No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Lucky Charms is Now Gluten-free!

General Mills announces that Lucky Charms cereal is now gluten-free.


Lucky Charms cereal is the latest General Mills cereal to go gluten-free. Photo: CC--Mike Mozart

Celiac.com 10/10/2016 - Good news for anyone on a gluten-free diet who misses their beloved Lucky Charms breakfast cereal.

Lucky Charms joins a number of General Mills' other brands with gluten-free versions, including Chex and Cheerios. In this case, the company turned an old brand into a gluten-free product.

Like Cheerios, Lucky Charms are made from oats, which are gluten-free, except that most major commercial oat supplies have minor, but problematic, amounts of other grains.

To solve that, General Mills has created a process that sorts "out the small amount of wheat, rye and barley in our supply of whole oats that are inadvertently introduced at the farms where the oats are grown, or during transportation of the whole oats to our mill," according to the company.

Ads by Google:

General Mills has applied for patents on their unique sorting process that ensures General Mills’ gluten-free cereals meet the FDA's strict guideline for gluten free, said Emily Thomas, senior marketing manager for Lucky Charms in a press release.

One advantage of General Mills sorting process is that it allows the company to formulate gluten-free options without altering their recipes, or changing their flavor.

One thing consumers can count on, says Thomas, is that “…the recipe won't change. It will maintain the same great, magically delicious taste that Lucky Charms fans love."

Read more: Investopedia  

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



8 Responses:

 
Jen
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
17 Oct 2016 11:58:35 AM PDT
Gluten free watch dog has done some great articles on the sorting process for oats that this article mentions... I wouldn't trust GMs sorting process!

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
17 Oct 2016 2:53:03 PM PDT
To date their process seems to be working, as there are no reports of gluten in their cereals. It is easy to make such a claim, but big claims require some evidence to support them.

 
Julie
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Oct 2016 7:26:04 PM PDT
No reports of gluten?! What about all the terrible reports of glutenings from Cheerios!? At least in the hundreds from just what I've personally read in chatrooms etc. Myself and my daughter included. Many Celiac bloggers, gluten free reviewers, chatrooms, etc have already covered the Cheerios topic, besides just Gluten Free Watchdog! The reports of people being glutened by Cheerios are never ending. I personally am not a Celiac who just believes anything new must be evil and glutened. I have given many new things a chance. My 8 year old daughter and I both have Celiac Disease, and we were both very excited about Cheerios. Until we became violently glutened, that is, upon the very first release. Then, all the reports of glutenings, and bad publicity, followed. So we were definitely not just following a herd of complainers or anything. This "process" the company is using is disgusting and disrespectful to Celiacs. Have you even watched the videos of the process? If cross contamination is dangerous to us, how is this process remotely ok? How about I pour you a bowl of regular cereal mixed with gluten free cereal, and then I'll just pick out the gluten pieces?!

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
18 Oct 2016 12:38:34 PM PDT
While there are anecdotal reports of people getting sick, why no boxes testing positive for gluten? It is well known that a certain number of celiacs are also oat intolerant, and should also not eat oats, but this condition is not celiac disease.

 
Jefferson Adams
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
02 Nov 2016 10:02:54 PM PDT
As far as we know not a single box has tested positive for gluten over 20ppm. Until we get actual evidence, not reports of evidence, but actual evidence, color me very skeptical of these claims.

 
Jefferson Adams
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
07 Nov 2016 9:31:00 AM PDT
There are also many anecdotal reports of very sensitive celiacs eating General Mills Gluten Free cereals with no adverse reactions. Do we believe the people who say the product makes them sick, or the people who say it does not? The answer is: Until we get actual evidence, we push neither side. We suggest that people use caution and evaluate the products based on their own experience. Also, we definitely encourage anyone who suspects gluten contamination to report it.

 
Suzanne
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
28 Nov 2016 7:12:45 AM PDT
Child having gluten reaction to Lucky Charms but does not with Cheerios...anyone else?

 
Jefferson Adams
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
29 Nov 2016 10:01:14 AM PDT
An excerpt from the Celiac Disease Foundation, regarding General Mills' Gluten Free Cheerios: "Our Medical Advisory Board has no evidence that General Mills gluten-free cereals are not safe for celiac consumption. General Mills is a proud sponsor of Celiac Disease Foundation, and they understand the importance of safe gluten-free food to our community. In fact, we enjoy Cheerios at the National Office ourselves where half of us have celiac disease. Cheerios only need to be avoided by those with celiac disease who also cannot tolerate oats. "




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


I totally understand. Ive noticed the same thing when I started really ramping up my fitness program. To start, cut out the 30 day challenges. If your serious about fitness, you will incorporate it as a normal entity of life. We already have compromised immune systems so...

Yes^, usually if you tell them about celiac, they know. Almost all nurses know what celiac is. If not, tell them what you can and can't consume. There is no such thing as gluten in IV. They always have fruits and juices at hospitals, you can ask for those. Staff in an ER, will always be very kind...

A ketogenic diet is good if you are trying to lose weight, lower insulin levels, fight diabetes, lower blood sugar, etc. . But I'm 20 years old, 5'9 165lbs, that's not healthy for me. I am extremely active and need carbohydrates. In fact I definitely need more because I am lower than 12% body fat...

I pretty much do all of that with the exception of parchment paper. I tried telling them about the loose flower and they look at me like I'm being some controlling a**hole. I'm too poor to afford extra paper towels and parchment paper. I can't seem to get them to understand how serious it is. I d...

Vitamin deficiencies of vitamins D, C, and B12 and Calcium deficiency can all cause night sweats. (Perhaps the methyl form of B12 is needed for those with that MthFr gene.) Also, consistently high blood sugar levels can cause night sweats. As a type two diabetic, I find if my blood sugar...