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Higher Suicide Rates in Celiac Disease Patients

Celiac.com 10/03/2011 - A number of studies show that people with celiac disease have higher risk of depression and death from external causes, but there are no conclusive studies on death from suicide.

A research team set out to more deeply examine the risk of suicide in people with celiac disease. The team included J. F. Ludvigsson, C. Sellgren, B. Runeson, N. Långström, and P. Lichtenstein. They are affiliated with the Department of Paediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Sweden.

cc-Jessia_HimeThe team examined suicide risk in individuals with celiac disease where the small intestinal biopsy showed no villous atrophy.

For their study, the team collected biopsy data from all 28 clinical pathology departments in Sweden for 29,083 individuals diagnosed during 1969-2007 with celiac disease with Marsh 3 villous atrophy, with inflammation without villous atrophy (Marsh 1-2; n=13,263), or with positive celiac disease serology, but normal mucosa (Marsh 0, n=3719).

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The team used Cox regression to calculated hazard ratios for suicide as recorded in the Swedish Cause of Death Register.

The team found that people with celiac disease have a higher risk for suicide compared to general population control subjects (HR=1.55; 95%CI=1.15-2.10; based on 54 completed suicides).

The results showed that suicide was more common among those who suffered from inflammation (HR=1.96; 95%CI=1.39-2.77), but the team found no such increase in people who showed positive celiac disease serology, but normal mucosa. (HR=1.06; 95%CI=0.37-3.02).

Overall, the team found a slightly higher risk of suicide in patients with celiac disease than in the general population. The increased risk is one that merits attention from doctors, when treating patients with celiac disease.

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3 Responses:

 
Marissa
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said this on
03 Oct 2011 10:09:54 AM PDT
What they were studying is correlation, not causation. The results are completely unsurprising, given that celiac patients have a higher risk of treatment-resistant depression. Furthermore, there are grueling situational effects that can lead to depression, unrelated physiologically to the celiac itself. Some of these are lack of adequate medical treatment, family support, or social inclusion.

Better studies need to be designed to tease out these effects, and to test why celiac has the neurological impacts often observed in patients.

 
SandraB
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said this on
12 Oct 2011 4:50:56 AM PDT
Celiacs develop nutritional deficiencies, and some of these may be linked to developing depression. Selenium, perhaps. The B vitamins, perhaps. The pre-hormone called D3, even. If there is causation - and I would put money on it - this would surely be the area to examine.
Do gluten sensitives, as well as celiacs, develop nutritional deficiencies? Science has no idea. Dr Alessio Fasano, your research is crucial to gluten sensitive mothers of gluten sensitive highly anxious/depressive autistic children across the globe. Please hurry.

 
Pippy
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said this on
03 Jul 2016 5:31:14 PM PDT
It is now 2016, have there been more recent studies on suicide and celiacs? Gluten free for 1 year now, feel better overall, but still very depressed.




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