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LilyR

Looking for a diet...

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Hi everyone. I don't have celiac (tested low positive, then they did more bloodwork and said I instead have a gluten sensitivity).   Last summer I found out and I started going gluten-free.  It took about two months and then I did start to feel better.  But then things seem to get iffy, sometimes a little better, sometimes not.  And now I've had a few months of the bad bloat (stomach distention) and my sides and ribs sometimes ache.  Once in a while a little stomach pain.  I am trying to avoid soy and corn.  Right now I think I'd like to try an elimination diet or something, so even giving up dairy.  I just need to figure out what's bothering me.  Even vitamin supplements is getting frustrating.  My dr said I need folic acid right now and I found one a pharmacist said should be okay, but now not sure if one ingredient could be from corn, so just stopped taking that.  I hope none of my prescriptions are bothering me because dr's do not seem very helpful if you think one might be.  

Can anyone suggest a website or diet plan that is pretty basic and shows what foods to eat and what to avoid?  And any meal plan ideas, recipes, etc.  and also please keep in mind that for me, my grocery budget is very tight. Things are getting stressful. I am looking for simple. Thing is, I don't even know if certain fruits and veggies might bother me due to fiber, perhaps?  I love beans, but I hear iffy things about those. I would at some point also like to try an anti-inflammatory diet, but not sure if I can handle even more restrictions yet.  So thought I could try a basic elimination diet first, and then see what bothers me.  Then eventually try also eliminating foods that cause inflammation (my inflammation has been high for a long time now).  

I felt so happy last fall when my stomach seemed to be getting back to normal after going gluten-free.  It is upsetting to see it getting issues again, and I feel more confused than ever.  I started taking a beta blocker back in January and I have hated how I feel on it (hate how I feel in every way on that stuff).  I am not sure, but I am wondering if my blood pressure and pulse is more connected to food than I realized.  I have noticed some days when my stomach is at its worst, my pulse and blood pressure can get very high.   Even on all these meds (I'm on two other blood pressure pills too).  So before I go back to the dr complaining about the beta blocker, I was hoping to start this elimination diet to see how it affects my stomach, but also see if it affects my blood pressure and pulse at all.  

Any meal plans also would be greatly appreciated - inexpensive though. Thanks for any suggestion, or any advice, or sharing any experiences you have had with all this.  It sure does seem to take a lot of detective work, and sadly, sometimes it feels like the dr's don't care to help that much.  What gets me is they give you an attitude if you question if a prescription could possibly be bothering your stomach, as if that is out of the question. Really? Something as simple and basic as bread bothers me.  Corn bothers me. The sun bothers me. But yet the thought that a chemical or ingredient in these medications (especially the generics with their cheaper fillers) could bother me is not likely, in their eyes??  I feel about ready to go batty.  

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We are all different but I went with a paleo basis, then more of a keto/atkins diet. This removes grains, beans, corn, starches, etc. and goes to a more basic human diet our ancestors would have eaten. My particular take removed sugars, fruits, and potatoes also, but tons of protein so not quite keto. The lack of carbs, sugars, helped with inflammation, gas, and bloat. I adapted it more to use less meat and more nut/seed/egg/avocado/fish but I had to do that for my pancreas and enzyme issues with meats. Though I do cook a lot for people with meats.

Diet plans look up stuff like Ketogenic Girl, mariaemmerich , etc.

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Like Ennis, I'm doing a modified paleo/keto diet. I do eat a lot of fruit though, but no dairy (except butter for cooking), no grains, no beans and no potatoes. I don't eat soy or eggs either. Lots of veggies, meat, seeds and fruit. An easy way to start this diet is to follow the Whole30 program (just google "Whole30" and a bunch of sites will come up with clear instructions and meal plans). 

I don't know if it's the diet itself or the fact that I've been gluten-free for about three months, but I have lost the bloat all over my body. My ankles, which have been swollen for years with no explanation from doctors, finally look like actual ankles again (I probably notice this the most because it's been a problem for so long). HTH!

