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What Kind Of Doctor/specialist To See For Leaky Gut?


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#1 DChelleD

 
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Posted 07 August 2013 - 04:14 AM

I've only really heard of Leaky Gut Syndrom for about a year.  Before that I thought it was some kind of slang term used when someone had diarrhea.

 

I am seriously considering this as a possibility to all my suffering but I'm not sure where to find a doctor who is knowledgable with Leaky Gut.

 

I've dealth with GI problems most of my life. 7 years ago I had 1 blood test + the rest - for celiac disease but biopsies were negative.  During that same time I was DXed with rheumatoid arthritis (actual DX is pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis - I had symptoms dating back to my early teens that all my Drs missed).  I've been back and forth between gluten-free and gluten-light over the years.  A few months ago I had a couple of back to back sinus infections and the walk-in med care center suggested I do allergy testing (which they just started doing in their office).  I have some environmental allergies I am getting weekly shots for (none are really too bad though) and my IgG food allergies came back with several foods I am "allergic" to.  Severe level: Flaxseed; High level: wheat, gluten (no surprise to me), rye, rice, soybean, carrots, cows milk, peanuts; and Moderate level: beef, scallops.  I had some in the mild range as well.  My GI problems include alternating D and C, severe cramping (near the point of passing out), narrow stool with frequent change in consistency and color, gas, bloating, gurgling, fluttering, burping, flatulence, acid reflux, indigestion and burning in the stomach, inability to wipe clean, fecal incontinence, a LOT of mucus and sometimes bile (or that thick dark yellow liquidy stuff), hemorrhoids.  Other problems: nail fungus on both big toes, brittle/thin nails, yellowish teeth, hair loss, itchy scalp and skin all over (but no rash), foggy brain, terrible memory, can't focus, fatigue, anxiety, depression, headaches, occasional migranes, joint stiffness and pain.

 

I just recently went on a heavy gluten challenge to do another celiac disease panel. But I was gluten-light for a long time and then gluten-free for about 3 weeks, gluten-light for about another 3 weeks and then went gluten-heavy for 2 weeks before doing bloodwork.  BW came back negative, but with a low IgA ("minimally low, no clinical significance"). 

 

I'm not sure if I want to bother with another GI doctor to go foward with more celiac disease testing or find someone who specializes in Leaky Gut.  I did a quick search in my area on leaky gut and pulled up a few chiropracters/wellness practitioners that test/treat for it.   What kind of "doctor" should I be looking for?

 

 


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#2 stri8ed

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 10:38 AM

There is a scientifically valid way of testing for a leaky gut, its called the lactulose/mannitol test. The test essentially measures how permeable (leaky) your gut is. So a good idea would be to seek out a doctor who is familiar with this test, and can perform it for you.

 

If you think allergies/leaky-gut are the cause of your symptoms, you can try a rotation diet, which is usually the primary means of treating a leaky gut anyways. See my post here.


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#3 Renaye

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 11:33 AM

Hi!I also would like to find a reliable doc to treat a leaky gut. I am not sure that many doctors believe in the theory. My gastro just says to cut out what bothers you. I also have been suffering from gastro symptoms for most of my life. I am gluten free and probably a celiac but tests were inconclusive. I went to a naturopathic doc and he helped me by finding other food intolerances but he also wanted me to try things that my gastro and rhuemmy doc didn't believe in. I saw him for 2 appointments and I spent over $500 on just tests. So I am looking into books and articles to help me out.

I see a rhuemmy doctor because I have sjogren's. I don't have major joint pain but do have fatigue and dryness everywhere. If you find a cure for your toe fungus, let me know. I only have 5 normal toenails.

Renaye
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Positive DGP IgG & DGP IgA, negative biopsy, HLA typing unable to interpret, sicca syndrome, positive ANA, low WBC count, intolerant to peanuts, eggs, dairy, IBS-C, GERD.

#4 cyclinglady

 
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Posted 11 August 2013 - 04:00 PM

Toe nail fungus?  A medical doctor can prescribe topical Difulcan (an anti-fungal) if you don't want to take a systemic anti-fungal.    If you can't get that, then you can try a drop of Tea Tree Oil applied every night  on each nail for at least six months.  Don't dilute it.   It worked for me and I tried other over-the-counter products.  It's worth a try, it's cheap ($8.00) but it takes patience and you can't wear polish during that time!  Test the product in case you get a reaction (everyone's different).  

 

We use Tea Tree Oil on a regular basis.  I won't travel without it.  You can check out the internet for its safety.


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Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005
Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013
Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014
Anemia -- Resolved
Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013
Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013
Allergies and Food Intolerances
Diabetes -- January 2014




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#5 Renaye

 
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Posted 12 August 2013 - 05:47 PM

Cyclinglady

I started tea tree oil in June and also tried it in the past but with no luck. I don't know if I tried it long enough. I will try to be more consistent this time and hopefully have a better report to give you around Christmas. My doctor will not give me the systemic anti-fungal with my autoimmune problems. So it is either tea tree oil or pulling my nails!!!

Thanks

Renaye
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Positive DGP IgG & DGP IgA, negative biopsy, HLA typing unable to interpret, sicca syndrome, positive ANA, low WBC count, intolerant to peanuts, eggs, dairy, IBS-C, GERD.

#6 DChelleD

 
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Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:48 AM

Stri8ed – thank you for the tip on the test and the link. I am looking for all the info I can get. I never considered leaky gut until I had the IgG allergies and started researching it and leaky gut kept coming up.

Renaye – It doesn’t seem that many traditional doctors consider leaky gut to be a clinical finding, unfortunately. I did some local searches and have found that many Chiropractors also have holistic/alternative medicine practices (or “Wellness Centers”) that consider and treat leaky gut syndrome as part of their whole body “wellness” plan. Sounds like you found the same. Unfortunately, my insurance doesn’t cover ‘alternative medicine’ and I would have to pay for it out of pocket. $175 for first visit and $50 – $150 for each follow-up with going a couple times a week and tapering off. I can’t afford that right now, so, like you, I will have to try to deal with it myself. I also see a Rheumy for Rheumatoid Arthritis. I go back to her in a couple of weeks and will mention it to her and see what her take on it is. Maybe I can see if she will order the lactulose/mannitol test. It doesn’t hurt to ask.

Cyclinglady – thanks for the tip on tea tree oil. I’ve heard of that remedy but never tried it. I won’t use the systemic stuff because I just don’t want to risk side effects. I’ve tried the OTC stuff which does absolutely nothing. For several weeks I treated with apple cider vinegar soaks and applied vicks vapor rub. The vicks pretty much killed the nail and sort of detached it from the nail bed so I had to keep trimming them back really far. They grew back in an appeared fine but it wasn’t too long before the fungus came back.

Edited by DChelleD, 13 August 2013 - 04:48 AM.

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#7 cyclinglady

 
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Posted 13 August 2013 - 05:42 PM

It's a long, slow process with the tea tree oil.  Toe nails grow slowly, so it takes time -- like six months.  Then you have to pretty much maintain it each winter (that's when I do it cause it's too cold to go bare footed).  So, apply the oil, trim your nails every 2 to three weeks.  If you can, use it in the morning as well.  I keep a tiny bottle in my bedside table drawer and apply it right before I go to bed.  Make sure the oil is applied on, under and on the cuticle for complete coverage.  

 

The stuff works great for ringworm and athlete's foot too.   Plus, we use it on blemishes.  


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Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005
Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013
Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014
Anemia -- Resolved
Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013
Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013
Allergies and Food Intolerances
Diabetes -- January 2014




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