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    Caris Diagnostics Presents New Gastrointestinal Research at American College of Gastroenterology


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/15/2012 - At the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) 2011 Annual Scientific Meeting held in Washington, DC, Caris Diagnostics, a leader in anatomic pathology services, presented 15 abstracts highlighting new findings that reflect and expand Caris' commitment to gastrointestinal disease research.


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    Caris DiagnosticsHighlights from the presentation include two studies, in particular. The first study, "High Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Women With Young Onset Collagenous Colitis," found that young women with collagenous colitis are eight times more likely than the general population to have celiac disease.

    That study was authored by Ahmed Bedeir, MD, Bhaskar Ganguly, and Mukunda Ray, MD, PhD. As Dr. Bedeir's finding is gleaned from the largest series of young patients with collagenous colitis ever reported, the study team recommends that women age 40 or younger who have a diagnosis of collagenous colitis also undergo an EGD with duodenal biopsies to exclude concurrent celiac disease.

    The second study, "Seasonal Patterns in Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Analysis by Month of Diagnosis and Month of Birth," showed that, contrary to previous suggestions derived from smaller series, there was no evidence of monthly or seasonal variation even within known regions with diverse climates among our 10,000 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    That study was authored by Jennifer M. Hurrell, DO, Amnon Sonnenberg, MD, and Robert M. Genta, MD, FACG.

    Regarding Caris' commitment to gastrointestinal disease research, Richard H. Lash, MD, Chief Medical Officer for Caris says that the "establishment of the Caris Research Institute as a structure for promoting and carrying out research has again generated a strong presence at the annual ACG meeting in Washington, D.C," adding that Caris remains  "committed to leveraging our tremendous database and academic talent to answer important questions in the field of gastroenterology and are honored to have the opportunity to present our findings at ACG 2011."

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    I want to thank Jefferson Adams for keeping up on the latest research and posting it here. I get a lot of information from him that I would otherwise miss out on.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    (Celiac.com 05/14/2000) Some bishops conferences (e.g.: Chile) have allowed communicants to take communion in the form of consacrated wine alone. Nowadays, in some countries (the U.K. for instance), wafers made of wheat which contains only traces of gluten - and hence probably not deletereous for the celiac patient - are being made. The Vatican has allowed the use of such wafers through a statement of the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith of June 19th, 1995.
    The Bishops Conference of England and Wales, for instance, has stated recently that they follow the 1995 norms on low-gluten altar breads from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. In implementing these norms, the Conference established a certificate for those affected by the coeliac condition. This is then administered in the local diocese.
    The following comes from the report of the English and Welsh bishops meeting of November 1997. Certificate for coeliac sufferers:
    At its Low Week 1996 meeting, the Bishops Conference asked that its advisory panel on the coeliac condition draw up a suitable certificate for use by those with the coeliac condition to show that they have received permission for the use of low-gluten altar breads as valid matter for the celebration of Mass. Such a certificate was approved by the Bishops Conference. Britain has one of the highest rates of the coeliac condition in the world. This certificate enables sufferers to present a low-gluten host for consecration, particularly when traveling and in regions where they are not known by the priest. Those with the condition may obtain the certificate by applying to their parish priest. - Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, norms concerning the use of low-gluten altar breads and mustum [non-alcoholic wine] as matter for the celebration of the Eucharist, 22 June 1995.
    I. Concerning permission to use low-gluten altar breads: A. This may be granted by Ordinaries to priests and laypersons affected by celiac disease, after presentation of a medical certificate. B. Conditions for the validity of the matter: 1. Special hosts quibus glutinum ablatum est are invalid matter for the celebration of the Eucharist; 2. Low-gluten hosts are valid matter, provided that they contain the amount of gluten sufficient to obtain the confection of bread, that there is no addition of foreign materials, and that the procedure for making such hosts is not such as to alter the nature of the substance of the bread. II. Concerning permission to use mustum: A. The preferred solution continues to be Communion per intinctionem, or in concelebration under the species of bread alone. B. Nevertheless, the permission to use mustum can be granted by Ordinaries to priests affected by alcoholism or other conditions which prevent the ingestion of even the smallest quantity of alcohol, after presentation of a medical certificate. C. By mustum is understood fresh juice from grapes, or juice preserved by suspending its fermentation (by means of freezing or other methods which do not alter its nature). D. In general, those who have received permission to use mustum are prohibited from presiding at concelebrated Masses. There may be some exceptions however: in the case of a Bishop or Superior General; or, with prior approval of the Ordinary, at the celebration of the anniversary of priestly ordination or other similar occasions. In these cases, the one who presides is to communicate under both the species of bread and that of mustum, while for the other concelebrants a chalice shall be provided in which normal wine is to be consecrated. E. In the very rare instances of laypersons requesting this permission, recourse must be made to the Holy See. III. Common Norms: A. The Ordinary must ascertain that the matter used conforms to the above requirements. B. Permissions are to be given only for as long as the situation continues which motivated the request. C. Scandal is to be avoided. D. Given the centrality of the celebration of the Eucharist in the life of the priest, candidates for the priesthood who are affected by celiac disease or suffer from alcoholism or similar conditions may not be admitted to Holy Orders. E. Since the doctrinal questions in this area have now been decided, disciplinary competence is entrusted to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. F. Concerned Episcopal Conferences shall report to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments every two years regarding the application of these norms. Thanks are given to Tom Horwood, Esq., Catholic Media Office, The Bishops Conference of England and Wales, and to Ernesto Guifaldes, M.D. of the Pontificia Unicersidad Catolica de Chile.

