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Who Makes the Best Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread?

There are many companies who make gluten-free sandwich bread, but which one is the best?


Photo: CC--Johanna Alderson

Celiac.com 01/02/2018 - Sandwich lovers can get mighty particular about which breads make the best sandwich. There's plenty of room for opinion, and personal taste can include opinions on toasting versus non-toasting, seeded versus non-seeded, white versus whole grain, and on and on.

That means that this list of gluten-free sandwich breads is not meant to be authoritative. It is not written in stone. In fact, it is subject to revision based on input and suggestions by our readers.

That said, these are some of the stand-out gluten-free sandwich breads that we have tried.

Bread Srsly
Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, sorghum and arrowroot with a wild sourdough culture to deliver a tasty gluten-free classic with a delightful sourdough tang.

Okay, it's not pre-sliced, so technically it may not quality as sandwich bread, but I'm such a fan of Bread Srsly. Toast this bread up and it makes a lovely base for a sandwich. The tangy sourdough is perfect for ham, or tuna salad, or just a bout anything else you want on your sandwich. Breadsrsly.com

Canyon Bakehouse
Canyon Bakehouse makes a wide variety of gluten-free bread products. Canyon's gluten-free breads can also be stored at room temperature without becoming crumbly, making them perfect for sandwiches. Canyon. Breads are also excellent for grilled sandwiches. Certified GF, Dairy Free, Soy Free, Nut Free, Non GMO. Canyonglutenfree.com

Franz
Seattle favorite Franz bakery makes a respectable sandwich bread.
Franz makes gluten-free bread with a nice, chewy consistency that doesn't crumble, so you can make a sandwich with or without toasting. Great for lunches! Franzbakery.com

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Glutino 
Glutino gluten-free breads come in four styles: Cinnamon Raisin; Multigrain; Seeded and White. Glutino breads are light enough to eat right out of the bag. They also come in a nice, full size slices so you can make a proper sandwich. Glutino.com

Rudi's
Once found only in the frozen section, Rudi's now makes a soft, fluffy sliced bread that can be eaten right out of the bag.
Rudi's keeps it simple with just two varieties of gluten-free fresh sliced bread, Original and Multigrain. Both are perfect for sandwiches as is, but toast up nicely. RudisBakery.com

Schär
Schär uses top quality rice, corn or buckwheat, along with sorghum, a traditional African grain, or quinoa, to make its long-fermented gluten-free sourdough sliced loaves and baguettes.

Sourdough enzymes help the bread to stay fresh longer after baking, enrich the bread with vitamins, and eliminates the need for artificial preservatives. Schaer.com

Trader Joe's
Yes, Trader Joe's offers a gluten-free bread. Trader Joe's Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is dairy, soy, nut, and gluten-free. It's made with brown rice flour, teff (a grass cultivated for grain), whole grain amaranth, whole grain sorghum (also in the grass family, and cultivated for grain), tapioca, potato, and flaxseed meal.

According to Trader Joe's website, their Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is “lower in fat, with fewer calories than its big-brand counterpart.” Traderjoes.com

Three Bakers
Three Bakers gluten-free sliced sandwich bread comes in four varieties: White Bread Whole Grain; 7 Ancient Grain Whole Grain Bread; Rye Style Whole Grain Bread; and MAXOMEGA™ Whole Grain AND 5 Seed Bread. Threebakers.com

Udi's Gluten-Free White
Light, airy and fiber-rich, Udi's popular sandwich loaf bread is made with all natural ingredients without added fillers. Udisglutenfree.com

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14 Responses:

 
John
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said this on
02 Jan 2018 7:11:38 PM PST
I'm surprised BFree isn't on this list.

 
Ruslan
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said this on
08 Jan 2018 7:47:26 AM PST
Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, check following study: ´Antithyroid and goitrogenic effects of millet: role of C-glycosylflavones´. I would prefer to stay away from that Trader Joe's... flaxseed meal. Google ´flaxseed testosterone study´. And you'll see how it plays with hormones. Especially - testosterone. I would avoid that. Sadly the article is not helpful at all.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
12 Jan 2018 5:49:10 PM PST
Re: Millet--The study you site is a study about evidence that millet may play a role in the genesis of endemic goiter in areas where the population consumes low or absent rate of iodine. The study is about third-world areas and dietary problems resulting from low iodine. That scenario is simply unlikely to occur in the Untied States or any other developed country. Basically, it is not applicable to Americans.