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Thanks for the suggestions.  This might be harder than I thought.  I was hoping to do rice and potatoes.  I was eating those when I started to feel better for a while, and thought they were okay.  I eat eggs too.  I am getting to the point where I don't know what to eat. Chicken and some veggies, but what else?  I was going to try and eat veggies and a little fruit that seem to be less gassy.  At one point a dr gave me a hand-out on foods for IBS, but I eventually threw it out because another dr told me the didn't think I needed to worry about that. But now I am thinking to try that again because foods that cause less bloating couldn't hurt any. Between brain fog and a very tight grocery budget, and conflicting things from dr's I've seen and diet plans I read, this is not fun.  But needs to be done.  I will really miss coffee with cream and sugar!  Through the past year with all these problems I would tell my husband it's all okay as long as I can still enjoy that, lol!  And now....  ( :( )  

Do peas bother either of you?  Like fresh or frozen, or also the dried split peas?  I have a ham bone in the freezer and didn't know if a split pea soup with some carrots and onion in it too would be bad or not.  

Also, I read some things months ago on here that bone broths are good?  Would those be okay?  And veggie soups?  (I just will miss adding some rice, or some beans to the soups....I used to even use barley or noodles in some of my soups before going no gluten, but no beans, that is sad, and no potatoes or rice).  

I'm going to go look at some of those links you both gave me and see if I can figure out a weekly meal plan.  Thanks. 

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Oh, and Chrissy B, I used to retain a lot of water too, and in my ankles.  And going gluten-free, mine got better too. Although now on a beta blocker, I notice I am retaining some water more again.  Not as bad though as when I was eating gluten, and not as constant.  It's weird what gluten can do.  One dr said it could have been causing a lot of my aches and stiffness too.  I'd be curious to see if my inflammation eventually goes down, once I get this diet under control.  My sed rate is always very high. 

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Peas are lentils if I recall, I have problems with green peas, removed them years ago, but no issues with pea protein -_- I think it is the sugars and carbs. But they are known to cause gas, bloating.

Bone Broth while great for most gut issues, if you have a food histamine issue...it is the worst, try a cup of plain bone broth if you get issues you know you have a histamine issue with foods. I love using Jarrows instant bone broth with soups and ramen dishes with no carb noodles. I did a post on it as a bullion replacement. PS if histamine is a issue consider this list http://www.histamineintolerance.org.uk/about/the-food-diary/the-food-list/

Carbs, starches, sugars, fruit, potatoes, etc. Can make water retention and gas worse. Sort of why I suggest the lower carb approach with a research on Paleo meals with emphasis on Keto/Atkins. Basing on meats, leafy greens, healthy fats like avocado, fish, meats, nut butters, seed butters. Watch processed foods and sodium as this will make you swell up.

Onions, garlic, etc. Are known issues with IBS and gas...I love the hell out of them....but they and my gut have their differences, I always have to cut back to 1/4 the amount used in a recipe for my guts sake if I am eating it, OR I just eat 1/4 serving and call it a treat.

Coffee, a great treat, I use Christopher bean coffee....they make every dessert flavor you can imagine, I sweeten with stevia or splenda zero to avoid the sugars, and when I need cream a bit of coconut or cashew milk....the coconut pairs great with say chocolate flavors for a german chocolate twist (seriously 2 tbsp nestle or Hershey cocoa powder, few squirts of spenda zero in a glass of coconut milk unsweetened like silk)

If you can eat pork your blessed, nice pork butt roast crockpot style shred that sucker and use it with different seasonings for a week....I was sad when I found 12lb butt at the store for $20 and realized could not eat it...still thinking of doing a chef job with it lol. Pork loin was also dirt cheap I got some of that last week and did catered meals for 2 people for 5 days off one loin doing veggie or noodle stir fries rotating miracle noodles, miracle rice, broccoli, and bell peppers.  (I have plenty of pictures, should I PM you the cooking pages I did?). I found a marinade/cooking sauce blend that worked great for it if you need the recipe for Asian style pork stir fry.

