23160 Really Good Potato Leek Soup (Gluten-Free) - Celiac.com
No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Really Good Potato Leek Soup (Gluten-Free)

One of the few things better than a delicious soup is a rich, delicious soup that is easy and quick to make.

In this recipe for potato leek soup, butter, chicken broth, leeks, cream and potatoes come together to yield a rich, luscious soup that goes great with your favorite toasted gluten-free bread.

The finished potato leek soup. Photo: CC--avlxyzIngredients:
1 cup butter
2 leeks, sliced
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons chives, chopped
4 sprigs fresh thyme
10 black peppercorns
1 quart gluten-free chicken broth
1 cup dry white wine
4 cups Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced
1½ cups heavy cream
½ tablespoon white pepper
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
Trim away the green portions of the leek, leaving just the white part.

Keep the two largest and longest leaves, and make a bouquet garni by folding the 2 leaves around the bay leaves, peppercorns and thyme. Tie into a package-shaped bundle with kitchen twine and set aside. Or, place two leek leaves, bay leaves, peppercorns and thyme together in a piece of cheesecloth.

Ads by Google:

Cut the white part of the leek in half lengthwise, and rinse well under cold running water to make sure the leek is clean. Slice thinly crosswise and set aside.

In a large pot over medium heat, melt butter. Cook leeks in butter with salt and pepper until tender, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes. Add the chopped leeks and cook until wilted, about 5 minutes.

Add the wine and bring to a boil. Add the reserved bouquet garni, chicken stock, potatoes, salt and white pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are falling apart and the soup is very flavorful.

Remove the herbs and peppercorns. Adding just a little bit at a time, puree the soup in a food processor or blender. Be careful! Cover top with a towel to prevent scalding if any soup escapes.

Stir in the creme and season with salt and pepper as desired.

Spoon soup into serving bowls and top with chopped chives.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



4 Responses:

 
Cynthia Flick
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
14 Jan 2013 6:42:57 AM PDT
Confused:

The directions advise to "add the wine" but no wine is listed in the ingredients.

 
Micki
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
19 Jan 2013 10:43:49 AM PDT
It does say 1 cup dry wine.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
21 Jan 2013 1:55:45 PM PDT
Thanks for pointing that out! I've made the correction. Enjoy!

 
Wendy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
31 Jul 2013 7:29:18 AM PDT
I will be making this for a group of about 40 people. How much does one batch make? I'd need about 1 cup per person.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

I wanted to collect some of the info on NCGI in one place so that visitors who test negative but may still have an issue with gluten can be directed there. I'll add to this post as I find new links, but feel free to add or contribute anything you think may be of use! Matt --- Useful links: An overview from Alessio Fasano, one of the world's leading researchers on celiac and gluten sensitivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvfTV57iPUY A scholarly overview from celiac disease magazine: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Knut_Lundin/publication/232528784_Non-celiac_Gluten_Sensitivity/links/09e415098bbe37c05b000000.pdf A good overview from a sceptical but fair perspective: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/a-balanced-look-at-gluten-sensitivity/ Another overview: https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-2/ University of Chicago's excellent celiac site's take: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/category/faq-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity/ A compelling account in the British Medical Journal from an NCGI patient: http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e7982 Here's some positive news about a potential new test: http://www.medicaldaily.com/non-celiac-gluten-insensitivity-blood-test-392850 NCGI in children: NCGI and auto immune study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26026392 Also consider: Fodmaps: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/research/divisions/dns/projects/fodmaps/faq.aspx This Monash study: http://fodmapmonash.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/the-truth-behind-non-celiac-gluten.html suggested some who think they're reacting to gluten should actually be reducing fodmaps Sibo: http://www.webmd.boots.com/digestive-disorders/small-intestinal-bacteria-sibo

I was just diagnosed in March and I totally feel you. I'm having a hard enough time with determining which lip glosses are safe, let alone all my face products etc. I feel like this 'grey area' is the biggest annoyance with Celiac. So many foods/cosmetics I thought were safe after reading the ingredient list are actually not safe at all! One website says it's safe, one says its not. All these unfamiliar ingredients and even after googling term after term still so many grey areas!! I'm sure in time it gets easier and second nature and you learn by trial and error but holy this constant uncertainty is super annoying haha.

This place is great. Learning a lot. Honestly, I've known people with celiacs in the past, but it never occurred to me that that's what could be wrong with me. But the more I learn, the more it fits. One more thought, the articles I'm reading seem to say that we need to avoid gluten meticulously. I'm certain that I didn't accidentally eat gluten, because I've basically only eaten meat and veggies. But, my family has continued eating as normal. My kids making pancakes and it getting in the air, toast with all the crumbs everywhere, etc. Could that exposure be enough to keep my blood antibodies high? Or does it need to be ingested?

Hey, I had Hashi's some 15 years prior to my celiac disease diagnosis. My doc put me on a very lose dose of Armour. It did bring down my antibodies (by half), but they were extremely high to begin with (anything over 30 was positive and mine initially were close to 4,000). My nodules and enlargement stayed constant. Both actually went away since I have been gluten free! Like Gemini, I am on Armour for life! But that's okay. Just had my TPO checked yesterday, in fact, and now the number is 360. So, better, but that lab range is anything over 15 is positive. No reappearance of the nodules or enlargement. I am also on a low carb high fat diet to treat my diabetes too.

Yes! Call University of Chicago! Switching you from one medication that's not working to another and back again isn't helping you. It's definitely time to look at something else. I'm so sorry that you're not feeling better.