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Kelly D

Blood results help

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I had a blood test  (TTG IGA) done this week because I have symptoms of celiac. My result was 
- Out of range 5 H

(<4 = negative)
From what I can tell the 5 means a weak positive and the H means high IGA. Do you know if I am reading this correctly? Does this indicate celiac or no? I do not currently have insurance so I do not have a doctor to look at my lab test. I am willing to do more blood work if necessary but can not afford biopsy. Thank you in advance for any help!

Edited by Kelly D

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If the report says 5 is weak positive then it's weak positive. H (high) appears for anything other than negative. I'd recommend you get the full celiac panel done. It includes:

TTG IGA

TTG IGG

DGP IGA

DGP IGG

EMA

IGA

A high on any one should lead to an endoscopy (biopsy). Technically you already have a high. But a weak positive can be caused by other issues. You should really visit a gastroenterologist.

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Thank you for your response! 

My report didn't say a weak positive, I have read online that other say a 5 would equal that.

My report says

<4 - NO Antibody Detected

>4 - Antibody Detected

I am going back to the lab in the morning and will try to get more of these test done you've listed.

I did the TTG IGA already, if I can't afford to get all of the others what would you say would be the most important?

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The whole set costs $298 at the lab I go to. People react to different tests so no one test is better than the others.

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These are the lab results I have had done.

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Here are all my lab results...

Would you agree that I do not have celiac?

My mom did just test moderately sensitive to glaidins but that would have show up in my test if I was sensitive right?

0C0F548D-8F35-4B79-862B-B34261B0CA92.thumb.jpg.c593f1ab806fb9fb7a3a82c1ba76e24a.jpg

AF692912-70D8-48A0-8BFF-B03536CA53AD.jpg

Edited by Kelly D
More clear picture

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I'm not a doc. I can see why you think you don't have celiac from that. If I couldn't afford the biopsy and had those numbers I'd probably retest the high one in a few months and see if it goes up or down. If I had gastro symptoms I'd try strict gluten free and see if the symptoms went away in a couple of months then reintroduce gluten and see if they came back.

 

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If I retest in a few months would I  remove gluten until then or continue eating gluten?  Thank you again for all your advice! 

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Retesting is a option you should get the biopsy but I understand it if not covered in insurance and too expensive. On a side note there is a a condition called NCGS (Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity) that several of our members have. They have many of the symptoms of the disease but test negative to it. They might come in here later and give you some more information on it I did a little write up on it you can review. If gluten makes you feel bad you can try try removing it completely as if you tested positive and see how you feel. You could have NCGS.

1. Acne, Flushed Skin, or Rashes
Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity can manifest itself as a chronic skin condition such as a rash, acne, or red/flushed cheeks, but these conditions could also be hormonal. On the other hand Celiac disease also has Dermatitis herpetiformic or DH, which is characterized by rashes and chronically itchy, elbows, knees, buttons, and back.

2. Distended Stomach or Bloating
A distended or bloated stomach applies especially after gluten consumption and is a fairly clear sign of gluten sensitivity. A distended stomach is also characteristic of malnutrition as well of celiac disease.

3. Diarrhea, Gas, or Constipation
These three  symptoms can simultaneously occur after eating gluten and may be a sign of intolerance because, especially the former, is a way for the body to expel harmful allergens or other substances. Often, diarrhea (frequent loose or liquid stools) occurs with gas, resulting in a “feeling of a full or tight abdomen” as put by the NFCA. Constipation, essentially the antithesis of diarrhea, is also a symptom of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and is characterized by infrequent, hard, painful bowel movements from lack of physical activity or poor diet, namely a diet high in refined carbs rich in gluten. This can be made worse if one has a magnesium deficiency, does not get though hard fiber, or drink enough water. All of which can be made worse by the feeling of bloat/gas making one feel too full to need to drink or eat high fiber foods.

4. Brain Fog or Migraines
Brain fog is a major characteristic of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Chronic or debilitating migraines goes hand in hand with the idea of brain fog and results in depression or irritability. These again can be made worse by deficiency, like B-vitamins.

5. Joint Pain or Numbness in Extremities
Tingling, pain, or numbness in the joints or extremities is abnormal and should be a clear sign of a health problem like gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Colloquially, this tingling is described as “pins and needles” or a limb being “asleep.” If this happens frequently for no apparent reason, it could be a sign of gluten intolerance. Again these can help be alleviated and be made worse by deficiency in Magnesium, B-vitamins


Total elimination of the gluten protein for an extended period of time, say two weeks or a month, is the only true way to identify if these symptoms are linked to gluten intolerance, and even then, it would not be certain. If the protein is eliminated and any of the above symptoms dissipate, then it should be noted that gluten intolerance may be an issue, but be sure to consult a professional for solid proof.

 

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You have a positive on the TTG IGA. The fact that it's not off the charts high is irrelevant. The only thing that matters is that it is positive. A positive is a positive is a positive. Period. Just like you can't be a little bit pregnant. You either are pregnant or you're not pregnant.

This result would, by medical standards set forth for diagnosing celiac, be enough to move to the endoscopic biopsy. Now I understand that you don't have insurance so you're really in a bind as far as the biopsies go but I did want to point out the fact that just because a result isn't high by a great number, that does not diminish the fact that it IS indeed positive. 

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3 hours ago, Kelly D said:

Here are all my lab results...

Would you agree that I do not have celiac?

My mom did just test moderately sensitive to glaidins but that would have show up in my test if I was sensitive right?

0C0F548D-8F35-4B79-862B-B34261B0CA92.thumb.jpg.c593f1ab806fb9fb7a3a82c1ba76e24a.jpg

AF692912-70D8-48A0-8BFF-B03536CA53AD.jpg

Everyone is unique.  You might not test the same as your Mom.  You might be developing celiac disease or you might have another autoimmune disorder or the test could just be a false positive. Of course,  getting to a GI is part of the normal process when seeking a diagnosis of celiac disease.   I understand that you do not have insurance.  You have two options: go gluten free and re-test in three to six months or continue to eat gluten and re-test to see if the TTG results change.  

You sound young, is there a reason you can not obtain health insurance?  Can you qualify for Medicaid?  Qualify for National Health Care Insurance which can be subsidized?  Enrollment occurs sometime in November and you might want to consider all your options.  

We really can not help you with a diagnosis as we are not doctors.  We do not know you or your medical background.    If your Mom has had positives on the DGP, has she been diagnosed by a doctor?  Perhaps you could visit her doctor.  Negotiate a cash discount.   I would hate for you to overlook another autoimmune disorder  that would require medication (e.g. Thyroid replacement, insulin, etc.).  

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3 hours ago, Kelly D said:

If I retest in a few months would I  remove gluten until then or continue eating gluten?  Thank you again for all your advice! 

If I did not have symptoms I'd keep eating gluten and redo the tests in three months. If I did have symptoms I'd go extremely strict gluten free for two months, retest, then eat gluten for two months, retest. That way I could see what happens to the symptoms and the numbers. Strict gluten free means no cheating or "oops" moments for 8 solid weeks in a row.

But the best would be the biopsy.

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5 minutes ago, cyclinglady said:

I would hate for you to overlook another autoimmune disorder  that would require medication (e.g. Thyroid replacement, insulin, etc.).

Great point here.

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