I have list of low carb veggies and the stats on them so you can try to use that for avoiding gas, but you need to also get a food dairy and try them to find ones that flare up your IBS. We are all a bit different in tolerances with our guts.....people say coffee and cocoa are bad....I have no issues with them but the common culprits of to much spice, garlic, onion all make be quite uncomfortable, and sugars, alcohol are absolute NOs to me partially for my UC. https://ketosummit.com/low-carb-vegetables-list

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I have no idea if I have histamine issues. This is confusing me even more.  I looked up a few elimination diets and find some that say you can eat one food, but another diet will say you can't eat that food.  I have no idea what to eat.  And the histamine thing mentions eating fresh chicken, fresh meat, etc. yet pretty much all the chicken I buy at the store, I think it might have been previously frozen. This is making my head spin. How do you all do it? The more I look into all this, the more hopeless I am feeling, rather than feeling more informed and prepared.  The one good thing is hopefully the elimination diet will help me see what bothers me, and help me feel better.  But also hoping I will be able to introduce at least some foods back in that perhaps don't bother me.  So it's getting through a good four weeks or so on this limited diet - to start with anyway.  And then hopefully I will indeed be able to add  few more foods back in. 

Some plans are saying rice is okay, and rice noodles. Some plans say no rice.  It's confusing. I am giving up spices once I start this diet, except for fresh for now because I need to see if Mc Cormicks bothers me or not. And then if specific spices bother me or not.  A while ago I was infusing oil with garlic, but not eating garlic whole, as that was on some papers I got about bloat.  It said garlic infused oil was okay, but actual garlic was not. That makes me wonder about garlic powder and dried minced garlic too. I'll have to experiment with that.  I'll give it all up while doing the elimination diet though.  I have seen onions as okay on some diets, and not okay on others.  I have seen nuts okay in some, but mostly not okay on most other elimination diets I've looked up. I have even seen avocado mentioned as a no-no on some of the diets. 

 I am having the hardest time right now trying to make a weekly meal plan that is within the elimination diet plan, also an affordable meal plan, and for my family too (although I don't care if they add stuff to theirs that I can't, like if I make chicken and they want to add a bbq sauce or something to theirs).  

I found this website: https://www.precisionnutrition.com/elimination-diet

And as you scroll down it has a chart of food you can and cannot eat.  I guess then I plan meals of just the approved fruits, veggies, turkey, chicken, I love lamb  but that's too pricey so that's out.  I can occasionally get fish but it's pricey and so that will not be often (and some of the diet plans say no seafood, so...???).  Anyone know if fresh bass from the lake is okay, because my husband could bring home plenty of that.  Not sure if that is considered a healthy fish because you rarely hear people mention they had bass (especial lake, not sea bass).  I am wondering if canned salmon is okay on an elimination diet because my daughter and I love making salmon patties.  Oh wait. I add an egg to that.  Ugh!  Well, maybe plain canned salmon or tuna with sliced avocado with it? I don't know.  And that's assuming I allow myself avocado since some of the elimination diets say no to that. No coffee will be dreadful (and no cream and sugar in it - artificial sweetener and stevia and other milk substitutes are just not the same, but I might have to get used to the nut and coconut milks), but I suppose if I am going to do this, I need to do it right, so no coffee at all, for a few weeks anyway. And then hopefully I can add coffee back in and be okay with it.  

Ennis, with that Christopher Bean coffee, did you ever try the amaretto biscotti one?  I had it, and loved it. But then after a few weeks, it started smelling and tasting awful, like a burnt rubber tire or something. I loved the Jamica Me Crazy flavor, and the chocolate donut wasn't too bad, and I could picture trying almond or coconut milk with that. But I don't like Stevia. I've tried it a few times before and not crazy about the flavor and it seemed to make me bloat, unless something else was causing that and it just was coincidence with the Stevia.  

Looking at some of the Atkins, Keto, and Whole Foods recipes, there are still many that seem to have ingredients listed as no-no's on many elimination diets. Like beef,  nuts, tomatoes, eggs, bacon, vinegar, citrus,  etc.  Even seafood is mentioned as a no on some of the elimination diet plans (which makes me wonder if lake fish is still okay, I have no idea if it's talking more like shrimp, ocean fish and such as "seafood" or all fish, even lake). 

