No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

UK Food Standards Agency Seeks Public Comment on Gluten-free Labels in England


Photo: Screen Grab: CC--Andy Blackledge

Celiac.com 01/25/2017 - The UK's Food Standards Agency (FSA) has initiated a public comment period on gluten-free labeling in England.

The FSA is inviting industry feedback on the proposed Gluten In Food (Information for Consumers) (England) Regulations 2017. This regulation enforces the new European Union regulation (Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 828/2014), which standardizes labeling information on products that are gluten-free or very low in gluten.

The law does not require any change in formulation, ingredients or the methods for these products, but does mandate new wording for product labels. It also clarifies for consumers the difference between foods naturally free of gluten, and those specially formulated for people with gluten intolerance.

The proposed rule applies to England only, not Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. The rule change is, in part at least, a response to rising numbers of product complaints.

According to the FSA, approximately 1% of the UK population (around 600,000 people) suffers from celiac disease, while nearly half a million people remain undiagnosed.

Ads by Google:

Currently, food businesses are permitted to make voluntary gluten-free or low in gluten claims, but this has led to inconsistency and confusion in many cases. Such confusion could cause health problems for those who are gluten-intolerant.

Many of these products also fetch a premium price because of their gluten-free claims, stated the FSA.

The aim of the English regulation is to standardize the permitted claims about gluten. Manufacturers will be limited to the use of the words "gluten-free" or "very low gluten" along with clear and limited supporting information.

No other claims or descriptions are allowed, and products that fail to conform to labeling standards can be fined.

The previously accepted phrase "No gluten containing ingredients (NGCI)" can no longer be used on product labels.

Enforcement of FSA rules will take effect February 20, 2018.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Great so they are safe! Good because I bought a bag and jab been suffering with a sore throat so this will definitely soothe it. Thanks!

Hi Louie, Welcome to the forum! It's true, you probably are doing the gluten-free diet wrong. The gluten-free diet is a huge change for many people, and it can take sometime to learn it and how to avoid all the places gluten can hide in foods. Really I consider the first 6 months a be...

No that's a really good point mate. I'll amend my post also. Thanks for pointing it out

Just needed to point this out while it seems the UK and perhaps even Canada they are. The US McDonalds has wheat in the fries. Second thought in the US you have to a take more careful with CC and chains, the kids go in and out of these like crazy and think gluten free is a kind of fad. I would ...

I hope I'll be fine too.