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JacobDO77

Leaky Gut / Intestinal Barrier Impairment Help

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The terms Leaky Gut Syndrome and Intestinal Barrier Impairment are used to describe a condition that allows larger, undigested food molecules, bacteria and toxins to migrated through the gut lining, into the blood stream.  This condition occurs when the mucus lining in the gut thins, or is missing. This condition can occur when the unprotected gut lining is attacked by bacterial, toxins and  pathogens.

The mucus lining of the gut is a physical barrier, against bacteria and dietary allergens that prevents damage to the gut lining.  The mucus also prevents the onset of inflammatory reactions, against bacteria and allergens that are present in the gut. The anti-inflammatory mucus also protects and lubricates the stomach and intestinal lining.

Every study that has been done on Intestinal barrier impairment, or IBS  indicates that there are two culprits that cause the onset of Intestinal Barrier Impairment.  The first condition is called Hypochlorhydria.  Hypochlorhydria is the reduction in the strength of the Hydrochloric acid produced, by the gut's parietal cells. This condition allows bacteria, intestinal parasites, like Candida and H. Pylori and other pathogens, to proliferate in the gut and attack the gut lining. Hypochlorhydria also allows unsterilized and unconverted protein to enter the small bowel, resulting in allergic reactions. Hypochlorhydria also inhibits the production of  gastric mucus.

Hypochlorhydria will cause allergies, reflux, abdominal pain, gas, bloating, constipation and/or diarrhea, nausea, flatulence, heartburn, fatigue, headaches and weight gain.

The second condition that effects the mucus barrier is H2 antagonist. An H2 antagonist, or H2 blocker is any substance, or drug that reduces, or inhibits the secretion of gastric acid. Two of the most common H2 antagonist are PPIs, (proton pump inhibitors) and Antibiotics.  Antihistamines and mucus reducing drugs can also cause the reduction of  gastric acid secretion and reduce mucus production, in the gut. When the acid production is inhibited, the condition is called Hypochlorhydria, in extreme instances it is called Achlorhydria.

The symptoms associated with IBS can be treated with natural remedies like high fiber diets, peppermint oils, Probiotics, or drugs.  However, the underlying cause, Hypochlorhydria, that has not been corrected, as part of the overall treatment, will result in reoccurrence of the condition. Anyone experiencing IBS, Leaky Gut, or Intestinal Barrier Impairment should get a pH diagnostic test, pH Capsule test, or pH Gastrogram test,  and have the unbalanced condition in the digestive process corrected, before treating the symptoms. 

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Is this standard of care?  It sounds promising but not sure how to talk to the MD about it.  I was ridiculed with the mention of  leaky gut so not sure what to do with all this information.

Thank you for your post.

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5 hours ago, JacobDO77 said:

The terms Leaky Gut Syndrome and Intestinal Barrier Impairment are used to describe a condition that allows larger, undigested food molecules, bacteria and toxins to migrated through the gut lining, into the blood stream.  This condition occurs when the mucus lining in the gut thins, or is missing. This condition can occur when the unprotected gut lining is attacked by bacterial, toxins and  pathogens.

The mucus lining of the gut is a physical barrier, against bacteria and dietary allergens that prevents damage to the gut lining.  The mucus also prevents the onset of inflammatory reactions, against bacteria and allergens that are present in the gut. The anti-inflammatory mucus also protects and lubricates the stomach and intestinal lining.

Every study that has been done on Intestinal barrier impairment, or IBS  indicates that there are two culprits that cause the onset of Intestinal Barrier Impairment.  The first condition is called Hypochlorhydria.  Hypochlorhydria is the reduction in the strength of the Hydrochloric acid produced, by the gut's parietal cells. This condition allows bacteria, intestinal parasites, like Candida and H. Pylori and other pathogens, to proliferate in the gut and attack the gut lining. Hypochlorhydria also allows unsterilized and unconverted protein to enter the small bowel, resulting in allergic reactions. Hypochlorhydria also inhibits the production of  gastric mucus.

Hypochlorhydria will cause allergies, reflux, abdominal pain, gas, bloating, constipation and/or diarrhea, nausea, flatulence, heartburn, fatigue, headaches and weight gain.

The second condition that effects the mucus barrier is H2 antagonist. An H2 antagonist, or H2 blocker is any substance, or drug that reduces, or inhibits the secretion of gastric acid. Two of the most common H2 antagonist are PPIs, (proton pump inhibitors) and Antibiotics.  Antihistamines and mucus reducing drugs can also cause the reduction of  gastric acid secretion and reduce mucus production, in the gut. When the acid production is inhibited, the condition is called Hypochlorhydria, in extreme instances it is called Achlorhydria.

The symptoms associated with IBS can be treated with natural remedies like high fiber diets, peppermint oils, Probiotics, or drugs.  However, the underlying cause, Hypochlorhydria, that has not been corrected, as part of the overall treatment, will result in reoccurrence of the condition. Anyone experiencing IBS, Leaky Gut, or Intestinal Barrier Impairment should get a pH diagnostic test, pH Capsule test, or pH Gastrogram test,  and have the unbalanced condition in the digestive process corrected, before treating the symptoms. 

You are obviously copying and pasting - please reference your sources.


 

 

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Dr. A. Fasano  (leading celiac researcher/GI afflicted with Harvard University/Mass General Hospital -- bio:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alessio_Fasano

and his team discovered Zonulin a decade ago or so.    They think that zonulin are the little gatekeepers of the gut.  You can read about it here:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21248165

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384703/

or watch a video: 

But......Dr. Fasano (in a nutshell) stated that we do not really know how the gut works.  There is some exciting reasearch, theories, and lots of possibilities -- that's it.  There are no tests or cures for a leaky gut (he really does not like that terminology, but it fits).  

Most of the  information on leaky gut you can find on the web has never been proven.   Many sites are preying upon sick people.  Let's face it, they want your MONEY!

Here is my opinion and I am not a doctor:

  Leaky gut may be real.  It certainly might explain why so many of us have common or unique intolerances to various foods.  It might explain many autoimmune disorders.  It might link gluten to other illnesses.   Leaky gut might be the root cause of intolerances, allergies, immune responses, but there is no solution (other than avoidances those foods that make trigger symptoms, like gluten) at this time.  

So, keep searching for medical news from reliable sources.  There is no magic pill or cure, but maybe someday!  

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

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