Well, off to go try and figure this out more. I really want to figure a weekly meal plan soon so I can start it.  

Oh, I am not seeing mushroom as a yes or no on these elimination diet lists.  I wonder how those would be.  Sometimes I eat them and seem fine. Other times I have bloated, yet don't know if it's the mushrooms or could have been something else. Ennis, I remember you said you make pizza bites with mushrooms.  Do any mushrooms ever bother you?  I remember someone saying they can sometimes be grown in a gluten base? 

 

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6 minutes ago, LilyR said:

I have no idea if I have histamine issues. This is confusing me even more.  I looked up a few elimination diets and find some that say you can eat one food, but another diet will say you can't eat that food.  I have no idea what to eat.  And the histamine thing mentions eating fresh chicken, fresh meat, etc. yet pretty much all the chicken I buy at the store, I think it might have been previously frozen. This is making my head spin. How do you all do it? The more I look into all this, the more hopeless I am feeling, rather than feeling more informed and prepared.  The one good thing is hopefully the elimination diet will help me see what bothers me, and help me feel better.  But also hoping I will be able to introduce at least some foods back in that perhaps don't bother me.  So it's getting through a good four weeks or so on this limited diet - to start with anyway.  And then hopefully I will indeed be able to add  few more foods back in. 

Some plans are saying rice is okay, and rice noodles. Some plans say no rice.  It's confusing. I am giving up spices once I start this diet, except for fresh for now because I need to see if Mc Cormicks bothers me or not. And then if specific spices bother me or not.  A while ago I was infusing oil with garlic, but not eating garlic whole, as that was on some papers I got about bloat.  It said garlic infused oil was okay, but actual garlic was not. That makes me wonder about garlic powder and dried minced garlic too. I'll have to experiment with that.  I'll give it all up while doing the elimination diet though.  I have seen onions as okay on some diets, and not okay on others.  I have seen nuts okay in some, but mostly not okay on most other elimination diets I've looked up. I have even seen avocado mentioned as a no-no on some of the diets. 

 I am having the hardest time right now trying to make a weekly meal plan that is within the elimination diet plan, also an affordable meal plan, and for my family too (although I don't care if they add stuff to theirs that I can't, like if I make chicken and they want to add a bbq sauce or something to theirs).  

I found this website: https://www.precisionnutrition.com/elimination-diet

And as you scroll down it has a chart of food you can and cannot eat.  I guess then I plan meals of just the approved fruits, veggies, turkey, chicken, I love lamb  but that's too pricey so that's out.  I can occasionally get fish but it's pricey and so that will not be often (and some of the diet plans say no seafood, so...???).  Anyone know if fresh bass from the lake is okay, because my husband could bring home plenty of that.  Not sure if that is considered a healthy fish because you rarely hear people mention they had bass (especial lake, not sea bass).  I am wondering if canned salmon is okay on an elimination diet because my daughter and I love making salmon patties.  Oh wait. I add an egg to that.  Ugh!  Well, maybe plain canned salmon or tuna with sliced avocado with it? I don't know.  And that's assuming I allow myself avocado since some of the elimination diets say no to that. No coffee will be dreadful (and no cream and sugar in it - artificial sweetener and stevia and other milk substitutes are just not the same, but I might have to get used to the nut and coconut milks), but I suppose if I am going to do this, I need to do it right, so no coffee at all, for a few weeks anyway. And then hopefully I can add coffee back in and be okay with it.  

Ennis, with that Christopher Bean coffee, did you ever try the amaretto biscotti one?  I had it, and loved it. But then after a few weeks, it started smelling and tasting awful, like a burnt rubber tire or something. I loved the Jamica Me Crazy flavor, and the chocolate donut wasn't too bad, and I could picture trying almond or coconut milk with that. But I don't like Stevia. I've tried it a few times before and not crazy about the flavor and it seemed to make me bloat, unless something else was causing that and it just was coincidence with the Stevia.  

