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carrielynn

Does Cd Permanently Stunt Growth?

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BTW, it's fairly common for parents to hold their kids back a year and have them begin kindergarten at age 6. Some of those bigger lunks might be a year older than your son. In our kinder class, there is a segment on "differences". They talk about kids with freckles, glasses, hair color diffs, etc. You might want to ask your teacher if that lesson will be taught at your school and if it will be, maybe she'd consider doing it sooner, rather than later in order to address this issue with your son. I was a teacher. We were all taught to seek out "teaching moments" in order to make the lessons relevant. Very corny, but it works!

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Great pointers. Thanks for going to the trouble to research them. I looked at all of them.

When referring to stunted growth, most of what I read said things like "may stunt growth" or "can stunt growth". None of them said that celiac disease in children WILL PERMANENTLY STUNT growth. So there is definitely a possibility of stunted growth (because of course it makes sense that it could, especially in severe cases and when the disease goes undiagnosed), but it's not set in stone. I pulled out the relevant points from each of these... (see below)

This actually makes me feel a lot better and I can't thank you enough for searching for these.

Carrie

This one -- http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read,1024,3753.html -- said:

"Untreated celiac disease in children can stunt growth and cause lower A1Cs. However, researchers conducting a longitudinal study of children with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease say that following a gluten-free diet can restore normal growth and contribute to even lower A1Cs—and might also mitigate the blood-glucose deterioration commonly present during puberty."

This one -- http://www.sutterhealth.org/health/healthi...gml_id=hw192303

"In some cases, the inability to absorb nutrients (malabsorption) may be severe enough to stunt growth and weaken bones."

This one --http://www.glutino.com/english/interieur/article/view_article.cfm?art_id=67

"In children, celiac disease can stunt growth and even cause behavioral changes that mimic autism. "

This one -- http://health.yahoo.com/ency/healthwise/hw192303/hw192370

"In some cases, the inability to absorb nutrients (malabsorption) may be severe enough to stunt growth and weaken bones."

This one --http://www.universityhealth.org/117457.cfm

In some cases, the inability to absorb nutrients (malabsorption) may be severe enough to stunt growth and weaken bones.

This one:http://www.drkaslow.com/html/gluten-brain_connection_.html

Malabsorption can stunt the stature of children, slow the maturation rate, create an over-sensitive or irritable brain tissue, and perhaps alter the learning styles (sensory perception issues) of these children.

And finally http://www.parents.com/articles/age/5669.jsp

Some children are born with or develop serious medical conditions that can stunt growth if not treated. The most common: gastrointestinal disorders such as celiac disease; food allergies; thyroid problems; hormone deficiency; heart, kidney, or liver ailments; and certain chromosomal abnormalities.

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They say "may" and "can" because there is no proof yet. Cigarette companies got away with the "may cause cancer" wording for decades *they claimed there was no study that proved it*

Not enough research money is devoted to celiac disease. Who wants to spend tons of money researching a disease that is ultimately, self-managed with a gluten free diet? There's no financial incentive to throw tons of money at a disease that isn't going to make a drug company rich. (I know, very jaded) -and I have no proof. Until research PROVES that undx celiac disease in children causes malnutrition severe enough to stunt growth, the wording goes like this...."MAY, CAN, COULD, MIGHT...etc, stunt growth." This is one of these areas of celiac disease that parents need to decide on their own how to interpret. I'm not waiting on some research to prove what makes sense to a layman. Glad to know you read them all! I didn't. :rolleyes:

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Guest taweavmo3

I totally understand your worry, I have the same concerns for my daughter. I am very short myself (4'11") so although I know there are far worse things than being short, it did cause me to get teased quite a bit in school. I actually homeschooled myself the last two years of high school, b/c I hated school so much. Even now, at 30 years old, adults still make cracks about my height.

So, although my priority is that my daughter is healthy, I really hope she ends up being taller than me! Right now she is still itty bitty, at 3 1/2 she is only an inch taller than her 18 month old brother.

I think height takes the longest to gain back.....it is a long and tedious process in the body, and not nearly as simple as putting on weight. I'm trying not to expect too much as far as growth spurts until after my daughter's gut shows signs of healing. Judging by her stools, she is not even close to being completely healed, and she has been gluten free for 6 months.

I think a timely diagnosis is key. Certainly an undiagnosed case of celiac disease can stunt growth (just look at me :D ), that's common sense. But I think our little ones were diagnosed early enough that they will at least reach an acceptable height one day. Maybe they'll be an inch or two shorter than they would have been had they not had celiac disease........but they'll certainly be within the range of "normal" height.

Just give it time......growth spurts are an odd thing, and happen so randomly. My oldest son seems to have had one year where he didn't grow at all, but this year he seems to be outgrowing all of his clothes quicker than I can buy them!

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I wish there was more research on children catching up on growth once they are gluten free. My son has gained almost 4 pounds since being gluten free since May. Which is pretty good, but he is still SO tiny compared to other kids his age. He still wears 6-12 months. I have to agree though that clothes are crazy. I have three boys and the oldest is six. They are making clothes huge now! Sometimes the rear of pants are so big, I think I could fit into them. Anyway, I try not to worry about his height and weight. Actually his height is on the chart, but his weight is still catching up. I don't think his gut is normal either. He has days where he eats great and days where he is picky. He doesn't eat as well as my other two did, but I think he is getting enough, because of the bottles he still drinks to add calories. I really hope that him being malnourished for 8 months doesn't make him have short stature for life! I refuse to entertain that thought. I think as much growing as he has done so far is very positive and his doctors are happy with it.

I do agree with the smaller children being teased. It really stinks and doesn't seem fair. My goal is that they are healthy and that is what matters. Kids will find anything to tease another kid about, but doesn't make it right.

STill hoping my little guy will catch up! He is smart and adorable though! HA!

Monica

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No parent wants his child to be teased, but the fact is that it happens. Children learn to deal with it. It is a normal part of socialization. It used to be that the heavy children were the targets, but now it seems to be the smaller kids. I think it has to do with the fact that there are so many overweight children that they are actually normal-that is, it is now normal to be overweight. Therefore, the kids who are actually "normal" are seen as different, and thus picked on. I do not think a little teasing will hurt anyone, so I do not worry about it. Learning to deal with run of the mill actually teaches children coping skills ans how to stand up for themselves. BUT, I do think that there is a possibility that some kids will take it too far and the teasing becomes mean and hurtful. If this happens then the teacher should be informed!! I do not know any teachers who would not step in and do something, so if your child is suffering you need to have your child talk to the teacher about it.

As far as growth being permanently stunted, I have not seen it with celiac disease in children. The reason nutrition is important in infants is because it is obviously in a child's best interest to start out getting proper nutrition. It paves the way for the future and once good eating habits are developed it is likely they will continue. However, that does not mean children with celiac disease are not going to catch up. I think we need to keep in mind there is a difference between stunted growth and being short or thin. Some people are simply short, whether or not they are celiacs. It is certainly not the end of the world. Generally, a child's height at full growth will be in the middle of his parents heights. Of course there are exceptions, as there are in everything. I know a girl who was hospitalized as a baby because of her low weight, and undiagnosed celiac disease. She is now above average in height and weight. Children who are malnourished generally do catch up. My sister-in-law was malnourished when adopted and is no longer small. The point is that it is possible to catch up once given the proper nutrition.

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