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JamieAR

Allergy test confusion, need help

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I have been gluten-free per doctor recommendation for 2 years now. Since I was still having stomach problems, I went in for allergy testing. It came back as:

Highly reactive: wheat, malt, yogurt

Moderately reactive: barley, cows milk, mushrooms, cottage cheese, mozzarella, kelp, sesame, ginger

Mildly reactive: green beans, chicken, sunflower, cheddar cheese, safflower

I have never gone through official celiac testing; I simply followed the doctor's orders to rid myself of gluten and see if it helped. It helped tremendously, but I still had stomach issues, unexplained fevers, and fatigue a couple of times a month. Thus the allergy testing.

My question is, is everything labeled "gluten free" also malt and barley free? Are there hidden places I should be cautious of sesame, ginger, or the other allergens? I'm willing to eliminate anything...I just want to feel better consistently.

Also, I have three kids who don't currently seem to have issues. How hereditary are these problems? 

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"Gluten-Free" is a regulated term in Canada and the USA. It refers to wheat, rye, and barely content. 

It does not specifically refer to "malt" since, while most malt is from barley, other grains can be malted without resulting in gluten content. Your allergist is wrong if he says "malt" is an issue. Wheat is gluten; yoghurt is dairy; but "malt" is not specific. You may react to certain things when malted.  But it depends on what the malt is made from.

If it says "gluten-free" it does not contain wheat, barley or rye. Other top allergens are are listed in FALCPA, which came into effect in 2006.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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That is some odd allergy testing.  I don't get the separating the dairy?  Are you supposed to be allergic to the protein in dairy?  Then  it would be for all dairy.

 

like Peter said, "malt" isn't a thing to be allergic to.  Usually, foods with " malt" say  " barley malt".  Like a malted milk ball has barley malt.  But your "allergy test" should say an allergy to barley not malt.  

 

Sorry to say, I think you wasted your money on those " tests".  


 

 

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Welcome to the board. It is too bad your 'doctor' didn't test you for celiac before telling you to go gluten free.  Since he was neglectful in that respect chances are he didn't tell you all you need to do to keep yourself safe IF you have celiac.  Since you have children and celiac is hereditary you should consider going back to eating gluten and getting tested.  Chances are good that you are not as gluten free as you think you may be and that would be what causes you to still have periodic issues.  That is especially the case if you have other folks in your home that are still eating gluten.  It was very irresponsible of your doctor to simply tell you to go gluten free without testing and giving you the full info after diagnosis to keep you safe.  He virtually guarenteed that you will still have periodic issues so he could charge you for an 'allergy' test . As other posters mentioned the results of that allergy testing are very strange and IMHO should be ignored for now.  Please consider going back on gluten, a couple slices of bread a day should be enough, and get tested by a real MD in a couple months. Meanwhile do read the Newbie 101 thread so that you will know what you need to do to keep yourself safe if those tests come back positive. Also be very cautious with any herbals or supplements that 'doctor' may have prescribed.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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