybe some people are reacting to arsenic in their gluten-free processed foods?

Arsenic in Brown Rice Syrup

Arsenic Found in Brown Rice Syrup, Organic Foods, Baby Formulas

A sweetener used in powdered baby formula and some organic and gluten-free foods may contain dangerously high levels of arsenic, researchers reported today.

Environmental chemist Brian P. Jackson, who is the director of the Trace Element Analysis Core Facility at Dartmouth University, said that his team found organic baby formula whose main ingredient was brown rice syrup had arsenic levels six times higher than what the EPA considers safe for drinking water. According to the study, which was published Thursday in the journal "Environmental Health Perspectives," the researchers also found high arsenic levels in some organic foods sweetened with brown rice syrup, including cereal bars, energy bars, and gel energy "shots" that athletes slurp down after working out.

"The baby formula findings are concerning," Jackson said. The risk of arsenic poisoning from eating a cereal bar or an energy shot once in a while are low, he pointed out, but for babies and for people who are on gluten-free diets, arsenic poisoning could be a concern. ...article continues..

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I just wanted to know if the coconut milk was along the same lines as the "gluten free" Rice Dream beverage.

I can't find mention anywhere of enzymes in coconut milk. So Delicious seems like a scrupulous enough company to mention it and they probably wouldn't pass GFCO certification playing games like that. I think you should be fine with it from that respect. :)

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There are 20 million celiacs in the US

It is always my intention to provide accurate information.

IH

Good thing I re-read THAT post, since it really is my intenton to provide ACCURATE info.

That number should be 2 million

Sorry for the error.

I was having a bad typo day :rolleyes: ...and shame on me for poor proofreading.

Carry on.

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Here is the recipe that we used quite a bit: http://www.veganreader.com/2009/05/17/how-to-make-rice-milk-and-stop-supporting-rice-dream/ . Following those guidelines gave us our best rice milk results. We bottled in Mason jars and found that the milk kept really well for us.

Yes, that's the one I used as well.

It produced a delicious rice milk. (I just did not use it fast enough as I was the only one using it.)

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So Delicious Coconut Milk ice cream is safe. It doesn't contain any gluten. It is high in fat content, but good fat is the same as bad fat when it comes to your intestinal tract. It can act as a laxative and cause cramping. If I eat too much of it, that's exactly what happens. Gluten like reaction minus the gluten.

This got me thinking because I am looking for some high fat foods to put in my diet. The fat content of So Delicious coconut milk is 5 g total fat and 5 g saturated fat/cup. http://www.turtlemountain.com/products/product.php?p=so_delicious_beverage_hg_original

The fat content of whole milk, which I tolerate just fine is 8 g of total fat and 5 g of saturated fat/cup. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/69/2

I didn't look up the ice cream since that isn't what I reacted to.

I doubt that it was the fat content of the coconut milk that bothered me since I tolerate the even greater fat content of whole milk just fine.

I did notice that the fat content of shredded coconut is high: 14.2 g for a 40 g serving so I ordered some from a coconut only facility which I hope that I'll be able to tolerate. Thank you for idea, Gemini.

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