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Center for Celiac Disease Opens at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Celiac.com 09/28/2006 - The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia announces the establishment of the Center for Celiac Disease, a multidisciplinary resource created to diagnose, treat and provide support for patients and families with celiac disease.

"A person with celiac disease is unable to digest gluten, a common ingredient found in many foods, including bread, pasta and even condiments," said Ritu Verma, M.D., gastroenterologist and director of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital. "This inability to digest gluten damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents the body from absorbing essential nutrients. The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet."

One of the challenges of celiac disease is that though it is relatively common, affecting approximately one in 133 people, the warning signs like small stature, fatigue and stomach irritation are relatively vague and may mimic other disorders like inflammatory bowel disease or lactose intolerance, making it difficult to diagnose. In some cases symptoms may be so mild that they are overlooked entirely. If celiac disease is not diagnosed, patients may face problems with osteoporosis, internal organ disorders and internal bleeding.

"The average patient lives with celiac disease for 11 years before being properly diagnosed," said Dr. Verma. "The goal of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital is for families to get the answers they need and receive a comprehensive treatment plan and support that will last a lifetime."

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The Center for Celiac Disease consists of a multidisciplinary team of specialists including physicians, nutritionists, nurses, educators, laboratory technicians and clinical researchers, who provide individualized nutrition counseling and care for each patient.

"Celiac disease not only affects the child diagnosed with the disease, but also the entire family because treatment requires a drastic change in lifestyle and diet," said Jennifer Autodore, R.D, LDN, clinical nutritionist at Childrens Hospital. "That is why at Childrens Hospitals Center for Celiac Disease we offer care from highly-trained specialists, in addition to family education sessions and support groups where information about the latest gluten-free restaurants and recipes is shared. The Center also provides comprehensive family screenings and support and direction to advocate for gluten-free menu items in the childrens schools."

The Center for Celiac Disease at The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia is one of the largest resources in the Northeast United States, dedicated solely to the care of children with celiac disease. The Center currently treats more than 350 patients from Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey. For more information on the Center for Celiac Disease please visit http://www.chop.edu or call 215-590-1680 to make an appointment.

The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nations first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Childrens Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking second in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents.

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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hi Allie and welcome First off, I know 3 years was a long wait, but at 17 you've figured out celiac way before many people do. That should make a big impact on minimising its effects and helping you with the diet, so, bizarrely enough, congratulations! A lot of good advice has been brought together in this thread: Don't worry that your symptoms are bad now. As you follow the diet your body will begin healing itself and you're still very young so hopefully this will go really smoothly. Think in terms of the next 6 months rather than weeks however, recovery will likely take a little time. Eat as healthily as you can, lots of whole foods and try to avoid the gluten free processed substitutes as your digestive system needs all the help it can get at this moment. You may want to avoid dairy as well for now and think about reintroducing it later. This site has been really helpful to me and others. I hope you find it just as useful. Best of luck! ps, your increased reaction to gluten during the challenge phase was perfectly normal. Many find that reintroducing it much worse than the initial affects and take some time to get over the challenge. That's why you'll see lots of posts here urging folks to 'stay on gluten' till their testing is complete!

Hi! My daughter is 19 was diagnosed at age 16. It took about 12-18 month s for her to fully heal from the damage and feel "normal" again. Also because of the damage done she had reactions to dairy, so you may want to try no or minimum dairy until youre fully healed. Just a suggestion. Hope you start feeling well soon!

Hi yall! New to this blog, but really glad it exists because I have lots of questions. First off, I'm Allie! I'm 17 and newly diagnosed Celiac after about 3 years of searching for answers. I initially went gluten-free on the recommendation of a friend, I felt better in about a month and then my pediatric gastroenterologist had me do the gluten challenge, and my symptoms were the worst they have ever been, and ones I barely noticed before became very present. I did the biopsy and was diagnosed, it's been about 2 weeks and my symptoms are still pretty bad, although my diet has no known sources of gluten or cross contamination. Wondering if anyone has any input on healing post gluten challenge, any tips or how long it took for you would be quite helpful! Thanks

Might want to look into a keto diet, I have UC on top of celiacs and keto is working great Yeah I have major nerve and brain issues with gluten, gluten ataxia with nerve issues and brain issues. Seems to cause my body to attack my brain and nerve system. My brain stumbles fogs, and starts looping, the confusion causes me to become really irritable, I call it going Mr Hyde. Like my mind will start looping constantly on thoughts and not move driving me literally mad, or it used to. Now days it is primary the numbness anger but the gut issues and sometimes random motor loss limit me motionless to the floor now days for the duration of the major anger effects. Used to be a lot more mental then painful gut. I did a mental trauma post on it on while back where I came out about all my mental issues with gluten.

^^^^^^ good info, tips and tricks^^^^^^^^^ yes, crumbs will make you sick. also, breathing flour/pancake mix, etc that is in the air because eventually, you're going to swallow some.