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Marym

Switching To Gluten Free

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So I have this weird thing going on like switching to gluten-free I'm going totally organic. I don't think that is the case but I think my problem right now is my mentality and thinking socially. I know I want/need to switch to gluten-free but I feel like I am doing something bad. Like I'm not American if I don't eat the usual stuff.

Did anyone used to eat chips and cheeseburgers? or chocolate, whole wheat, lots of sandwiches, fruits, pizza, gravy?

If so, how do you switch while staying who you are - or is that the point????? I know that there are a lot of things to eat that are gluten free but not my usual stuff....

don't know if this makes sense but I'm trying.......

:-)

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Did anyone used to eat chips and cheeseburgers? or chocolate, whole wheat, lots of sandwiches, fruits, pizza, gravy?

If so, how do you switch while staying who you are - or is that the point?????

We were carb-oholics and I thought I was doing my kids a favor by giving them whole wheat, whole grain "healthy"stuff. Now I know I was killing them slowly. We have always eaten pretty healthy, but we can still eat all the stuff you mentioned (besides the whole wheat of course). It depends on how much it means to you. Are you willing to have a different mind-set. Willing to create the perfect bread for sandwiches, hamburger buns etc.. Are you willing to spend a little extra time to figure out which chocolate and chips are gluten-free? There are SOOOO many choices out there. It can be done and you don't need to feel any different that your friends. You just need to learn to accept it and move forward. We're all here to help out however we can. Everyone has different tastes as to the best bread, the best cake mixes, cookies, etc...try them and find what you like. I don't miss it at all. I made a flourless chocolate torte for a co-workers b-day yesterday and it was HEAVEN. No one at my workplace misses it either. It I don't tell them, they have NO clue!! It is very overwhelming at first, but take one day at a time and shortly it will be hard to remember a time before Celiac disease--were you diagnosed??

As far as being 'American'--what is that anyway? There are so many cultures, races, ethnicities in America, it doesn't matter what you eat. That shouldn't define you as a person. Maybe focus on you as a person and what that means to you.

Keep your chin up, it does get better!!


Rachelle 20dance.gif

Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)

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'The usual stuff'. That kind of sums it up really.

We are so conditioned to eat the 'usual' stuff that the thought of eating 'unusual' stuff makes us feel strange or weird! But what if you went to live in India, or Japan? You would probably be eating different stuff to the 'usual', but we are so cosmopolitan these days that no-one bats an eyelid if you've been for a chinese, or an indian, so why should a gluten-free be any different? Would you be a different person if you moved to India and had curry every day? Ignore the comment that says 'you are what you eat'. It's not what you eat that makes you who you are! Change the comment to 'you are as healthy as what you eat makes you'.

We are so conditioned to eat bread. But there are many communities out there around the world that never eat bread or cake or cookies (and are a darn sight healthier for it!). If you had been brought up on Gluten-free it would have become your 'usual' way of eating.

Gluten-free is just a different way of enjoying food. Try to put the 'usual' stuff out of your mind. I often see people asking if anyone has recipes for copies of wheat- based foods. Gluten-free does not equate with wheat because it is the gluten that gives it it's character.

Don't try to copy or emulate the usual stuff because you may be disappointed. Instead try to embrace new things. You will find after a while these new things become 'usual'. Be glad to be different and individual - it's 'following the crowd' that has got us into this mess in the first place! The 'crowd' is out there stuffing themselves with gluten and just not getting the fact that it is that insidiously deceptive tasty gluten that is making them so sick.

Whatever you do, don't feel deprived. Feeling deprived makes you want to indulge in bad foods - high carb, high sugar, and that is counter-productive. Don't feel deprived, feel liberated. By losing that JUNK you are losing your pain.

Try to keep your diet simple. Good wholesome organic if possible, unprocessed, unchemicalised foods. If you want a sweet treat, there are some fantastic recipes out there that deserve to be enjoyed, using things like rice, gram, fava, sorghum or other flours.

Just be careful though, as many who are gluten intolerant also have a problem with dairy and sometimes soya, corn, eggs or yeast and other things can also be triggers for symptoms. If you have been very poorly with the gluten intolerance you may quite likely be suffering with malabsorption issues so it may be prudent to support with some good vitamin, mineral and elemental supplements at least until your system has sorted itself out and had time to heal.

It's a bit daunting to start with but you get the hang of it eventually. I wish you well with it and on it. Get off the gluten merry-go-round and fly!!!!!


Ali - 50 - struggled with what I now know to be GI symptoms and poor carb digestion for at least 35 years! Diabetic type II (1997). Mother undx Celiac - lifelong diabetic Type 1 & anemic (plus 1 stillborn and 10 miscarriages after me). Father definitely very GI.

Stopped gluten & dairy, Jan 08, but still other issues so dropped most carbs and sugar and have been following the Specific Carb Diet (SCD) since March 08. Recovery slow but steady and I can now eat a much broader range of foods especially raw which are good for my digestion and boost my energy level.

Not getting better? Try the SCD - it might just change your life.........

