No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Center for Celiac Disease Opens at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Celiac.com 09/28/2006 - The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia announces the establishment of the Center for Celiac Disease, a multidisciplinary resource created to diagnose, treat and provide support for patients and families with celiac disease.

"A person with celiac disease is unable to digest gluten, a common ingredient found in many foods, including bread, pasta and even condiments," said Ritu Verma, M.D., gastroenterologist and director of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital. "This inability to digest gluten damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents the body from absorbing essential nutrients. The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet."

One of the challenges of celiac disease is that though it is relatively common, affecting approximately one in 133 people, the warning signs like small stature, fatigue and stomach irritation are relatively vague and may mimic other disorders like inflammatory bowel disease or lactose intolerance, making it difficult to diagnose. In some cases symptoms may be so mild that they are overlooked entirely. If celiac disease is not diagnosed, patients may face problems with osteoporosis, internal organ disorders and internal bleeding.

"The average patient lives with celiac disease for 11 years before being properly diagnosed," said Dr. Verma. "The goal of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital is for families to get the answers they need and receive a comprehensive treatment plan and support that will last a lifetime."

Ads by Google:

The Center for Celiac Disease consists of a multidisciplinary team of specialists including physicians, nutritionists, nurses, educators, laboratory technicians and clinical researchers, who provide individualized nutrition counseling and care for each patient.

"Celiac disease not only affects the child diagnosed with the disease, but also the entire family because treatment requires a drastic change in lifestyle and diet," said Jennifer Autodore, R.D, LDN, clinical nutritionist at Childrens Hospital. "That is why at Childrens Hospitals Center for Celiac Disease we offer care from highly-trained specialists, in addition to family education sessions and support groups where information about the latest gluten-free restaurants and recipes is shared. The Center also provides comprehensive family screenings and support and direction to advocate for gluten-free menu items in the childrens schools."

The Center for Celiac Disease at The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia is one of the largest resources in the Northeast United States, dedicated solely to the care of children with celiac disease. The Center currently treats more than 350 patients from Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey. For more information on the Center for Celiac Disease please visit http://www.chop.edu or call 215-590-1680 to make an appointment.

The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nations first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Childrens Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking second in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


It sounds like your hives resolved. I had a six month bout with them. Antihistamines really helped. My doctors are not sure if Mast Cell or autoimmune is the root cause.

My kid has Raynauds. It freaks her classmates out. She wears shoes and wool socks all year round and we live in a warm state. It is autoimmune. She manages it by layering, turning up the heat, use lots of blanket throws. I have Hashimoto?s and celiac disease. So, having multiple autoi...

Well, you do need to replace some things because they are too porous or damaged to remove gluten. Things like old wooden spoons, scratched non-stick pans, toaster, colander, sponges, etc. Honestly, the list is long, so try getting a few celiac books at the library or Amazon. Consider reading t...

When I woke up from my Endoscopy and was told I definitely had celiac disease the first thing I asked my doctor was do I need to get all new kitchen stuff? He assured me that I did not, and as long as my pots and pans and everything else was washed after being used to cook gluten I would have no ...

They have all given you good advice. Like Ennis_Tx said this is not medical advice. Just some observations. Ennis_Tx mentioned already a good B-complex. But people who have Perncious Anemia low B-12 have "Pens and Needles' feeling in their extremities. Mine was much more ...