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Ennis_TX

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As I mentioned I had some random vomiting.....well fact is it has been happening since my gluten exposure back November. It was almost every night around the same time 3-5 hours after eating dinner. After my exposure last month it became more consistent almost every night same time....but it is not really like vomiting.....just burping up 2-8 mouthfuls averaging about 6 starts off with a slime mucus, then floating stuff, then a couple of globs of compacted foods. The globs consist of things even from breakfast up to  10 hours prior bits and pieces sort of compacted into a mucus covered glob not much just some of it.
It is not intolerance as a intolerance will have me vomiting within a 2 hour window normally within 30mins of consuming the offending food.
It is not a allergy as I have no fever, sores, etc.
It is not gluten as I have no pain, nerve, or gut issues with it.
This reminds me of my pancreas enzyme issues years ago with meats coming up this same way if taken without enzymes....so I upped my enzymes, no effect.

My next thought was this might be a PH issue like Posterboy suggested so I started betain HCL....burned a bit more but still had them.

I then started changing up my dinner and had my breakfast for dinner.....well it just set on quicker this way happening within hour of eating and much more....but breakfast normally consist of solid foods and dinner is always blended and mushy for ease of digestion (used to make it sure I would keep foods down) Trying a blended breakfast back to same thing. But eating same breakfast for breakfast no issues....time of day seems the be the factor not the food eaten.

I tried stopping my supplements and medications for a few nights...well bunch of issues came back up and I was a zombie in a chair but still had the same timing effects with the burping/vomiting (I was still on my PPI)

Next I tried just removing my PPIs.....yeah I was just married to a trashcan for 12 hours CONSTANTLY burping up acid....confirmed I still have that pump issues from the overdose as a kid where my pumps never turn off.

I have 2 thought lines now. 1 as the day goes on I just get worse and worse stomach issues and the gut fails to dump in the evenings without a reset sleep cycle?
2. This reminds me of owl pellets where a owl pukes up the undigested foods.....as this seems almost exactly what I am dealing with, hard and undigested foods from the whole day get puked up....dissecting my globs and taste analysis of what I am puking confirms some foods even from my last meal never show up in the globs.....but others are present in some form even the safest of foods....I tried a elimination diet of the foods in the globs but then it changed to other foods.....this is odd with no consultancies other then time it happens.

Oh last week I went all day with blended porridge,.....still forming glob?! Like my stomach is churning these out of the food from each meal it just does not want to digest and lets them harden then coughs them up when done at the end of the day.

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Perhaps you might want to look into Eosinophilic Esophagitis.  Those food globs that are from previous meals might have been stuck in your esophagus.  Trying to lie down causes painful GERD like feeling , but definately small "burp" vomitting is a symptom.

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What you are describing is called gastroparesis I think.  Basically the digestive process is somewhat frozen.  Causes can very.  But most likely there is some irritation to the digestive system that is causing it not to move normally.  When  this happened to me in the past I switched to my safe diet of only 5 foods.  Then after digestion recovered added one new food in a day.

Have you checked the side affects of your meds to see if they include digestive symptoms?  Some meds can cause digestive problems.

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You might try mint tea. If you have delayed stomach emptying it speeds up the process by relaxing the stomach mussels. It could also make the symptoms worse though.

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Update, it has been improving with less coming up, only action I have really taken was fooling around with forcing it to dump by tricking it with massive dose of HCL supplments...but it really just dumped and had D then so playing with the dosing still and adjusting magnesium, enzymes etc....I think this is just going to be a time issue of my stomach/gut to heal more...I mean solid food still has to be blended before consuming it right now or I get issues. Funny as I am cooking meals, omelettes, etc.....then putting them in bowl and blending them with a hand blender and eating with a spoon...what can I say I love cooking funny eating 2-6 bowls of different flavored pureed dishes.... I bet babies wish they had food this flavorful.
Trying solids next week again, I am thinking steam pouched baked swai til it melts with a sauce of nori, coconut aminos for a light asian flavor. Maybe one of those muffins in my freezer....only had one so far blended into my eggs last week and it was good...going to enjoy eating it as a english muffin lol.

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I was diagnosed 2 yrs ago with colon cancer and celiacs. I choose not to do chemo and went on strict diet and supplements.  My diet for celiacs and cancer fight each other. I need to eat lots of veggies but i get pretty sick cause my stomach is so sensative from celiacs. I am gluten free but still have lots of bloating and soreness. I go to bed every night sick. I have been doing both diets on my own. 2 yrs of research and still feel like im scratching the surface. Anyone in the same boat as me? Any suggestions?

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8 hours ago, Vickie von said:

I was diagnosed 2 yrs ago with colon cancer and celiacs. I choose not to do chemo and went on strict diet and supplements.  My diet for celiacs and cancer fight each other. I need to eat lots of veggies but i get pretty sick cause my stomach is so sensative from celiacs. I am gluten free but still have lots of bloating and soreness. I go to bed every night sick. I have been doing both diets on my own. 2 yrs of research and still feel like im scratching the surface. Anyone in the same boat as me? Any suggestions?

Hi, Vickie this post was actually my personal blog post on this site, and some issues I am dealing with after a recent gluten exposure has caused some digestive troubles. You should start a new thread on the main forum. Cancer is a serious issue if you wish to try a natural treatment that is your choice, try rotating your veggies, you might have a sensitivity them, keeping a food diary also. I can not eat iceberg for months without a extreme urge vomit. NOW to make veggies easier on the gut try steaming them to mush and blending them (the water used is chock full of the vitamins and great) I have recently turned to drying out and mortar and pedestal grinding kale into a powder and using it foods, and using morning powder. You can get dehydrated kale or rythem kale chips and grind them this way and use in broths, soups or shakes. I know one company that sells dehydrated veggies you could grind into powders and then blend and make soups with, blended soups with say turmeric, coconut milk, butternut squash, curry paste, ginger, and kale used to be one of my staples before my carb issues. Try taking digestive enzymes with your meals to help you break them down, I use Jarrow Enzymes Plus for this. Aloe vera inner fillet is good for soothing the intestines, marshmallow root, slippery elm, also help star anise is good for gas.

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