Looking at some of the Atkins, Keto, and Whole Foods recipes, there are still many that seem to have ingredients listed as no-no's on many elimination diets. Like beef,  nuts, tomatoes, eggs, bacon, vinegar, citrus,  etc.  Even seafood is mentioned as a no on some of the elimination diet plans (which makes me wonder if lake fish is still okay, I have no idea if it's talking more like shrimp, ocean fish and such as "seafood" or all fish, even lake). 

Well, off to go try and figure this out more. I really want to figure a weekly meal plan soon so I can start it.  

Oh, I am not seeing mushroom as a yes or no on these elimination diet lists.  I wonder how those would be.  Sometimes I eat them and seem fine. Other times I have bloated, yet don't know if it's the mushrooms or could have been something else. Ennis, I remember you said you make pizza bites with mushrooms.  Do any mushrooms ever bother you?  I remember someone saying they can sometimes be grown in a gluten base? 

 

Now take it easy, take a step back, and do this a week at a time with the elimination diet. Base your choices by what is on sale...makes it easy. Meal prep your meat for the week in batch, cook it unseasoned, and try a seasoning each day to "mix it up" and give you a idea as to what bothers you as the meat is your "base line" for the week. This works great with say the family pack of chicken, a large pork loin, rump roast, etc. 

Probably ignore the histamine diet.....I just threw it out there. As I said you can quickly find if it is your issue by trying plain bone broth. Go to the store buy a carton of Bone broth....drink it hot in a cup for lunch by itself.....there you go. Again it could be something else in the bone broth but for a base test this will show well. Antihistamines can reduces symptoms/cover up issues also so you want to be off of any for 24 hours.

Mushrooms can be hit and miss....I called the farms and found 2 of hte local ones use rye seeds that coated in mushroom spores for starters -_- Amusingly the expensive organic local farmer here just sprays logs/wood chips with spores, or uses a coffee ground base and direct spore coated wood chunks....really depends on who you get them from and according to some people....it does not matter as they claim gluten does not end up in the mushrooms....but my body has told me otherwise which led to my phone calls in the past. And year, I did upside down portobello mushrooms with either pesto, or few spoons of pasta sauce, and vegan cheese for bagel pizza paleo style.....Also done chicken pizza by stuffing the pizza toppings and sauce into a chicken breast cordon bleu style.

Stevia....did you get the uncut stuff? The crap they sell in packets, and in the tubs in stores is cut with dextrose, maltodextrin, and other crap that can cause bloating. The pure uncut stuff has a bit of a bitter biter to it...you use 1/16 of a tsp just a pinch to substitute a tsp of sugar. Monk fruit is about the same but with a earthly bite...and both are expensive.

The almond biscotti one, I have a bag of it for next week, I just had the banana foster yesterday, dark rum and banana flavor, reviewed it and should see it up on their site soon. Profiling the Tiramasu one now....very complex arrangement of a smooth nestle like chocolate with hits of mascarpone....some other flavor bit of a bite, and mellow cinnamon almost nutneg note?

I have a salmon patty recipe that has worked with flax eggs....not quite the same but I did it for awhile when I had that egg yolk issue. It is a grain free recipe also. I am doing this week with eggs though as I will only be eating a tiny amount of a patty each morning.


 

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Why not try the most common ( in all humans , not just Celiacs) and give up dairy for a few weeks? If that is an issue, you can usually tell in a week or two.  

If that isn’t it , do a basic elimination diet where you pick about 10 safe foods - usually rice, chicken, olive oil, salt, pepper, cooked veg like carrots.   Then you do that for a couple of weeks, if those foods seem to be working, then you add something else that might be problematic - like egg for a week and see how it works.  If it’s OK, you keep it and add another food or food group . If it’s not Ok, you have found a problem food . Go back to the foods that worked until you feel better and try another food.

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Another thing is a food and symptom diary. you write down everything you eat and the time . Then , you write symptoms and the time.  See if any patterns emerge.  

