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My name is Sharon, and I just had some bloodwork and a colonoscopy and endoscopy done last month. My doctor has about 80% certainty that I have celiac, so he suggested I go gluten free for 6 months, and then do another biopsy.

I'm finding switching over to the gluten-free diet to be challenging, in the least. It's frustrating that gluten-free foods are so much more expensive. I do appreciate that some manufacturers list gluten-free foods on their websites--although I do have some doubts about whether Cheetos are really gluten-free as they say.

Hello, and sorry if I posted this in the wrong forum.

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I know what you mean about "challenging". It took me a while to figure it out too, and believe me I made a lot of mistakes (like spelt for instance, NOT gluten-free). I finally stopped buying processed food entirely for a while because it seemed like everything had some form of gluten in it! I quit eating out for a while too. Now I have worked a small amount of processed food back into my diet, and there are a few choice restaurants that i trust but most of my food is prepared in MY kitchen by ME. That's the only way I can be sure. And of course it takes time and effort to learn how to cook gluten-free (especially if you don't already know how to cook- I was lucky in that respect at least). But eventually you'll get used to it, really. In the meanwhile, I learned that corn chips, rice and potatoes are my starchy friends, I also learned not to over do the fruits and vegetables at first, your guts won't thank you.

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welcome! I hope the diet does help you. It can be hard at first, but catfish is right, once you get the hang of cooking, it really isn't that bad. (I really do seem to post this all the time... maybe I should change my signature to include it? ;-) ) Sticking with naturally gluten-free staples will help you keep it less expensive and easier. A LOT of recipes are NATURALLY gluten free. Rice, potatoes, corn, and yams are all good, common, inexpensive carbohydrate sources that can be used in a myriad of ways with a myriad of flavors (so you don't have to get bored of any particular one). All natural meats (no broth injected, or the like) are gluten-free as well, and of course there's a WIDE variety of types, and ways of cooking that can allow you to maximize small amounts of the cheaper cuts. Same thing with the produce aisle. (And the spice aisle. Spices can get expensive, but they last a long time, and make a HUGE difference in how things taste.)

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Sharon,

Upon diagnosis, I too ran to my local healthy food store and bought a bunch of processed gluten-free stuff I didn't think I could live without. Well, most of those are still in the cupboard because I just don't eat much of the specialty stuff. There are a lot more options in your regular store than you realize. (Yes, Cheetos are gluten-free, even though some don't eat them due to cross contamination issues I have never had a problem with them.)

I have found that the only thing I really can't find in a regular store is soy sauce (the jury is out on whether LaChoy is really gluten-free). I have purchased some cake, cookie, brownie mixes via mail order but requested that my commissary carry them AND THEY DO NOW! (I'm a Navy wife.) I did mail order some ready-made cookies, cinnamon bread and pizza crusts from Kathy's Creations and put them in the freezer. I'll eat a cookie every couple of days or so. I made my own mixes and put them in the freezer. That way if someone else is having sweets, I can too. I also bring them to work with me.

I also found that Publix carries some cereals that are gluten-free and SuperTarget has a couple of Bob's Red Mill items that are gluten-free (not all are, though - watch the label - it will say gluten-free).

I primarily eat meat, fresh veggies, potatos, rice, fruit. I have never had a problem with fruit that many have when first gluten-free. I love the stuff. We always try to make enough at supper to have leftovers for my lunch the next day. Eating out is not only difficult, it is very RISKY - always!

Pay attention to your body - it may be good for you to keep a food diary of EVERYTHING you eat for the first month or two because it's easier to figure out where you might slip up that way. Read all you can - there are other forums besides this one that are good, too. You can join as many as you have time to read! I regularly visit 3: delphi, yahoo sillyyaks and here. All have a different "specialty" or flavor and you'll quickly develop a favorite.

Good luck and hang in there.

Celeste

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Sharon, i was just recently diagnosed in July. I found out that in Canada there is an income tax form that gives you back the difference in cost. I keep all my receipts. Hope you live in a country that does this.

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