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We were carb-oholics and I thought I was doing my kids a favor by giving them whole wheat, whole grain "healthy"stuff. Now I know I was killing them slowly. We have always eaten pretty healthy, but we can still eat all the stuff you mentioned (besides the whole wheat of course). It depends on how much it means to you. Are you willing to have a different mind-set. Willing to create the perfect bread for sandwiches, hamburger buns etc.. Are you willing to spend a little extra time to figure out which chocolate and chips are gluten-free? There are SOOOO many choices out there. It can be done and you don't need to feel any different that your friends. You just need to learn to accept it and move forward. We're all here to help out however we can. Everyone has different tastes as to the best bread, the best cake mixes, cookies, etc...try them and find what you like. I don't miss it at all. I made a flourless chocolate torte for a co-workers b-day yesterday and it was HEAVEN. No one at my workplace misses it either. It I don't tell them, they have NO clue!! It is very overwhelming at first, but take one day at a time and shortly it will be hard to remember a time before Celiac disease--were you diagnosed??

As far as being 'American'--what is that anyway? There are so many cultures, races, ethnicities in America, it doesn't matter what you eat. That shouldn't define you as a person. Maybe focus on you as a person and what that means to you.

Keep your chin up, it does get better!!

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Yep, I ate all that stuff before going gluten-free, too, and now I can't eat that stuff. Guess what, tho? Gives me a great excuse NOT to buy a coworker's kid's fundraiser enchiladas or Girl Scout cookies! That's a bonus for me. Also, as I've morphed my family to a gluten-free diet, they all comment how good they feel, and how they don't have that energy slump they used to get after eating regular pizza.

Over all, I think I eat SO much healthier now that I'm gluten-free, and there's far less junk food in our house. WHAT A GREAT GIFT FOR ME AND MY FAMILY, and it never would've happened if I hadn't been diagnosed as celiac.

That said, the transition to gluten-free is hard--it's really an adjustment that takes many months. Here are my newbie tips:

gluten-free newbie tips--now you can eat to treat, and soon feel better. Here are some key coping strategies to get you started.

1. Know that you will grieve your old favorite gluten-filled foods. I actually tear up when I see a brioche sometimes. Grieving is normal, BUT IT IS NOT EASY OR COMFORTABLE. People around you will eat treats you can't have and you will feel sad and isolated. Strategy: stock your car, office, purse, backpack, secret drawer at home with gluten-free treats you can reach for any time you are feeling deprived. This really helped me. I recommend Baby Ruth Bars, Snicker Bars, Lara Bars, Dove Dark Chocolate, meringue cookies, macaroon cookies (read labels), Butterfinger, Reeses Peanut Butter Cups. You get the idea. Also


Diagnosed in March 2006 by blood test and biopsy. Eleven year old son diagnosed in May 2006. Both gluten-free since diagnosis.

The Susanna (Flagstaff, AZ)

"I GOTTA have more cowbell!."

--The legendary Bruce Dickenson

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Hi All!

A little info about myself.

26 years old, been battling bowel issues since I was 11 or so. Originally diagnosed with IBS about 4 years ago (Yes, I went that long without a diagnoses). Recently (September 07), I had a life altering experience. My boyfriend of 4 yrs ended our relationship. This devistating news caused me to stop eating (I know, bad). When I did eventually eat I ate rice, chicken, eggs, yogurt and steered clear of breads etc. I felt amazing and I even lost weight (I had been battling weight gain since severe anxiety forced me to go on meds).

So here's my current situation. I went back to eating foods with gluten content and am feeling icky again. But, I am finding it hard to completely eliminate gluten from my diet. This is due to the fact that my family members are not affected by gluten and LOVE bread products and that there are many things that I am finding hard to cut from my diet (completely). I have managed to avoid gluten in my diet, but occasionally I break down and have pizza (which really is my downfall). What triggered my thoughts on Celiac was the small patches of blistery dry skin I would get on my face and my doctor had mentioned that many with a gluten intolerance have skin problems and eczema is also increased by gluten content in the diet.

I suppose I am here to ask some advice.

How long did it take those of you who are gluten-free to be completely gluten-free? How long did it take for you to feel "good" again?

I'm afraid of gaining weight again because my absorption will increase - how can I avoid that? I kickbox regularly as well as play hockey.

How long did it take for you to get rid of the bloating, cramping, diarrhea etc?

I went a full week but still got the diarrhea and had to use imodium. I am heading to Cuba in a couple weeks and I don't want to be sick before leaving.

There aren't many gluten-free resources in my town - and what I have found tastes nasty (I could never make a sandwich with the rice bread I have). Its also extremely expensive on a small budget.

Suggestions would be great!

Thanks.

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Hi All!

A little info about myself.

26 years old, been battling bowel issues since I was 11 or so. Originally diagnosed with IBS about 4 years ago (cut, read above...)

Suggestions would be great!

Thanks.

Hello,

As someone said earlier: embrace the change! I've put on my cooking hat and I dare gluten-lovers to eat as 'good' as I do, both sense of the word. This is why you should'nt worry too much about gaining weight again: gluten free means none of these high calorie things we (used) to eat all the time: sandwiches, pizza, beer, pastas, etc. Instead, cook some fish, prepare some Quinoa in advance that you can use with meals or as a salad by adding some of your favorites (raisins, cashews, veggies, ...). You'll see, there are many ways to eat gluten free and affordably.

The biggest challenges is probably going out, but find a few restaurants you like and get close with management, explain what is celiac and how serious are we when we say no gluten. As said earlier, they tend to be more and more accomodating as they understand food allergies&intolerances are a significant part of their market share.

As for Cuba, well, I'm going to Peru. I know I'll be able to find gluten free food, but I'm bringing my own emergency-food-kit for times I won't be able to trust the food. Bring cards with you (on celiactravel.com you will find cards explaining what Celiac is in about any language.)

And the family, why don't you get them to read some of the posts here if they don't understand how serious this is?

Good luck :)

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