To make this easier, you will want to eat simple foods without a lot of ingredients.  If you eat a sandwich and some cookies - that’s 15-25 different ingredients.  You have no way of knowing what might be the issue.  Instead you eat some plain chicken and green beans with just salt and pepper.  Then a few hours later you have some peanuts.   That sort of thing.  You could just start with foods less likely to cause issues - eliminate all dairy, eggs, soy, corn, grains.  

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Thank you Ennis and Kareng.  I think I was starting to get too upset over all this.  Thanks for putting up with my whining and complaints, and thank you both for offering help and suggestions. Your last two posts helped me sort of chill out and I feel I can take this one step at a time now.  Things have been busy, and I have not felt well for so long, and other things going on in life right now, and I was starting to feel so overwhelmed with everything. 

I was thinking I can cook up a big batch of chicken, and I often saute green beans or roast carrots.  Would turkey be a safe choice also?  I am not sure whether to also eat beef, or try not to for a few weeks. I see it on some elimination diets, but not on others.  However, I like that idea to for now, just give up the main foods that tend to bother people (the soy, corn, dairy, eggs, grains).  

I was thinking of making chicken soup also, and could put some rice in that.  But I was wondering about making some veggie soup.  But the thing is I usually add some tomato sauce to it, but if I avoid tomatoes for a few weeks too, I am trying to think what to flavor a veggie soup with during this.  I'd still put celery, but if I give up onion, bouillon cubes, tomato sauce, garlic, and spices, I am not sure what to flavor soups with.  I suppose maybe as long as there is the celery.  Then I usually do veggies like spinach (or kale or escarole), carrots, green beans, cabbage.  Although I need to go look up veggies that cause less bloating and gas, like that low FODMAP.   I thought it might help if the veggies I used during these few weeks were the less fiber and gassy ones.  And if I have a little fruit, try and pick those on the FODMAP plan?  I don't know.  I noticed some elimination diets mentioned no bananas.  There seem to be a few veggies and fruits to avoid in some of the stricter plans.  I need to also remind myself, this isn't forever. It is just to get my stomach in a better place so I can then add things one at a time to see what bothers me.  Right now I am about ready to even call the drug companies about my prescriptions to make sure there is no corn or soy in them.  One I started taking in January, and it feels like when I did that my stomach started getting a little worse, and over the past months has increasingly gotten worse again. But who knows.  

Then also I will not use any spices for a while.  I know some people on this forum have good results using McCormicks, but so have had issues with it.  I use McCormicks like pretty much daily, so need to give that up also for a little while to see. 

Any suggestions on a soup to make, or anything for a good staple during this?  I am also wondering if it'd be okay to eat the noodles I've been getting which the ingredients are rice flour and tapioca starch.  

I had been keeping a food journal and so will get back into that habit. I stopped doing it once my stomach got better, but I need to get back into that.  

Thank you both for your help.  I really appreciate it.  I finally calmed down about it.  It is still a frustrating thing, but I need so badly to figure out what is causing issues.  There are things I ate when my stomach was at its worst that seemed gentle on my stomach, like eggs, bananas, even milk (I would often have a glass of milk and a banana for breakfast).  So maybe those things will end up being okay in the long run. Or I wonder if once my stomach got used to no gluten, now it's showing me other things that are bothering it.  We'll see. 

 

 

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One thing, I noticed cabbage was okay on the FODMAP plans, and even broccoli. This seems so surprising since you hear so many people say that both of those give them gas and bloating.  Do you think most veggies on the FODMAP plan would be okay during an elimination diet? Other than ones that are mentioned as no-go's on elimination diets like tomatoes, bananas? 

And would canned tuna and salmon be okay.  I have heard avocado is iffy.  I was thinking tuna and avocado would be a good lunch, but now I am not sure. 

