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kadege

Dealing With The Effects Of Fad Dieters...

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A few days ago I went to lunch with a few coworkers to celebrate a birthday. We went to an Italian place that had mostly pastas and pizzas with a few (gross sounding) salads. Obviously, my options were super limited, so I asked the waitress if they had any gluten-free options, and she goes, "Of course! How gluten free are you?" and started describing this "great" pasta they had with low gluten .... I explained to her that I was VERY MUCH gluten free, and ended up with a nice (actually) gluten free pasta dish that didn't make me sick, but it was a little frustrating. I feel like if I lead with saying "I have celiac disease" I'm going to make myself sound pretentious, but obviously just asking for "gluten free" doesn't do the trick. Anyone have any tips for ordering in restaurants without making the waiter want to spit in your food?

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Just tell them that for you, gluten-free is a medical necessity. Sometimes I tell waiters/waitresses I have a severe allergy even though we know celiac is not an allergy. Most people don't understand autoimmune diseases but they do understand allergies. Whatever it takes to get them to take me seriously.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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I hear you on not wanting to sound pretentious however I had to get over that real quick. I tend to say I have Celiac, and to treat is as though it is a severe allergy because I get super sick for a couple of weeks. That usually does the trick :) Most of the time restaruants are more than willing to help you out if you are upfront and plesent about your issue, my glutenings have gown down significantly with this approach.

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I find that going to talk to the waiter privately after placing the order, and telling him then that I have Celiac disease but didn't want to make a fuss at the table gives me credibility because I am obviously NOT doing it for attention or to make any sort of point to my friends like a fad dieter might (whether the people at the table know or not is irrelevant).  I've always gotten good responses, promises to tell the chef to cook the food in a separate pan or clean the grill (all necessary but not always done) when I do that.  That doesn't mean that I've never gotten sick after, but I also have microscopic colitis, so my food issues are deeper and wider than just gluten.  

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I have come across that same "how gluten free are you" question myself."  Actually it was a good thing as it alerted me to the fact that a restaurant may not be quite as careful if they thought I was a "fad" gluten free diner.  Now I always just state that I am an extremely sensitive celiac and appreciate the extra care they would give in preventing cross contamination.  I don't like calling attention to myself either so I just try to make my statement all part of my order so to speak.  I believe that as celiacs we must speak up.  We often dine out with friends who are gluten free as they are both gluten intolerant and so can handle a little cross contamination.  I just smile and state my case! 

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I tell the waitress that I'm not doing the gluten free diet by choice, but out of actual medical necessity, so to please let the kitchen know so that they can take necessary precautions.


~Ruth

Gluten free since 2/14/2010 after suffering a rare and serious complication from my gluten challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

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