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How Gluten-Free is Your Water?

Is your water gluten-free? It better be.


Is your water gluten-free? Photo: CC--Taro Taylor

Celiac.com 09/14/2017 - Is your water hip? Is your water cool? Is your water gluten-free? Does it say so on the label? Does it matter?

Gluten-free has become such a marketing buzzword that the words "gluten-free" are now appearing on all kinds of things that most certainly gluten-free, such as, yes, bottled water.

Would you be more likely to buy water labeled "gluten-free?" Would you feel safer? More nourished?

If the bottled water craze wasn't enough in itself, there is now the added marketing factor that turns plain, clean, pure bottled water into "premium" water that is not only gluten- and GMO-free, but also certified kosher and organic.

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Never mind that not a single drop in these bottle contains anything but plain water. Plain water, of course, is gluten-free, GMO-free, very much organic, and likely perfectly fine for kosher Jews.

Basically, labels should help people make informed decisions, not confuse them with useless marketing information.

Putting "gluten-free" labels on water likely doesn't help consumers make better decisions about the water they buy, it may just confuse people into believing (wrongly) that some water has, or might have, gluten in it; which is seriously unlikely.

So, in our world, where the catchphrase seems to be caveat emptor, or, buyer beware, it falls on us as consumers to be informed and to resist the empty marketing promises made by products like "gluten-free" water. What's next, a label that says: Guaranteed Wet!?

Got any good stories about confusing or useless "gluten-free" labels on products that clearly don't need them? Share them below.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












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1 Response:

 
DianeRMD
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Sep 2017 4:01:52 PM PDT
Yes! A few months ago, I found the term "gluten-free" on a 5-pound bag of white potatoes after I got it home from the store. Though I don't peel potatoes, I do wash them well before cooking. Too funny!




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Interesting article. I do wonder how she was 'misdiagnosed' though and how she came to the conclusion she wasn't celiac.

Try dropping the oats for while and see if that helps. Some of us, myself included, react to even the ones that are certified as gluten free.

Hey guys, I appreciate the input, you are all very sweet and kind. I do not eat out at all. Only eat food I cook. No alcohol. Only certified gluten-free oats, grains, rice, etc. I have 3 roommates in a little house. I have my own gluten-free section to cook and prepare foo...

What was your gluten free diet like? I wonder if, when you were gluten-free, you went more whole food, less processed food? Or did you continue to eat processed food that was just gluten free? One reason I ask is that I have cut way back on grains and processed foods like gluten-free bread, but o...

Equal parts Hershey Coco Powder and a sweetener with a pinch of salt. Super easy to make your own. I like adding a bit to my coffee with almond milk, and lakanto sugar free maple, or a bit of monk fruit or stevia. PS you might want to drop dairy milk. The enzymes to break it down come from th...