No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Tips for Ensuring a Gluten-Free Hospital Stay

Celiac.com 03/05/2009 - Nurse Cynthia Kupper, RD, CD, and the good folks over at Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) recently circulated a helpful checklist to help you and your loved ones ensure a successful gluten-free hospital visit. Here's a summary of their recommendations:

  1. Be sure to make a copy of this checklist, distribute it to your family members, and keep it with you during your hospital visit.
  2. Keep this checklist with your chart of current medications, along with the names and addresses of each of your health care providers.
  3. Present a copy of this checklist to the managing nurse of the ward where you will be staying. It's also a good idea to make sure a copy goes to the pre-admission staff to ensure the information is placed at the front of your chart or documented in your computerized medical record. Be sure to ask that it be made easily visible to anyone inspecting your chart.
  4. Arrange for a written note from a doctor mandating a gluten-free diet. Be sure that the note clearly labels your condition as an allergy, so that there is no confusion among the staff about your dietary needs. If your visit requires you to be admitted, then, prior to your admission, arrange to meet with a representative from the departments that will be involved in your stay, such as pre-op, surgery, medical/surgery, pharmacy, nutrition services-dietitian, rehabilitation, etc.
  5. Ask for a allergy alert wristband, and consider requesting that the following words be printed
    Ads by Google:

    in BOLDFACE on your chart, near your bed, or on the outside of your door: Celiac Disease: All foods and medications must be verified gluten-free!
  6. See if you can bring food and medicines you know to be gluten-free. If permitted, clearly label all food and medicine containers with your full name, date and room number.
  7. If your visit is unplanned, then arrange to speak with the hospital's Registered Dietitian as soon as you can. If you're unable, then make sure your family or care-giver knows in advance to make this arrangement. Since some dietary staff members may be unfamiliar with the intricacies of the gluten-free diet (Diet Technicians, Nutrition Assistants, Meal Assistants, etc.), it's good practice to speak directly with the Dietitian.
  8. Work with the Dietitian. Find out how the hospital chooses its gluten-free foods, and how those foods are processed in the kitchen. Find out who is in charge of for approving the hospital's gluten-free offerings.
  9. Bring some non-perishable gluten-free back-up snacks as rules permit. Gluten-free favorites like cookies, crackers, condiments, and cereal are easy to store. Label all food with your full name and room number.
  10. For a scheduled visits, see if you can get the dietary department to order some special gluten-free pasta, muffin mix, cake mix, or bread to make during your stay. Ask if you can supply your own. If a dietary staff offer to make shop for you, remind them not to select food from bulk bins.
Source: Gluten Intolerance Group
Cynthia Kupper, RD, CD

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Shelbia Ward
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
10 Mar 2009 9:42:52 AM PDT
very good information

 
Barbara Adarna
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
11 Mar 2009 2:59:36 PM PDT
Much food for thought.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

JaneWhoLovesRain, what is odder to me than that there is an older disease that Doctor's have forgotten that explains many of the same symptom's and doctor's do not even think about it today since the "War on Pellagra" was declared over a 100 years and why doctor's don't (at least in the West) think about it any more. Dr. Heaney wrote a nice online article about this topic. http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/11/18/pellagra-and-the-four-ds/ Here is fairly recent article about how Pellagra can present in patients and the title says' it all from the International Journal of Dermatology. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227807440_Pellagra_Dermatitis_dementia_and_diarrhea Dermatitis, dementia and Diarrhea are the 3 D's (4th D is death) of Pellagra. Typically it is only diagnosed today if you are in a subset of the population like an alcoholic for example or you have a gastric bypass. See this article from the New England Journal of Medicine http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm050641 and despite all the signs of Pellagra (skin issues etc.) . . .. Pellagra in it native tongue (Italian) where it was first diagnosed was called "rough/sour skin" who knows that today??????? Very few I would venture to guess. The NEJM can only say they have "Pellagra-like dermatitis" it has been so long since any doctor's seen it they can't (with confidence) diagnose it clinically. But taking Niacinamide 3/day for 6 months can help alleviate your symptom's if indeed the DH of Celiac is the dermatitis of Pellagra being medically misdiagnosed. Here is a an article featured on celiac.com about why/how Pellagra can be confused for Celiac disease. https://www.celiac.com/articles/24658/1/A-Differential-Diagnosis-How-Pellagra-Can-be-Confused-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html Because they haven't seen Pellagra in 75+ years no one recognizes it anymore. ****this is not medical advice. I hope this is helpful. Knitty Kitty and I are the Niacin warriors on this board. See this thread where Knitty Kitty says Niacin helped the itching of DH. If that is so then it might help your DH (if you have it) and your GI problems too if they are caused by co-morbid Pellagra. see my blog post about where I say "I had Celiac Disease and Developed Pellagra" that talks about this in more detail. Again good luck and your continued journey and I hope this is helpful. 2 Timothy 2: 7 ?Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things? this included. posterboy by the grace of God,

I should say I am confused about how to interpret--- Does this mean celiac or no celiac? Thank you all---I greatly appreciate it.

KathleenH, I swear by MatteosPizza and they make National Delivery. I have been known to buy them by the dozen. https://www.matteospizza.com/ BellaMonica's is not a bad corn based crust. By not bad I mean "suprisingly good" that can be bought at most grocery stores. Here is there ZIP locator page to see if they are carried in your local area. http://glutenfreepizza.typepad.com/gluten-free-pizza/where-to-find-bella-monica.html I hope this is helpful. posterboy,

Hey all--have Hashimoto's and am being worked up for epigastric discomfort and IBS like symptoms--- My blood work had an IgA within the lower end of normal range, negative TTG, but weakly positive DGP. My endoscopy showed a "nodular" duodenum with the biopsy stating there was "reactive lymphoid hyperplasia"... I have a follow-up with the GI in 3 weeks. Wondering about any help?

DH wasn't linked to celiacs until 1967 from my research...