But again, maybe I am getting too hung up on this, over-thinking it. Maybe just concentrate more on the main foods to avoid? (the dairy, eggs, soy, corn, oh, and potatoes, all nightshade veggies)

 

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I think turkey would be great!  I am sort of thinking you might just want to do a sort of bland diet - as if you were getting over the stomach virus.  So a simple chicken soup with some cooked veggies like carrots and green beans or peas - you can then put it over rice or rice noodles if you want.  I like your idea of staying away from dairy, etc.  You can do that for a few weeks.  

Grill the chicken on the grill or cook with a little olive oil in a pan - you can get a nice brown on the outside that adds a lot of flavor.  then put  little water in the pan and boil it and scrape the bottom and dump that in with the rice or veggies that are cooking.  You can throw that chicken in your soup/ rice.  If you cook fresh spinach in things - it can add a lot of spinach flavor.

 

I think cooked fruits or veggies are usually the easiest to digest.  But really keep it to a few things for a couple of weeks then add then when you are feeling a bit better.

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I would avoid those "noodles" starches = gas right now.
I avoid most stuff like cabbage, broccoli in all but the smallest amounts (1 leaf or 2-4 sprigs) and cook til mush. I found higher density vitamin greens to be best to avoid wasting the room I had for food, stuff like spinach, kale, butter leaf, romaine all have much higher ratios of vitamin A and K then other greens with less sugar, starches, carbs. So you can cram more in there.

Soups, during flares, I find using meat and herbs to flavor them best, I got a Pots de Herb blend that is nice from The Spice House, tested gluten free for me. But gentle herbs instead of spices...think of Italian and french cuisines. Bit of oregano, basil, rosemary, thyme, etc. Avoiding peppers, spices, and going very limited to no garlic and onions. Funny fact they make bonito flakes (dried fish) like Eden Foods, that makes a good fish flavoring if you boil them into water. Not now but later you can do this with coconut secret aminos,  wakame, or kambu for a asian fish stock for soups.

I would seriously suggest trying eggs...they have been my savoir for flares, I just cook them soft with almond milk in them in a microwave so they are moist...and soft.

I treat myself about once a month with either canned tuna, salmon, or millers crab meat (the real stuff), I found the crab easiest to digest and a super strong flavor in soups or with eggs.

But again step back and say "I will try this for the first week" "Try this the second week" etc. Step by step on how you will try stuff, I know you want to jump to it and try to see what all you can eat but you have to space it and take it every few days for your testing of yourself to be accurate.

Simple foods, the fewer ingredients the better, give yourself a low single digit number and stick to it so you do not get overwhelmed.

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On 6/22/2018 at 3:44 PM, kareng said:

I think turkey would be great!  I am sort of thinking you might just want to do a sort of bland diet - as if you were getting over the stomach virus.  So a simple chicken soup with some cooked veggies like carrots and green beans or peas - you can then put it over rice or rice noodles if you want.  I like your idea of staying away from dairy, etc.  You can do that for a few weeks.  

Grill the chicken on the grill or cook with a little olive oil in a pan - you can get a nice brown on the outside that adds a lot of flavor.  then put  little water in the pan and boil it and scrape the bottom and dump that in with the rice or veggies that are cooking.  You can throw that chicken in your soup/ rice.  If you cook fresh spinach in things - it can add a lot of spinach flavor.

 

I think cooked fruits or veggies are usually the easiest to digest.  But really keep it to a few things for a couple of weeks then add then when you are feeling a bit better.

That's a great idea to roast and cook chicken and veggies first before putting in soup to add flavor.  Of course I am starting this planning now, as a heat wave is approaching this weekend, and I'll be making hot soup, lol!  But whatever. I am making out a meal plan and shopping Wed or Thurs and then starting.  

Anyone know if canned olives (the black ones) would be an okay snack? 

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On 6/22/2018 at 3:48 PM, Ennis_TX said:

I would avoid those "noodles" starches = gas right now.
I avoid most stuff like cabbage, broccoli in all but the smallest amounts (1 leaf or 2-4 sprigs) and cook til mush. I found higher density vitamin greens to be best to avoid wasting the room I had for food, stuff like spinach, kale, butter leaf, romaine all have much higher ratios of vitamin A and K then other greens with less sugar, starches, carbs. So you can cram more in there.