    According to the UK Coeliac Society you can now obtain gluten-free Communion Wafers from the following:
    Eiren Religious Supplies
    Concord House
    Union Drive
    Sutton Coldfield
    West Midlands
    IB73 5TE
    UK

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/01/2010 - Coeliac UK has named the winners for their 2010 Gluten-free Chef of the Year Competition.
    Two-star Michelin chef Raymond Blanc OBE FIH announced the winners for each category during a special presentation at his award winning restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons in Oxfordshire.
    The competition had two categories; Gluten-free Chef of the Year, open to professional chefs and Up and Coming Gluten-free Chef of the Year, open to catering students.
    This year's Gluten-free Chef of the Year is Peter McKenzie, of South Lanarkshire Council. Runner Up was Candice Webber, of The Restaurant at St.Paul's Catherdral.
    Up and Coming Gluten-free Chef of the Year is Shanice Parris of Westminster Kingsway College. Runner Up is Daniel Beech, who works at the restaurant 'Simon Radley at the Chester Grosvenor'.
    See Gluten-free Chef of the Year Peter McKenzie's winning menu, Candice Webber's Runner-up menu, along with the menu for Up and Coming Gluten-free Chef of the Year, Shanice Parris
    The Gluten-free Chef of the Year competition is part of the Eating Out campaign through which looks to increase awareness of celiac disease and the gluten-free diet among chefs and catering students. 
    By asking chefs and catering students to create gluten-free menus for the competition, sponsors hope to spread awareness and interest in gluten-free cooking within the industry.
    One thing is certainly true, all entrants and winners deserve a hand from those with celiac disease and gluten intolerance.
    Source:

    Eatout Magazine

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - The most recent industry report by Research and Markets offers a comprehensive analysis of key players in the gluten-free product industry, major gluten-free product types and their sales channels, with commentary on developments and trends.
    The report also provides a detailed analysis on various phases of numerous aspects of the gluten-free products industry, along with the competitive strategies favored by major industry players.
    Among the reports insights: As large supermarkets and mass retailers offer more gluten-free products, gluten-free sales by health and natural food stores are declining.
    Over the last ten years, as millions of Americans have stopped consuming products containing gluten from wheat, barley, or rye, the market for gluten-free foods and other products has shifted, and many products once regarded as specialty or niche products are now regarded as regular grocery items.
    The report projects global gluten-free product market to reach $6.2 billion at a CAGR of 10.2% by 2018. The report also provides market details and analysis for North America, now the largest market for gluten-free products, and for Europe, which is expected to show significant growth in the market in the near future.
    Some of that growth is attributed to a steady stream of new gluten-free products in the market, offering additional nutrition, new ingredients or flavors.
    The also report projects increased demand countries such as U.K., Italy, U.S., Spain, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and India, among others.
    The full report is available for purchase at: Gluten-Free Products Market By Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography — Global Trends & Forecasts To 2018

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/04/2014 - Not long ago, the market for gluten-free products was regarded as a market of specialty products intended for niche shoppers and vendors. That has changed rapidly, as the market has evolved into a bona fide mainstream market serving shoppers with a strong affiliation for gluten-free products.
    The overall market for gluten-free products is currently dominated by North American manufacturers and vendors, followed by their European counterparts. An abundance of new products and steadily rising consumer demand are driving the strong growth in the gluten-free products market.
    A comprehensive new report in the market breaks down the overall market into geographic and products segments. The report is titled “Gluten-Free Products Market by Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, and Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019”
    The report divides the gluten-free products market into four geographical segments, North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ROW. North America is projected to witness the highest growth rate in the market.
    The report defines and analyzes the market in terms of monetary value, volume, trends, opportunities, burning issues, winning imperatives, and challenges.
    Those interested in the full report can browse 193 market data tables and 32 figures spread through 366 pages and in-depth TOC on "Gluten-Free Products Market by Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, and Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019".

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.