 
Jefferson
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said this on
12 Jan 2018 5:55:20 PM PST
Regarding your comment to "Google flaxseed testosterone study." I'm afraid your scientific literacy needs some work. The main study that comes up is a case study--that means a single person. That study describes the impact of flaxseed supplementation (30 g/day) on hormonal levels in a 31-year old woman with PCOS. So, basically a single individual was eating up to an ounce of flaxseed per day, and experienced issues. Issues that may or may not be due to the flax consumption. A simple dietary levels, there is basically ZERO chance that flax will cause any issues, hormonal or otherwise. Flax and millet are both safe at basic dietary levels.

 
Jefferson
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said this on
12 Jan 2018 6:01:33 PM PST
Lastly, the patient cited in the flaxseed study was a women, not a man. Even if flaxseed were the cause, it is unlikely to impact men in the same way. At the end of the day, that single case study tells us nothing about the dietary safety of flax seed.

 
Liz
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said this on
08 Jan 2018 11:58:47 AM PST
Thanks for FINALLY including Trader Joe's!

 
Rosalyn
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said this on
08 Jan 2018 1:10:13 PM PST
I find Udi's to be overpriced and full of holes. Tastes better if toasted. Udi's frozen bagles don't slice evenly, and , of course, have to be defrosted before being sliced and toasted. Some of the breads recommended are not universally distributed. I would not recommend Udi's.

 
Marci
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said this on
08 Jan 2018 4:59:24 PM PST
I don't like Udi's at all, although it seems that they have a great sales rep in the Dallas area because most of the frozen GF bread space is taken up with it. I particularly like Canyon Bakehouse, especially the Heritage style which has larger slices. The whole grain version, however, has flax seed which I am allergic to. The honey white does not. I also like Three Bakers, but it is rather pricey and slices are small. I have never seen Srsly here.

 
Lara
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said this on
08 Jan 2018 6:46:37 PM PST
Breads baked from boxed flour by breadsfromanna.com are always overlooked when rating gluten free bread. Anna offers several varieties, which can be baked in the oven or in a GF bread machine. The first time I tasted it at her facility, it was a sandwich using fresh out-of-the- machine herb bread.

 
Jefferson
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said this on
12 Jan 2018 5:44:25 PM PST
Thanks for the tip!

 
Kiya
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said this on
09 Jan 2018 7:47:13 AM PST
For creating a proper hoagie (Philadelphia for Italian submarine sandwich), I have tried all of the brands available in this region. The only GF roll I have found that does not fall apart, leaving me with a bread salad, is the Schar baguette. They simulate a "real" Italian bread roll, and maintains shape. Better yet, the packaging allows it to be kept for months, and refreshed as needed by putting in the oven for a few minutes (not necessary).

 
jwoolman
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said this on
09 Jan 2018 4:20:43 PM PST
I really like Happy Camper. They're small slices but sturdy, sort of a GF version of Dave's Killer Bread. And no egg, which is an allergen for me. BFree products are good also.

 
JaredM
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said this on
10 Jan 2018 9:48:36 AM PST
I agree that Udi's often has annoying holes in it. However, I like the texture of the bread. In my experience, it holds up well with a light toasting when making a "dagwood" type sandwich. The flavor isn't outstanding, but also not objectionable. It's better than any white bread I used to eat. The other advantage of Udi's is that if you buy it from Costco, you can get the larger loaves. They are as wide as Oroweat and provide lots of slices. Most other GF breads come in tiny loaves that are impractical for sandwiches. I don't want a sandwich that only lasts for three bites!

 
Michael Mann
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said this on
10 Jan 2018 2:03:05 PM PST
I find Schar's breads to be somewhat pasty, the way rice/tapioca breads are. And while I really like the offerings from Udi's (a lot of variety) they have for years suffered from huge gas bubbles in the loaf, which make it look like mice have eaten out sections ranging from marble to golf ball plus size. Which can mean four or six slices are only useful as "halves". It is wonderful that there is so much variety in pre-made GF bread these days, at all.




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