Soups, during flares, I find using meat and herbs to flavor them best, I got a Pots de Herb blend that is nice from The Spice House, tested gluten free for me. But gentle herbs instead of spices...think of Italian and french cuisines. Bit of oregano, basil, rosemary, thyme, etc. Avoiding peppers, spices, and going very limited to no garlic and onions. Funny fact they make bonito flakes (dried fish) like Eden Foods, that makes a good fish flavoring if you boil them into water. Not now but later you can do this with coconut secret aminos,  wakame, or kambu for a asian fish stock for soups.

I would seriously suggest trying eggs...they have been my savoir for flares, I just cook them soft with almond milk in them in a microwave so they are moist...and soft.

I treat myself about once a month with either canned tuna, salmon, or millers crab meat (the real stuff), I found the crab easiest to digest and a super strong flavor in soups or with eggs.

But again step back and say "I will try this for the first week" "Try this the second week" etc. Step by step on how you will try stuff, I know you want to jump to it and try to see what all you can eat but you have to space it and take it every few days for your testing of yourself to be accurate.

Simple foods, the fewer ingredients the better, give yourself a low single digit number and stick to it so you do not get overwhelmed.

Thanks for info on the veggies and greens. I'll stick with the kale and spinach for now.  Maybe romaine, but not sure what to put on it. I was wondering whether to have any vinegar right now, just because it seems like a very tangy, sour ingredient on the tummy. I might stop all spices and herbs to start, but if I use any, I'll just use what I am growing.  And definitely no garlic or onion (bummer!).  No tomatoes - this is hard for an Italian, lol!  No potatoes for my Irish, no tomatoes or garlic for my Italian cravings.  My husband used to joke my blood was tomato sauce.  I love fresh tomatoes, pizza sauce, pasta sauce, putting tomato sauce in soups, and so on.  So, this will be interesting. And I used to cook with a lot of red pepper flakes and garlic. 

I was thinking eggs will be the first thing I add back in because I ate a lot of those when I was at my worst, before I found out I couldn't have gluten. Eggs seemed to be the easiest on my stomach.  I am thinking I am going to be okay with them, but to give them up for a week or two, I could probably do.  But that will probably be my first add in.  I wanted it to be dairy, but I think eggs would be more practical. 

Crab meat in a soup or with eggs sounds good. I will jot that down. 

I am thinking things like chicken, turkey, and veggies that have not seemed too harsh on me, like carrots and green beans.  Maybe a little rice, although I'll see if that tends to bloat me or not.  I saw blueberries as low FODMAP fruit and was thinking if I have a sweet craving I could have a few spoonfuls of blueberries.  I like zucchini a  lot, but so far it has bloated me, and I am hoping once my stomach heals I can go back to that (same with broccoli and cauliflower).  But for now, it couldn't hurt to avoid anything that seems to bloat.  Do you know if canned black olives would be an okay snack?

I am working on my grocery list.  Hopefully by Thurs or Fri I will be starting this.  I need to call the company that makes the beta blocker I am on because that was one more concern I was having.  I tried it for a week back in early Dec and could have sworn it did not agree with my stomach.  My dr seemed to doubt me.  I stopped taking it.  I went back on it mid January, and little by little my stomach has been getting worse and worse.  Could be other things, but I think I better call the company to see if there is gluten, corn or soy in it.  I did already check and supposedly it is gluten-free, but I seemed to get a few run-around answers before I got that one.  But even if there is corn or soy in it, that could be enough to be a problem. You wouldn't think one tiny pill a day could cause such harm though.  If there was gluten, I could see it.  But I guess even a tiny amount of soy or corn can do the same thing?  I don't get as severe or as many problems with soy or corn as I do with gluten.  But it's still not good at all though. 

Now I am hoping i just don't get sick of chicken or carrots, etc.  I started to get a little sick of eggs at one point, but that has gotten better.  

 

Oh, and I am not going to do pork because I am not sure if that bothers me or not but would a little beef here or there be bad? 

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